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Full text of "Course catalogs, 1959-1965"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/coursecatalogs1959stat 



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CATALOGUE 1959-1960 




LI DA LEE TALL 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 




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STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT TOWSON 

Baltimore 4, Maryland 




IIBERT S. COOK LIBRABY 

TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 
BALTIMORE 4, MARYLAND 

CATALOGUE 1959 - 1960 
Ninety-fourth Year Begins September, 1959 



A]?S3St 



X 



CONTENTS 

Calendar for 1959-60 5 

The College 7 

Accreditation and State Support 7 

History 7 

Objectives 7 

Campvis, Buildings, and Facilities 8 

Future Development 11 

Admissions 12 

Admission Requirements 12 

Expenses 15 

Scholarships, Loans, Student Employment 19 

Student Life Program 21 

Counsehng and Advisory Service 21 

Health Service 22 

Residence Hall Activities 23 

Awards, Honors 24 

Student Organizations 24 

Publications 27 

Academic Regulations 28 

Academic Program 31 

Courses of Instruction 46 

Graduate Program 90 

State Board of Education 95 

Administrative Officers 95 

Faculty and Staff 95 

Graduates 1958 109 

Alumni Association 117 

136547 



CORRESPONDENCE 



The mailing address 



State Teachers College at Towson 
Baltimore-4, Maryland 

The telephone number 

VAlley 3-7500 

Switchboard open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily 
except Saturday and Sunday 

Specific correspondence should be addressed as follows: 

ADMISSION MATTERS Director of Admissions 

BUSINESS MATTERS Business Manager 

GENERAL MATTERS President 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS Director of Residence 

SCHOLARSHIPS Dean of Students 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORD Registrar 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
AT TOWSON, MARYLAND 



1959 
June 20, Saturday 



June 22, Monday 
July 31, Friday 



September 13, Sunday 



September 13-17 



Calendar for 1959-60 

Summer Session 

Registration for classes, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, Stephens 

Hall 
Registration for residence, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 

Newell Hall 

Classes begin 

End of summer session 
Residence halls close 5 p.m. 

First Semester 

Residence halls open for all new students 1 p.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Orientation and registration for new students 



September 16, Wednesday New day students leave residence halls by 9 a.m. 

Residence halls open for returning students, 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 



September 17, Thursday 



Registration for returning students, 8:30 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 



September 18, Fi4day Classes begin 

November 18, "Wednesday Midsemester 

November 2 5 , Wednesday Thanksgiving holiday begins 2 p.m. Residence halls 

close 3 p.m. 



November 29, Sunday 
November 30, Monday 
December 18, Friday 

1960 
January 3, Sunday 
January 4, Monday 
January 27, Wednesday 
February 2, Tuesday 
February 2, Tuesday 



Residence halls open 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Christmas holiday begins 2 p.m. Residence halls 
close 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

First semester examinations begin 

Examinations end 

End of first semester 



February 3, "Wednesday 



February 7, Sunday 
February 8, Monday 

February 9, Tuesday 
April 6, Wednesday 
April 14, Thursday 

April 24, Sunday 
April 25, Monday 
June 1, Wednesday 
June 7, Tuesday 
June 8, Wednesday 
June 12, Sunday 



Second Semester 

Residence halls open for new students, 9 a.m. to 1 1 

a.m. 
New students report for Orientation and pre- 

registration 9 a.m. 

Residence halls open for returning students, 1 p.m. 

Registration for returning students, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Midsemester 

Easter holiday begins 2 p.m. Residence halls close 
3 p.m. 

Residence halls open 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Second semester examinations begin 

Examinations end 

Second semester ends 

Baccalaureate Service 10:30 a.m. 
Commencement 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close 6 p.m. 

LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 



1959 

September 8, Tuesday School Opens 

November 25, Wednesday Thanksgiving holiday begins 2 p.m. 

November 30, Monday Classes resume 

December 18, Friday Christmas holiday begins 2 p.m. 



1960 

January 4, Monday 
April 14, Thursday 
April 25, Monday 
June 10, Friday 



Classes resume 

Easter holiday begins 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

School closes 



THE COLLEGE 



ACCREDITATION AND STATE SUPPORT 

The State Teachers College at Towson is Maryland's oldest and largest 
teacher education institution. It is a four-year college, accredited by the 
Maryland State Board of Education, the Middle States Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools, and the National Council for the Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education. It is a member of the American Council on 
Education and has been approved by the American Association of Un- 
iversity "Women. 

The college is an integral part of the system of public education in the 
State of Maryland. It is governed by the State Board of Education and is 
supported almost entirely by legislative appropriations. No tuition is 
charged Maryland residents for the teacher-education program. In lieu of 
tuition payments, students from Maryland pledge themselves to teach two 
years in the public schools of the State upon graduation. Students pay 
only such fees as are used in their own activities. 

HISTORY 

The Maryland Legislature of 1865 passed a law establishing the Mary- 
land State Normal School which was opened on January 15, 1866. For 
many years it was the only institution devoted exclusively to the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 

The school had three locations in the city of Baltimore, the best re- 
membered being at Lafayette Square, where the institution was housed 
from 1876 until its removal in 1915 to the present suburban location in 
Towson. 

From its founding in 1866 the school offered a two-year course for 
the preparation of elementary school teachers for Maryland. In 1931 the 
course of study was increased to three years and in 1934 to four years. The 
legislature of 193 5 authorized the institution to grant the "Bachelor of 
Science" degree and to change its name to the State Teachers College at 
Towson. 

Until 1946 the college confined itself to the single purpose of educat- 
ing teachers for the elementary schools. In that year a junior college was 
established to offer two years of college work on a transfer basis. In 1947 
the college enlarged its program to include the preparation of teachers for 
the junior high school, and in 1949 the preparation of teachers for the 
kindergarten-primary grades. In 1958 a graduate program leading to the 
degree Master of Education was inaugurated. 

OBJECTIVES 

Objectives of the Teachers College 

The central purpose of the college is to prepare the best possible 
teachers for the public schools of Maryland. To this end, the educational 



program comprises a careful blend of cultural and professional oflFerings. 
The aim is to provide learning experiences through which students may 
acquire a broad cultural background, professional knowledge and skills, 
and a philosophy of education. In fulfillment of this purpose, the faculty 
aims to help each student demonstrate progress in abihty to: 

1. Practice the values of democracy, accepting the responsibilities 
as well as the privileges involved. 

2. Live by ethical principles and respect spiritual values. 

3. Acquire facts, develop understandings, skills, and appropriate 
attitudes in the various academic areas. 

4. Understand and use the general and special methods of inquiry 
of all the major disciplines. 

5. Learn and apply the contributions of the past, of all races, and 
other cultures. 

6. Gain increasing understanding of self and of human development. 

7. Know the materials for learning and the procedures for planning 
experiences to meet the needs of learners. 

8. Apply in teaching, the principles that govern the learning process. 

9. Evaluate and record individual strengths and needs of learners. 

10. Organize time and daily living to foster physical and mental health. 

11. Go on learning continuously. 

Objectives of the Junior College 

The objectives of the Teachers College, except for those which relate 
specifically to professional education, apply to the Junior College program. 
The program has a two-fold purpose: first to offer a two-year program of 
liberal arts, and second to offer individual programs that will enable stu- 
dents to continue their education in colleges of their choice. There are no 
terminal courses as such; the entire program is built on the assumption that 
the students expect to continue their college education after the two years 
in the Junior College. The program, therefore, offers courses that will per- 
mit students to transfer to various senior colleges without difficulty or 
without loss of time. 

CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS 

In 1915 the college moved to its present site in the southern part of 
Towson on York Road, one of the main thoroughfares connecting Balti- 
more with northern communities. The ninety acre campus is one of the 
most beautiful in this part of the country. It offers opportunities for 
healthful outdoor recreation and for coordinating classroom instruction 
with field study. 

The college is near enough to Baltimore for students to share in 
the cultural advantages that the city offers. Various institutions such as 



The Johns Hopkins University, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, 
museums and Ubraries contribute to the intellectual and social interests of 
the area. The city affords opportunities to attend opera, concerts, and the 
theater. 

Although the institution can claim almost one hundred years of 
existence, it has occupied its present campus only slightly more than 
forty years. All buildings are thus of modern fire-resisting construction and 
have been erected in line with a definite plan of campus development. 

Stephens Hall (the administration building) is an impressive structure 
of Jacobean architecture which dominates the campus group and sets the 
pattern of architecture characteristic of all the buildings on the front cam- 
pus. It is named for M. Bates Stephens, State Superintendent of Education 
from 1900 to 1920, and contains administrative offices, classrooms and lab- 
oratories, and the auditorium. 

The Albert S. Cook Library, completed in 1957, is named for Albert 
S. Cook, State Superintendent of Schools from 1920 to 1941. A striking 
building of modern architecture and functional design, the building has a 
book capacity of 100,000 volumes and a seating capacity of 450. In addi- 
tion to stack areas and general reading rooms, it contains a periodical room, 
a seminar room, a micro-film and micro-card room, a Ustening room for 
phonograph records, a lecture room, a teaching materials center, and 
several typing alcoves. 

The Lida Lee Tall School is the laboratory school used for observation, 
demonstration, and the practice of teaching. It consists of a kindergarten 
and six elementary grades. The school was named for Lida Lee Tall, presi- 
dent of the college from 1920 to 1938, under whose administration the 
present building was erected. In addition to classrooms, the building in- 
cludes offices, a cafeteria, a library and an assembly room. The school has 
played an important part in the program for teacher education since the 
year 1866. Early in its history the school was called the Model School and 
later the Campus Elementary School. 

Wiedefeld Gymnasium is named for M. Theresa Wiedefeld, president 
of the college from 1938 to 1947, during whose administration it was 
erected. The building includes a large playing floor, spectators' balcony, 
offices, special rooms for individual physical education work, and shower, 
locker and dressing room facilities. 

Newell Hall, named for McFadden Alexander Newell, the founder 
and first principal of the institution, is one of the three residence halls for 
women. In this hall are the offices of the resident director and the dietitian, 
a large foyer, a television room, a conference room, a guest room, service 
rooms for students, and study and committee rooms. Students' rooms on 
the first and second floors are arranged in suites of two rooms with bath. 
Each room accommodates two or three students. The third floor has the 
usual arrangement of rooms and group baths. 



Richmond Hall, named for a former principal of the school, Sarah E. 
Richmond, adjoins Newell Hall. This building is occupied by freshmen 
women and some members of the Freshman Advisory Council. Most of 
the rooms accommodate two students. There are a few single rooms and a 
sleeping porch with adjoining dressing and study rooms. On the first floor 
is a large attractive lounge which is tised for formal social affairs. 

Prettyman Hall, named for E. Barrett Prettyman, principal of the 
school from 1890 to 1905, is the newest women's residence hall. Most of its 
rooms accommodate two students, but there are a few single rooms and sev- 
eral larger rooms for three students. The building contains a large lounge, 
several smaller lounges and study rooms, a recreation room, students' serv- 
ice rooms, and quarters for the resident director and resident supervisors. 

George W. Ward Hall and Henry S. West Hall are two identical res- 
idence halls for men, named for former principals of the school. Each 
contains a lounge with connecting kitchen, recreation room, and office and 
apartment for the resident supervisor. Rooms for students are modern in 
design and equipped with built-in facilities. 

East Hall (a converted adjacent residence) is used to house twenty 
upper-class men students. 

The Service Building includes the heating plant, engineers' offices, and 
the laundry. The top floor of this building is used as an auxiliary gym- 
nasium. 

Glen Esk, the President's home, is located on the northern part of the 
campus. The large house is surrounded by some rare trees planted years be- 
fore the college acquired the Towson site. 

Other buildings on the campus house the Health Center, and serve as 
homes for the chief engineer and the superintendent of grounds. 

FACILITIES 

The Library, now located in the modern Albert S. Cook Library build- 
ing, includes over 50,000 catalogued books in addition to a collection of 
5,000 volumes in the library of the Lida Lee Tall School. The Cook library 
also houses periodicals, courses of study, textbooks, pictures, pamphlets, 
standardized tests, slides, film strips, maps, phonograph records and other 
audio- visual aids. A reserve book section is located near the main charging 
desk. 

The Dining Room in Newell Hall has recently been remodeled to pro- 
vide seating capacity of 500 persons and to add a new kitchen unit. It is 
open to day students and faculty at lunch time. 

The Auditorium located in a wing of Stephens Hall has a seating 
capacity of one thousand in main floor and balcony. It is equipped with 
a Baldwin concert grand piano and a large Baldwin electronic organ. The 
stage has recently been supphed with a modern Hghting system for the 
use of the dramatic groups. 



10 



The Student Center on the lower floor of the dining hall wing is avail- 
able to all students. It has a snack bar, bookshop, recreation room, lounge, 
a small dining room, offices for student organizations, a chapel, study 
rooms, and an outdoor patio. In the Lounge, the Art Department regularly 
sponsors a series of art exhibits which are open to the pubHc. 

The Health Center in the Cottage to the rear of the campus school in- 
cludes a physician's and nurses' offices, a diet kitchen, rooms for men 
and women students, and hving quarters for the nurse. 

The Athletic Field in the north part of the campus is completely 

tile-drained and surrounded by a quarter-mile cinder track. It is used for 

track, soccer, and baseball. Tennis courts, archery ranges and facilities 
for other outdoor activities are nearby. 

The Vost Office located on the ground floor of Stephens Hall is a 
regular branch of the Baltimore Post Office. It is open daily from 8:30 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday for the sale of stamps and 
money orders and for mailing letters and packages. 

The Glen containing ten acres of land is developed as a conservation 
and recreation area. It is registered as a bird sanctuary and is a United 
States bird banding station. Science classes use the Glen as a laboratory. 
Several outdoor fireplaces and a large shelter with fireplace provide oppor- 
tunity for many outdoor social activities. 

An Aviation Center is a feature of the science department. It is 
equipped with a Link Trainer and is used by college students, pupils from 
the Lida Lee Tall school and from neighboring pubUc schools. 



FUTURE DEVELOPMENT 

The sharp increase in enrollment in public elementary and secondary 
schools is certain to lead to an increased enrollment in the colleges within 
the next few years. The State Department of Education has estimated that 
this college should look forward to an enrollment of from 1,500 to 2,000 
students in order to more nearly meet the need for teachers in the pubHc 
schools of the State. 

The college has been fortunate in securing the services of a nationally 
recognized firm of landscape and campus architects. They are advising 
the college regarding the placement of future buildings that are Ukely to 
be needed. 

The General Assembly of 1957 appropriated funds for a new campus 
elementary school which will be under construction in 1959. 

Requests presented to the State Planning Commission for future 
development include additional men's and women's residence halls, a new 
physical education building, an infirmary and health center, a fine and 
dramatic arts building, a science building, a service building, and additional 
playing fields. 



11 



ADMISSIONS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who seek to enter the teaching profession should possess the 
necessary physical, mental and social characteristics. In addition to the 
transcript of high school credits and grades, a confidential report con- 
cerning the student's quaUfications is required. Application for admission 
should be filed by April \, prior to the September xvhen admission is de- 
sired or by 'November 15 by those applying for admission the second 
semester. 

Provisional admission can be given on the basis of records at the end of 
the first half of the senior year in high school. Admission is confirmed after 
graduation records are on file in the college admissions office. The admissions 
requirements are: 

1. Graduation from approved high school.* 

An approved high school is a standard public high school or an 
accredited non-public secondary school. 

2. Recommendation from local school officials. 

Each candidate for admission from a Maryland public high school 
must be recommended by both the high school principal and the superin- 
tendent of schools in whose area the high school is located. A graduate 
of a non-public Maryland school or an out-of-state school must have the 
recommendation of the high school principal. 

3. Specific subject matter units. 

All applicants must have completed a well-organized curriculum 
totaling 16 units, including the following subjects required for gradua- 
tion from any Maryland public high school: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 1 unit 

Social Sciences, of which 1 unit must 

be United States History 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

Electives 8 units 

Total 16 units 

4. Achievement in scholarship. 

'■'Applicants over 19 years of age who are not graduates of approved high 
schools m,ay qualify for admission by making satisfactory grades in the 
Equivalence Examinations. 



12 



a. The scholarship standards for students entering from Balti- 
more City and from the counties, though based on diflferent marking sys- 
tems, are approximately the same. They are as follows: 

The State Board of Education requires that applicants from the 
county high schools shall have made grades of A or B in at least sixty 
per cent of the college entrance courses and a grade of C or higher in all 
other college entrance courses taken during the last two years of high 
school. Students who do not meet this standard may be considered for 
admission on the recommendation of the high school principal and the 
approval of the superintendent of schools. 

Applicants from Baltimore City high schools must have an average 
of eighty per cent in the last two years of high school work. Students not 
attaining this average may be considered for admission on the recommenda- 
tion of the high school principal and on the approval of the superintendent 
of schools. 

b. The testing programs now operating in the high schools and the 
freshman testing program of the college are regarded as sources of impor- 
tant supplementary data. Results of these tests are utiHzed in analyzing a 
student's potentiaUties and may serve as additional bases for determining 
a student's readiness for college. 

5. Certification by the college physician. 

AppHcants must meet acceptable standards of health and physical 
fitness; therefore a thorough physical examination by the college physician 

is required of all students. Complete speech and hearing tests are required 
of those referred to the speech chnic by the college physician or the ad- 
missions office. 

6, Citizenship in the United States. 

According to a by-law passed by the State Board of Education 
only citizens of the United States shall be employed in the State public 
school system or admitted to the state teachers colleges. 

THE PLEDGE TO TEACH IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND 

Every Maryland Student applying for admission to the teacher- 
education program is required to sign the pledge to teach two years in 
Maryland immediately following graduation unless temporarily released 
by the State Board of Education. 

A student who for any reason cannot teach immediately upon 
graduation is expected to secure from the president of the college a defer- 
ment or a release. 

Deferments may be granted for periods of one or two years for 
reasons deemed valid by the president. A release from the pledge to teach 
is granted only in rare circumstances when it is obvious that fulfilling the 
pledge would be a virtual impossibility. 



13 



A student who, upon graduation, does not teach and does not obtain 
a release or deferment shall have entered on his permanent record a state- 
ment that he is not entitled to honorable dismissal because of his failure to 
fullfiU his obhgation to the State. 

ADMISSION TO THE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The requirements for admission to the junior college division are 
the same as to the teacher-education program, except for the following: 
( 1 ) the application does not have to be approved by the County Superin- 
tendent; (2) the appHcant to the junior college does not have to meet 
as rigid physical standards as the teachers college student. 

TRANSFER FROM THE JUNIOR COLLEGE TO THE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Students in the junior college may transfer to the teachers college 
if they meet the physical standards required for admission to the retire- 
ment system of the State of Maryland, are approved by the county or city 
superintendent for admission to the Teachers College, and are accepted by 
the Committee on Admissions and Standards on the basis of recommenda- 
tions from the faculty. 

ADVANCED STANDING REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to meeting the regulations under Admission Requirements 
immediately preceding, an applicant for advanced standing must present 
complete records from each college attended and an acceptable academic 
record from the college that he last attended. 

Courses offered for transfer credit must be of C grade quaUty or 
better. 

A satisfactory record in the college is necessary to establish advanced 
standing. Advanced standing is provisional until the student shows abihty 
to maintain a satisfactory record in this college. 

A student may not transfer from one Maryland state teachers col- 
lege to another except by written permission from the State Board of 
Education. A student with failures in his courses will not be considered 
for transfer. 

PROVISION FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Because of the urgent need for elementary school teachers in Mary- 
land, the college provides for part-time and summer study as follows: 

(1) a program for graduates of hberal arts colleges to be taken during 
three six- week summer terms or in two semesters on the campus, (2) 
part-time study including late afternoon or evening classes for pubhc 
school teachers on emergency certificates who wish to work toward their 



14 



degrees, (3) a six- week summer session for (a) undergraduates who are 
former students of the college and hold teaching contracts or former 
students of other colleges with teaching positions who wish to work toward 
a degree, and (b) present students of the college who have permission from 
the Admissions and Standards Committee to enroll in the summer 
program. Further information regarding the summer session may be ob- 
tained from the Dean of Instruction. A bulletin is pubUshed early in each 
calendar year. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION 

For Maryland residents who register for the teachers college program 
no tuition is charged. In Heu of paying tuition they pledge at least two 
years of teaching service in the public schools of the State upon graduation. 

Those who enroll in the junior college pay $150 a year for tuition. 

For out-of-state students the tuition is $200 a semester for enrollment 
in either the teachers college or the junior college. 

OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

An activities fee of twenty-five dollars a year is assigned to the 
Student Goverment Association fund for class dues, student pubHcations, 
athletics, dramatics, assembly programs, and other authorized projects. 

An athletic fee of fifteen dollars a year is assigned to the athletic 
associations and used for the athletic and physical education program. 

A limited number of lockers are available for student use. The col- 
lege assumes no responsibility for personal property placed in the lockers. 
There is a fifty cent locker fee and a fee of fifty cents for gymnasium 
locker. 

Each student shares a mail box with another student. There is an 
annual fee of fifty cents for the mail boxes. 

A student is expected to buy the textbooks for his courses. These may 
be purchased in the college bookshop. Students are required to buy gymna- 
sium suits for the courses in physical education. 

A late registration fee of five dollars is charged to any student who 
registers after the date of registration named in the calendar. 

ACCIDENTAL INJURY REIMBURSEMENT 

For the benefit of those students who wish to participate, the college 
enters into an agreement with an approved insurance company to cover 
the students against any accidental injury either at school or at home dur- 
ing the college year. Participation in the plan is voluntary and costs approx- 
imately $4.50 for women and $7.30 for men. Students desiring this cover- 
age should make application at the business oflSce. 



U 



ADVANCE PAYMENTS 

Each applicant must pay an application fee of $10.00 and no applica- 
tion will be processed without this fee. When accepted, each appUcant must 
make an advance payment of $15.00 in order to reserve a place in the 
college. Both the apphcation and advance payment fees are appHed to the 
total student fees due at time of registration. These fees are NOT 
REFUNDABLE except in cases where the applicant is not eHgible and 
admission is denied. 

A deposit of ten dollars is required of all apphcants who are eligible 
to hve on the campus because of living outside the commuting boundaries. 
This deposit must be sent with the advance payment referred to above and 
will be deducted from the final amount of room and board due at the time 
of registration. 

The above room deposit is refundable if the student cancels his appli- 
cation and notifies the Admissions Office, in writing, prior to June 30 
for those entering in September and prior to December 15 for those enter- 
ing in February, or if the college denies admission to an applicant. 



HOUSING AND BOARDING 
Residence Costs 

Students who Uve on the camptis pay $266 for room and board for 
the academic year. Students approved as boarding students for whom dor- 
mitory facilities are not available will pay $179 a year for meals only. As 
dormitory space becomes available these students will be required to room 
in the dormitory at which time an adjustment will be made in the rate 
charged for board and room. 

For students who live off campus and take their meals in the college 
dining room, the cost for meals is $179 per year — $89.50 per semester. 

Rates for Hving expenses are subject to change by the State Board of 
Education. 

Residence Halls Policies 

There are not sufficient accommodations for all students who wish 
to live at the college. Priority is given to Maryland residents in the teachers 
college program who live beyond commuting distance. Only when 
space is available may students within commuting distance or out-of-state 
students be accommodated. "When the residence halls are filled to capacity 
students may board in Towson at approved homes with the permission of 
the college authorities. 

To qualify for Hving on campus, a student must be enrolled in the 
teachers college, carry a minimum of twelve semester hours of credit, and 
maintain a C average. A housing committee handles all exceptions on 
an individual basis. 



U 



Students who have reserved a room and entered a residence hall may- 
withdraw to become day students only in case of change of residence, or 
directed teaching in their home areas. An adjustment of fees is made in 
the Business Office for special cases. If vacancies occur in the halls during 
the year, students on the waiting Hst may be admitted according to their 
dates of application, commuting problems or other extenuating circum- 
stances. 

All residence hall students are expected to leave the halls no later 
than twenty-four hours following their last examinations at the end of 
each semester. 



ROOM FURNISHINGS FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS 

Each student will need at least four single sheets, one pair of blankets, 
pillow cases, spread, quilted pad for bed 72 x 30 inches, towels, and two 
laundry bags. The quilted bed pads may be purchased from the college book 
shop. Bed Unen and towels must have woven tapes attached giving the 
student's full name. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 
Maryland Residents 

Teachers College Students 
Semester 
I 

Activities Fee $ 25.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 

Mail Box & Locker Fee 1.00 

Total — Day Students $ 41.00 

Board and Room 133.00 

Total — Boarding Students 174.00* $ 

Junior College Students 

Fees as above $ 41.00 

Tuition 75.00 

Total — Day Students $ 116.00* $ 



'^'Fees already paid will he deducted from the above. 



17 



Semester 




Total 


II 




Year 




$ 


25.00 

15.00 

1.00 




$ 


41.00 


133.00 




266.00 


133.00 


$ 


307.00 




$ 


41.00 


75.00 




150.00 


75.00 


$ 


191.00 



Junior college students may obtain rooms in the neighborhood and 
take their meals in the college dining hall. (For cost, see o§ campus stu- 
dents, Housing and Boarding, page 16) 

Out-of-State Students 

Students residing outside of the State pay $200.00 tuition each semes- 
ter for either the teachers college or junior college program. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 
All fees due the college must be paid by the time of registration. 

PART-TIME AND SUMMMER STUDENTS 

A part-time student (normally one who registers for less than 12 
semester hours) in the regular session, and all summer students, will pay 
ten dollars per semester hour plus a two dollar registration fee each term. 
The registration fee is not refundable. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

A student withdrawing from the college must complete an official 
withdrawal card and file it in the registrar's office before he is entitled to 
any refund. Refunds are made on the following basis: 

Day Students 

A day student who withdraws within two weeks after his initial 
registration is entitled to a refund of fees paid and to a refund of tuition 
for the semester minus ten dollars. After the two week period no fees are 
refunded and tuition is refunded only on a half-semester basis. 

Boarding Students 

A boarding student who withdraws from the college receives refunds 
for fees and tuition in accordance with the regulations for day students. 
The refund of payment for room and meals is subject to the following 
regulations: 

1 . A student who withdraws from the dormitory within two weeks 
after the initial registration will be charged for one week in 
excess of his residence in the college. 

2. A student who withdraws from the dormitory at the request of 
the college after the first two weeks of any semester shall be 
charged for one week in excess of his residence in the college. 

3. A student who withdraws from the dormitory on his own or 
his guardian's initiative after the two weeks following regis- 
tration and before mid-semester shall receive no refund of board 
for the first half of the semester. If the withdrawal occurs after 



18 



the mid-semester, there will be no refund of board paid for the 
entire semester. 

LIABILITY FOR UNPAID TUITION 

A Maryland student enrolled in the teachers college program pays 
no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the State. 

If he leaves before graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose 
of continuing his education in a college program which does not lead to 
teacher certification, he will be billed at the junior college tuition rate 
for the education he obtained at the college. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he transfers to 
a Maryland institution which has a teacher education program approved 
by the State Department of Education and if he reaffirms his pledge to 
teach for two years in the Maryland pubUc schools upon graduation. 

FINANCIAL AIDS FOR STUDENTS 

All students attending the college receive subsidy from the state, and 
residents of the State of Maryland enrolled in the teachers college pay no 
tuition. Still, there are the costs of residence living, transportation, books 
and other incidental matters which some students are unable to meet. Some 
students may secure assistance through scholarship funds. Scholarship and 
loan funds are available to assist such students. 

Scholarships 

The Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships were established by the will 
of Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of J. Charles Linthicum, who was a 
member of the class of 1886. The fund is administered by the trustees of 
the estate and the college committee on scholarships and loans. 

Both freshmen and upperclassmen in the teachers college program are 
eligible for these one hundred dollar scholarships. Ten of these schol- 
arships have been set aside for entering freshmen. High school seniors who 
are contemplating entering the teachers college and who need some assist- 
ance in meeting the college expenses for the first year should write to the 
Committee on Loans and Scholarships for application blanks. Such applica- 
tions must be filed no later than April 15. For upperclassmen there are 
twenty-five or more Linthicum scholarships. The number varies slightly 
according to the income from the fund. Upperclassmen apply to the 
Committee on Loans and Scholarships. 

Worthy students in the Teachers College are eKgible for a one 
hundred dollar scholarship awarded each year by the Maryland organiza- 
tion of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Income from the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund is allocated in fifty 
dollar awards to students in the Teachers College. A total of $250 is cur- 
rently being awarded as scholarships. 

Upperclass students may receive the Minnie V. Medwedeflf Endow- 
ment Scholarship. This award is made annually to an outstanding student 



19 



selected by the trustees of the fund. The scholarship was established in 
memory of Minnie V. Medwedeflf by her father. Miss Medwedeff was an 
instructor in the college from 1924 until her death in 193 5. 

Loan Funds 

Students in need of funds to meet college expenses should confer with 
their advisers and the chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and 
Loans. They may make requests for loans by applying to the chairman of 
the Trustees of the Student Loan Fund at the college, unless otherwise stat- 
ed. Letters of recommendation must be filed with the apphcation. Loans are 
made at a low rate of interest and can be renewed until after the student 
has received a teaching position. 

Three loan funds have been established for college students: the Sarah 
E. Richmod Loan Fund, the Student Loan Fund, and the Edward Moulton 
Fund. Certain Maryland organizations have added to the opportunities for 
students to secure financial aid by offering loans annually. 

The Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund was established by Sarah E. Rich- 
mond, who was connected with the college for fifty-five years, as student, 
teacher, principal and dean of women. This fund has been increased by 
gifts from the alumni association. The Sarah E. Richmond Fund is the 
largest of all the funds and is administered by a special alumni committee 
consisting of: Miss Carrie Richardson, Mrs. Grace Carroll and Mrs. George 
Schluderberg. Requests for loans from this fund may be made directly to 
Miss Carrie Richardson, 5002 York Road, Baltimore 12, Maryland, or will 
be forwarded to the committee from the college. 

The Student Loan Fund which is administered by a committee of the 
faculty, has a value of $7,430, and was made up by contributions from 
the following: the Class of 1900 Memorial to Katherine Muhlback, the 
Class of 1925, the Normal Literary Society, the Pestalozzi Society, 
the Reese Arnold Memorial, the LilHan Jackson Memorial, the 
Esther Sheel Memorial (Class of 1927), the Carpenter Memorial, the Eu- 
nice K. Crabtree Fund (gift of the Class of 1931), the Pauhne Rutledge 
Fund (gift of the Class of 1934) , the Pearle Blood Fund (gift of the Class 
of 1940) , the 1933 Gift Loan Fund of Faculty and Students, the Gertrude 
Carley Memorial, Washington County Alumni, the Grace Boryer Downin 
Fund, the Class of 1941 Fund, the Martha Richmond Fund, the Tower 
Light Fund, the M. Clarice Bersch Fund (gift of the Class of 1951), and 
the Bettie Sipple Fund sponsored by the Maryland Federation of Women's 
Clubs. 

The Edward Moulton Fund, established in memory of a student 
of the Class of '57, is a short term loan fund open to all students, interest 
free. Make application to the Dean of Students. 

Student Employment 

Opportunity for student employment on the campus is hmited. The 
college discourages part-time employment during a student's first semester 
in attendance. Students desiring part-time employment should file an 
application in the office of the Dean of Students at the time of registration. 



20 



STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 

PRE-ADMISSION COUNSELING 

A close relationship exists between the guidance departments of the 
high school and the admissions office of the college. This relationship 
enables students to become acquainted with the college offerings early in 
their high school course and to work toward meeting the admission require- 
ments. Through visits of the high school students to the campus and 
visits of the college representatives to the high schools, direct contact with 
the college is estabUshed during the senior year in high school. 

After an application has been filed, the student is asked to report to the 
college for a physical examination and an interview with admissions person- 
nel. At the time of the interview, the complete high school record, findings 
of the physical examination, and the results of standardized tests aid 
admissions personnel in counseling the student. 

THE FRESHMAN ADVISORY PROGRAM 

Selected faculty members serve as personal and professional counselors 
to freshmen. Personal interviews, group meetings, and laboratory expe- 
riences are provided to promote self-orientation and to help freshmen ex- 
plore interests and abilities of professional significance. This program of 
personal and professional orientation is organized and administered as a 
regular part of the college curriculum. (See Orientation 101-102 and 
109-110, page 47 for further details.) 

VISITING DAY FOR FRESHMAN PARENTS 

On the second Sunday of the fall semester, parents of all freshman 
students are invited to spend an afternoon at the college. This occasion 
provides an opportunity for parents to tour the campus and to meet 
other parents, students and the faculty. 

THE ADVISORY PROGRAM FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

At the end of the freshman year, each student selects a faculty 
member who will serve as his adviser for the remaining years the student 
is in college. The relationship between student and adviser provides 
the student with an understanding adult with whom he may discuss his 
personal problems, and consider his special needs. When such assistance 
seems desirable, students are encouraged to consult instructors, the deans, 
and other college officials. 

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 

Teachers College Students 

Students entering the teachers college have already decided upon 
their profession. Vocational guidance for these students, therefore, is 
concerned with providing experiences upon which the student may draw 
in choosing a teaching area. If a student is advised to discontinue his 



21 



preparation for teaching, however, he is assisted by his advisers and mem- 
bers of the administration in investigating other vocational fields. 

Junior College Students 

Prior to entrance each junior college student is asked to furnish 
information concerning his interests and educational plans for the two 
years following junior college. The catalogue of the institution to which 
the student expects to transfer is examined to determine the prerequisites 
that he should complete in the junior college. On the basis of this informa- 
tion, and iisuaUy after an interview with admissions personnel, the stu- 
dent's program is planned. 

The orientation course for the junior college student is planned to 
assist him in the choice of a profession. Vocational tests are given. Career 
conferences held on the campus afford the student opportunities to meet 
and talk with leaders in many professions. These experiences are drawn 
upon as the student discusses his aptitudes and interests in various pro- 
fessions with his adviser. 

VETERAN STUDENTS 

Close contact is maintained between the Veterans Administration and 
the college through the registrar's office. Veterans who plan to use edu- 
cational benefits under any of the G. I. Bills are assisted in the completion 
of papers necessary to insure registration and prompt subsistence pay- 
ments. 

PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 

The supervisors of directed teaching furnish the seniors with whom 
they work information concerning placement in city or county schools. 
The dean of instruction helps to coordinate the requests from superintend- 
ents of schools for candidates at the various teaching levels. From the 
registrar's office are sent out complete records of each graduate including a 
summary of his progress in the coUege and a full report of his student 
teaching. 

Through the advisory program junior coUege students who are trans- 
ferring to other colleges or who are trying to find positions are given 
assistance. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The medical staff consists of the college physician, a full-time register- 
ed nurse, and a full-time practical nurse. The physician maintains regular 
office hours at the college and is on call at all times. 

A physical examination by the college physician is required of all 
students at the time of admission and in the senior year. Additional examin- 
ations are given when conditions warrant. Annual chest x-rays are com- 
pulsory for ail students. A student is expected to correct remediable defects 
immediately. Failure to follow the physician's instructions may jeopardize 
a student's status in the college. Health education and prevention of dis- 
ease are essential parts of the health service. 



22 



A student who has a condition or disabiUty which will prevent him 
from later quaUfjdng as a teacher is not eHgible to take the teachers col- 
lege course. 

A student who has a physical condition which prevents complete 
participation in the regular physical education program may be permitted 
upon authorization of the Committee on Admissions and Standards to take 
a modified program. Such a program would give the student the fundamen- 
tals of physical education necessary for teaching in the elementary or jun- 
ior high school. 

Medical advice and office treatment are free to all students. The 
health center contains rooms for emergency use. 

In case of contagious diseases parents are notified and are required to 
remove the student from the campus for the duration of the disease. 

The college assumes no financial responsibiKty for illness of sufficient 
seriousness to require hospitaHzation, x-rays, or special treatment. The 
college does not assume financial responsibiUty for any injury incurred on 
the athletic field or in any physical education class. 

The children attending the Lida Lee Tall School have the advantages 
of the college health service. 

RESIDENCE HALL ACTIVITIES 

Both the men and women resident students in their respective halls 
elect as their governing bodies a "Women's Resident Council and a Men's 
Resident Council. There are also two subordinate bodies of the Women's 
Resident Council known as Prettyman and Newell-Richmond Hall House 
Councils. These councils in cooperation with the residence personnel for- 
mulate poKcies pertaining to group living and arrange a program of activ- 
ities for the resident students. 

The college encourages students to attend services in the churches of 
their choice and makes it possible for them to meet the local clergymen. 

Students who are absent frequently over week-ends miss much of the 
education that living at college aflFords. Students are therefore encouraged 
to remain on the campus for as many weekends as possible. 

AUTOMOBILE REGULATIONS 

Parking space on the campus is limited and cannot be guaranteed for 
student parking. Day students who use cars to attend the college are re- 
quired to register their cars v/ith the business office promptly. Parking is 
permitted in specified areas only, and students violating parking regulations 
are subject to fine and other discipUnary action. 

Upperclass resident men who find it necessary to keep cars on 
campus must secure from the business office a permit which is issued by the 
business manager with the approval of the Housing Committee. 

Resident women are permitted to have cars on campus only by special 
arrangement with the Housing Committee. 



23 



AWARDS AND HONORS 

At the time of senior investiture, an honors list which includes the 
names of those students in each class with semester averages above the 
ninetieth percentile is announced. No student is included in this list whose 
average is below 3.0. On each semester's list, the number of times a student 
has been cited for honors is indicated. This list is also pubUshed in the 
Tower Light. 

At the graduation excerises the three students having the highest 
senior averages are given special recognition. 

A special gift from Mary Hudson Scarborough, a former faculty 
member, provides an award of fifty dollars for the senior student showing 
greatest achievement in the knowledge and teaching of arithmetic. 

Three national honor societies. Alpha Psi Omega, Gamma Theta 
Upsilon, and Kappa Delta Pi give recognition to outstanding students 
in the areas of dramatics, geography, and education. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Participation in student activities is recognized and encouraged as a 
valuable part of the college program. 

Student Government Association 

Enrollment in the college makes one automatically a member of the 
Student Government Association. This is the official coordinating body of 
all student organizations and activities. Its purpose is to maintain academ- 
ic freedom and student rights; to stimulate and improve a democratic 
student government; to improve student cultural, social, and physical 
welfare; and to foster the recognition of the rights and responsibilities of 
students to the college, community, humanity, and God. The Gold and 
White, the student handbook, is published yearly as an official guide. 

Student Resident Councils 

The Men's and "Women's Resident Councib, with the co-operation 
of all resident students, are responsible for establishing and maintaining 
standards of group hving and for promoting the social program of the 
residence halls. The Resident Director and her assistants cooperate with 
these groups. 

The Student Center Directory 

The Student Center Directory, a student-faculty group, assumes re- 
sponsibility for the program of the Student Center. 



24 



SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 

Freshman Advisory Council 

The Freshman Advisory Council is a trained group of upperclassmen 
who assist with the orientation of freshmen during the first semester. They 
plan the social programs for Freshman Week and act as student counselors 
to small groups of freshmen in matters affecting student social life. 

Marshals 

The Marshals are a service group assisting at convocations, fire drills, 
and at such public functions as the commencement exercises. May Day 
Celebration, and other special programs. They serve also as guides for offi- 
cial visitors and at conferences. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
The Interfaith Council 

This group is made up of delegates from each of the reUgious organ- 
izations and coordinates all the rehgious activities on the campus. 

Interdenominational Clubs 

The Student Christian Association, the oldest rehgious organization on 
the campus, seeks to unite students in fellowship of the Christian Church 
through worship, study and action. 

The Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship attempts through prayer and 
Bible study to foster personal commitments to Jesus Christ. 

Denominational Organizations 

Baptist Student Union 

Canterbury Club, for Episcopal students 

Christian Science Club 

Jewish Students Association 

Lutheran Students Association 

Newman Club, for CathoHc students 

"Wesley Club, for Methodist students 

"Westminster Fellowship, for Presbyterian students 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Glee Club 

The Glee Club, the largest musical organization on the campus, is a 
chorus of men and women students. It engages in choral work of various 
types and performs at numerous functions on and off campus. (See page 
72). 

Men's Chorus 

The Men's Chorus is open to all men students who like to meet to- 



25 



gether and sing, purely for enjoyment. College songs are featured, along 
with barbershop quartet selections. This group performs for various pro- 
grams on and oflF campus. 

Orchestra 

Membership in the orchestra affords training in ensemble work for 
students who play orchestral instruments. Those especially talented and 
interested may participate in solo and small group work. (See page 72) . 

Student Christian Association Choir 

The Student Christian Association Choir is composed of resident 
women students selected on the basis of talent and interest. The choir sings 
for various programs sponsored by the Student Christian Association and 
for college assembUes. Frequently, the choir is invited to give concerts in 
some of the churches of Baltimore and surrounding communities. 

DRAMATIC ORGANIZATION 

Glen Players 

The Glen Players, the dramatic club of the college, presents a yearly 
program of one-act and full length plays. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

Art Club 

The Art Club offers students an opportunity to work creatively both 
individually and in groups. The club at times carries out projects for the 
college. 

Student National Education Association 

The M. A. Newell Chapter of the Student National Education As- 
sociation is a professional club affiliated with the National Education As- 
sociation and the Maryland State Teachers Association. 

The International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club has been organized to acquaint stu- 
dents with the problems and issues of the day. It sponsors the delegation of 
Towson State Teachers College to the annual Mid-Atlantic United Nations 
Model General Assembly. 

Jazz Club 

The Jazz Club is dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of 
American jazz. The outstanding event of the organization's activities is 
the annual jazz concert. 

Photography Club 

The Photography Club offers the students an opportunity to develop 
skill in the use of the camera. Students learn to process their own films 
and to evaluate their pictures in terms of professional criteria. 



26 



Veterans' Organization 

The Veterans' Organization is composed of students who have actively- 
served in the Armed Forces of the United States. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

Every student is a member of either the Men's or Women's Athletic 
Association. 

Men's Athletic Association 

The college is a member of the Mason-Dixon Conference. The men's 
competitive teams include basketball, soccer, baseball, wrestling, 
track, tennis and lacrosse. In addition to an intercollegiate program a broad 
intramural program is carried out. 

Women's Athletic Association 

The Women's Athletic Association, working in cooperation with 
the Women's Physical Education Department, sponsors a variety of 
sports which include activities appropriate to all levels of skill. These 
sports consist of hockey, soccer, archery, tennis, basketball, bowling, 
badminton, dancing, swimming, volley ball, and sof tball. As an outgrowth 
of this elective program, informal sports competition is arranged with 
other colleges in the area. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Towers 

Towers is a semi-annual literary magazine which encourages creative 
writing among the students. 

Tower Light 

The Tower Light is the bi-weekly student newspaper publication of 
the college. 

Tower Echoes 

Tower Echoes is the yearbook sponsored by the Student Government 
Association and published by the senior class. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary society organized for the 
purpose of encouraging interest in drama among the student body. 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 

Gamma Theta Upsilon is a national honorary fraternity for the pur- 
pose of promoting interest in geography. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Epsilon Alpha Charter of Kappa Delta Pi, a national honor society, 
was installed at the college in February 1940. Students who meet the re- 



27 



quirements for membership are eligible for election during their junior and 
senior years. Prior to the installation of the Epsilon Alpha Chapter of Kappa 
Delta Pi there was a local honor society at the college, Chi Alpha Sigma. 
Its alumni members are welcome at the meetings of Kappa Delta Pi. 

PROGRAMS AND SPECIAL EVENTS 

The Student Government Association and the college sponsor a series 
of events designed to enrich the educational and cultural program on the 
campus. The programs are planned jointly by the program committee and 
the student assembly committee. Students, faculty and interested members 
of the community are invited to attend these events. Included in the series 
are performances by musical groups, lectures and discussions by outstand- 
ing scholars and citizens, art exhibitions, dance demonstrations, traditional 
and commemorative programs. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

The college calendar, which will be found on pages 5 and 6, indicates 
the dates when students must register. Students are not permitted to attend 
classes without having completed registration, and a fee is assessed for 
registration after the time assigned (see Expenses, page IJ). In addition 
to payment of the fee, students who register later than one week after 
the first day of classes must secure permission from the Committee on 
Admissions and Standards. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal student load is 15 to 17 semester hours of credit each 
semester. No student may carry a program in excess of seventeen hours 
without special permission from the Dean of Students or the Committee 
on Admissions and Standards. (Such permission is usually granted for 18 
semester hours if the student has a cumulative average of 2.50 and for 19 
hours if the average is 3.00 or better.) 

Students who are on academic probation, who have health problems 
or who are carrying heavy programs of work outside of the college may 
be required to carry less than a normal load of classes. 

AUDITING COURSES 

"With the consent of the instructor, a student may request permission 
to audit a course in which he has a particular interest. If the auditing of 
the course will not constitute an excessive load, such permission is usually 
granted by the Dean of Instruction or the Dean of Students. If there is 
any question, the request is referred to the Admissions and Standards 
Committee. No credit is to be earned in courses which are audited. 

CHANGE OF COURSE OR SCHEDULE 

The Dean of Instruction approves requests for course changes during 
the first week; thereafter, requests for changes are made to the Dean of 



28 



Students. Ordinarily no change may be made after the first week of classes 
except for reasons beyond the student's control. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified according to the number of semester hours 
completed as follows: freshman, 0-30 semester hours; sophomores, 30-60 
semester hours; junior, 60-90 semester hours; senior, above 90 semester 
hours. 

MARKING AND POINT SYSTEM 

A five-point marking system (A, B, C, D, F) is used to indicate quali- 
ty of academic work. The letter A designates work of superior quaUty; B, 
work of quahty substantially better than minimum requirement for grad- 
uation; C, work of satisfactory quality meeting the minimum requirements 
for graduation; D, work of less than satisfactory quaUty but allowable for 
credit, subject to the restrictions specified under Degree Requirements, 
page 33; F, work of such unsatisfactory quaUty that no credit is given. 
A mark of Inc. (incomplete) at the end of a semester carries no credit. 
Unless such a course is satisfactorily completed within three v/eeks after 
the Inc. is received, the grade for the course becomes F. The mark given 
for a course which carries no credit will be S (satisfactory) or U (unsatis- 
factory) . 

The academic average of each student is determined by assigning 
numerical values to the letter grades and weighting according to the 
number of class hours. The values assigned are: A, 4 points; B, 3; C, 2; 
D, 1 ; F, 0. The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in that 
course, totaling the credit hours and points for all courses completed, 
and dividing the total number of points by the total number of credit 
hours. A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required for graduation. An 
average of better than 3.00 is usually worthy of special mention. 

STANDARDS OF WORK REQUIRED 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain at least the 
following cumulative averages: Freshmen, 1.70; Sophomores, 1.80; Juniors, 
1.90; Seniors, 2.00. Students are placed on probation when the cumulative 
average is below the minimum standard for their class. 

Probation indicates uncertainty on the part of the college as to the 
student's probable sticcess. Probation is Kfted when the student shows 
satisfactory improvement in his work. A probationary student who fails 
to show such improvement may be asked to leave the college. The complete 
records of such students are reviewed by the Committee on Admissions 
and Standards at the close of each semester. 

Failure in a course usually delays graduation from the college. How- 
ever, the Committee on Admissions and Standards may grant a student 
permission to attend a summer session here or elsewhere and transfer the 
earned credit to the college. As a rule a student may not repeat a course 
more than once. 

29 



Entering students who seem to be defective in speech and/or hearing 
are referred to the Speech Division for testing. They may be required to 
take a course in Corrective Speech. Freshmen are required to take a course 
in Fundamentals of Speech. Superior students may be exempted from 
the required course if they pass a performance test given by two members 
of the Speech Division before the end of the first week of the course. 

Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking English 
122, Fundamentals of Speech, are required to satisfy the requirement of 
English 100, Corrective Speech, before being recommended for graduation. 

In general, a student is ready to enter the block of professional courses 
when: (a) he has met the orientation and speech requirements, (b) he has 
completed at least 60 hours of work with an average of 1.8 or higher, (c) 
he has cleared any failing courses from his record, and (d) he has made 
final arrangements with the director of his division. Deviations from these 
requirements may be made only with the approval of the Committee on 
Admissions and Standards. 

A student who makes more than one D grade in the semester of pro- 
fessional courses preceding student teaching will not be permitted to enter 
student teaching. If the student is allowed to remain in the college, he must 
repeat the semester of required professional courses. 

A student must have earned a minimum cumulative average of 2.0 
to be eligible to hold a major office in any student organization or to repre- 
sent the college as an official delegate. 

The personal development of each student is considered. If the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Standards is convinced that a student does not 
have the qualifications necessary for teaching, he Tnay he asked at any time 
to withdraw from, the college. 

ATTENDANCE 

Students are expected to be present at all their regularly scheduled 
classes and other college appointments. Absences from these appointments 
interfere with the progress of academic work and are contrary to the collec- 
tive interests of the college. The attendance policy places responsibility 
on the student for attending classes, filing reasons for absence, and being 
careful not to exceed a reasonable number of absences. 

Students should file within 48 hours after their return to college, 
on the official blank, a record of each absence except those for college- 
sponsored events. A record of absence for medical reasons will be filed 
at the Health Center. A record of absence for personal reasons will be 
filed in Stephens Hall at the Information Desk. 

No student may be excused from taking the semester examinations 
at the time scheduled except for illness, or other approved reasons. In case 
of illness, a doctor's certificate must be presented. Students who are ex- 
cused will be permitted to take an examination at a time arranged by the 
college authorities. Unexcused absence from a final examination constitutes 
a failure. 



30 



LENGTH OF ATTENDANCE 

Only in unusual cases may a student remain in the junior college 
for longer than four semesters, or in the teachers college for longer than 
eight semesters. Any requests for deviation from this plan must be sub- 
mitted to the Admissions and Standards Committee a month prior to the 
end of a semester. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A student wishing to withdraw should see the Dean of Students, who 
will provide the form needed to make the withdrawal oflScial. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of a student's record will be sent to other educational 
institutions and organizations only upon written request of the student 
concerned. The first transcript is issued free of charge. A charge of one 
dollar is made for each subsequent transcript and should be enclosed with 
the request. A supplement of one semester's work only will be furnished for 
fifty cents. Upon a student's graduation a transcript is sent to the Mary- 
land State Department of Education. When requested, transcripts are sent 
to the Baltimore City Department of Education. No charge is made at any 
time for transcripts sent to either of these departments in Maryland. One 
copy of the student's record marked "not an oflScial transcript" is fur- 
nished free to the student upon graduation. At any time, a student may 
have an unofficial copy on written request and payment of one dollar. It 
is not the poKcy of the college to issue official transcripts directly to stu- 
dents and graduates. 

A student who withdraws from the teacher education program before 
graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose of continuing his 
college education must first reimburse the college for whatever educa- 
tion he has received tuition-free (see LiabiUty For Unpaid Tuition page 19) . 

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

THE TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum of the teachers college includes courses of a general 
nature designed to produce cultured, well-informed citizens. It includes 
also professional courses designed to give students some competence in 
working with children. Opportunities are provided for students to spend 
considerable time in typical classrooms, first observing, then participating, 
and finally assuming complete responsibiUty for the direction of the class. 

Approximately three- fourths of the course offerings are in the sciences, 
the arts, the social sciences, and the humanities, which constitute the 
bases of a well-rounded college education. For the teachers this general 
education is important not only for personal satisfaction and individual 
adjustment, but also as a background to aid maturing individuals find their 
place in the world. 



31 



Students who are interested in a special subject field may take 
additional courses beyond the required work. There are several subject 
fields in which students may, with the guidance of their advisers, plan 
an area of concentration. These are: EngUsh, mathematics, psychology, 
science, social science and music. Such a concentration is helpful for 
those intending to do graduate work in these fields, and necessary for 
those planning to teach these subjects in the junior high school. Approx- 
imately fourteen hours of electives in a special field may be taken by any 
student. With the approval of the student's adviser, and the subsequent 
approval of the Committee on Admissions and Standards, additional 
hours may be taken in one field. Requirements for these areas of concentra- 
tion are described in connection with the courses of instruction of the 
respective departments. 

Some students, particularly those in the elementary and kindergarten- 
primary programs, may choose to broaden their general education rather 
than develop an area of concentration. In doing so they will select courses 
representing various fields of knowledge that will be of help to them as 
elementary school teachers. 

About one-fourth of the work at Towson is in the field of education, 
divided approximately equally between college courses and experiences in 
typical classrooms. The professional emphasis may prepare the student for 
kindergarten-primary, elementary or junior high school teaching. 

All students who satisfactorily complete the teachers college program 
quahfy for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

THE JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAM 

The junior college was inaugurated in September, 1946, with a 
curriculum comparable to the first two years of a liberal arts college. 
Courses are offered which will permit a student to transfer to various 
senior colleges without difficulty or loss of time. Physical education is re- 
quired each year, except for studnts who may be excused for health or other 
reasons by the Dean of Instruction. 

The professional fields to which a number of junior college students 
transfer include law, journalism, business administration, and other non- 
technical professions. It is usually advisable for a student planning a 
technical program such as medicine or engineering to transfer at the end 
of one year rather than two, as the curriculum at present does not pro- 
vide the special subjects needed in the second year. 

Some junior college students are interested in teaching but at the 
time of entrance are undecided about the level which they prefer. If 
such students decide to teach in senior high school, they transfer, after 
two years, to other colleges in Maryland where they may prepare for 
teaching the subjects of their choice. Junior college students who decide 
they wish to teach in the kindergarten-primary, elementary or junior high 



32 



school programs may apply for transfer to the teacher-education program 
of this college. All such applications for transfer must be presented to the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards. 

The degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to junior college students 
who satisfactorily complete a minimum of sixty- four hours of credit in an 
approved program. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements for 
graduation as set forth in the college catalog. When the requirements 
are changed after a student has enrolled in the college, the student has 
the option of meeting in full the requirements that were in effect at the 
time of entrance or those that are in effect at the time of graduation. 
The student's adviser assists in the planning of a program, but the final 
responsibility for meeting the requirements for graduation rests with the 
student. 

Teachers College 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements will 
receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. College credit of one hundred twenty-eight semester hours. 

2. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has elected. 

3. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

4. Fulfillment of the speech reqxiirement. (See page 30.) 

5. Certification by the college physician of ability to meet the 
physical standards required for admission to the retirement sys- 
tem of the State of Maryland. 

6. Record of attendance at the college for at least one college year 
during which thirty semester hours of credit were earned. A stu- 
dent is expected to earn his final 30 credits at the college unless 
he receives special permission to the contrary. 

7. A satisfactory demonstration of the qualities which are basic to 
the ethical standards necessary in the teaching profession. 

Junior College 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements will 
receive the Associate in Arts degree. 

1. College credit totaling sixty-four semester hours, including the 
following background work in the humanities, natural sciences, 
and social sciences: 

English 102-103 Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 6 credits 



33 



Art, Drama, Foreign Language, Music, Philosophy, 

Literature, Speech 2 to 6 credits 

Natural Sciences: Biological Principles, Physical 

Science, Chemistry, Physics 6 to 8 credits 

Social Sciences: Any course 100-300 level 6 credits 

Physical Education 4 credits 

Orientation to the Junior College credits 

Requests for exceptions to these requirements may be presented 
to the Admissions and Standards Committee, if they differ radi- 
cally from the requirements of the college to which the indivi- 
dual plans to transfer, or if other sufiicient reasons are presented. 

2. A cumulative average of at least 1.80. 

3. Record of attendance at the college for at least two semesters 
during which 30 semester hours of credit were earned. 

CERTIFICATES 

Each graduate of the State Teachers College is eligible to receive a 
Bachelor of Science Certificate in Kindergarten-Primary, Elementary, or 
Junior High School Education from the State Department of Education. 
This certificate is vaUd for teaching in the counties of the state for three 
years and is renewable upon evidence of successful experience and profes- 
sional spirit. 

Graduates who wish to teach in Baltimore City must take the pro- 
fessional examinations, the successful completion of which places them on 
the eligible list to teach in the eleinentary grades or junior high schools of 
the Baltimore City system. 

CURRICULUM PATTERNS 



The specific course requirements for a degree are outUned on the 
following pages. Students in the Kindergarten-Primary, Elementary, and 
Junior High School divisions will be assigned to Program A or Program B 
at the end of the freshman year and are expected to adhere to that pro- 
gram. Transfer students and others unable to meet graduation require- 
ments under the regular programs are urged to plan curriculum patterns 
during the first semester at the college in conference with the director of 
the division in which they plan to major. 



34 



REQUIRED COURSES 
KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY DIVISION 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the Teachers College 101-102 no credit 

ART 4 credits 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 14 credits 
Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Speech 122 2 credits 

EngUsh Literature 204 3 credits 

American Literature 307 or 308 

or Enghsh Literature 205 3 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 3 credits 

Personal Hygiene 105 1 credit 

Individual and School Health 305 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 3 credits 
Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 4 credits 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 credits 

Physical Education 101-102; 201-202 4 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Developmental Psychology I 205 3 credits 

SCIENCE 12 credits 

Biological Science 101-102 6 credits 

Physical Science 202-203 6 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 18 credits 

Elements of Geography 103-104 6 credits 

History of Western Civilization 121-122 6 credits 

History of the United States 221-222 6 credits 

EDUCATION 3 5 credits 

Developmental Psychology II 206 3 credits 

The Child and His Curriculum 340-345 12 credits 

Experiences with Music for 

Young Children 346 2 credits 

Reading Program for Young Children 347 2 credits 

Directed Teaching 303, 304 15 credits 

Seminar in Education 461 1 credit 

ELECTIVES 28 credits 

TOTAL SEMESTER CREDITS 128 



35 



REQUIRED COURSES 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DIVISION 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the Teachers College 101-102 no credit 

ART 4 credits 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 14 credits 
Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Speech 122 2 credits 

English Literature 204 3 credits 

American Literature 307 or 308 

or English Literature 205 3 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 3 credits 

Personal Hygiene 105 1 credit 

Individual and School Health 305 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 3 credits 
Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 4 credits 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 credits 

Physical Education 101-102; 201-202 4 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Developmental Psychology I 205 3 credits 

SCIENCE 12 credits 

Biological Science 101-102 6 credits 

Physical Science 202-203 6 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 18 credits 

Elements of Geography 103-104 6 credits 

History of "Western Civilization 121-122 6 credits 

History of the United States 221-222 6 credits 

EDUCATION 3 5 credits 

Developmental Psychology II 206 3 credits 

The Child and His Curriculum 361-364, 369 10 credits 

Art and The Child 371 2 credits 

Music and Elementary School Education 372 2 credits 

The Teaching of Physical Education in 

the Elementary School 373 1 credit 

Physical Education Activities 374 1 credit 

Directed Teaching 303,404 15 credits 

Seminar in Education 461 1 credit 

ELECTIVES 28 credits 

TOTAL SEMESTER CREDITS 128 



36 



REQUIRED COURSES 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the Teachers College 101-102 no credit 

ART 4 credits 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 14 credits 
Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Speech 122 2 credits 

English Literature 204 3 credits 

American Literature 307 or 308 

or Enghsh Literature 205 3 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 3 credits 

Personal Hygiene 1 5 1 credit 

Individual and School Health 305 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 3 credits 
Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 4 credits 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 credits 

Physical Education 101-102; 201-202 4 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Developmental Psychology I 205 3 credits 

SCIENCE 12 credits 

Biological Science 101-102 6 credits 

Physical Science 202-203 6 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 18 credits 

Elements of Geography 103-104 6 credits 

History of Western Civilization 121-122 6 credits 

History of the United States 221-222 6 credits 

EDUCATION 35 credits 
Field Studies on The Adolescent 

and His Commimity 250 1 credit 

Introduction to the Junior High School 359 4 credits 

The Adolescent and His Curriculum 

Psychology 207; Ed. 352, 355, 415, 461 10 credits 

Choices from 3 53, 3 54, 3 56, 3 57 4 credits 

Elective from 375, 379, 451, 452 1 or 2 credits 

Directed Teaching 303-404 15 credits 

ELECTIVES 28 credits 

TOTAL SEMESTER CREDITS 128 



37 



CURRICULUM PATTERN 

For The Degree In 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 



0.101 

1.103 
6.102 

6.122 
8.105 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



Semester I 
Orientation to Teachers 

College 

Fundamentals of Design 
Composition & Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech .... 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Music Appreciation 

Physical Education 1 

Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography 3 

History of Western 

Civilization 3 

Total 16 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Semester II 
0.102 Orientation to Teachers 

College 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design .... 2 
6.103 Composition & Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

6.122 Fundamentals of Speech 

8.105 Personal Hygiene 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.102 Biological Science 3 

30.105 Elements of Geography 3 

30.122 History of Western 

Civilization 3 

Total 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Semester I 
5.340-345 Education Block 12 

5.346 Experiences With Music 

for Young Children 2 

Electives 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 
SENIOR YEAR 
Semester I 
5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 
for Seniors 1 

5.347 Reading Program for Young 

Children 2 

Electives 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 

-PROGRAM A 

Semester II 
5.303-404 Directed Teaching 15 



PROGRAM A 

Semester II 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Elertives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 



38 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Eleaives 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

Electives 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Semester I 
5.303-404 Direaed Teaching 15 



Semester II 

5.340-345 Education Block 12 

5.346 Experiences with Music for 

Young Children 2 

Electives 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



PROGRAM B 

Semester II 
5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.347 Reading Programs for 

Young Children 2 

Electives 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 

Note 1: To meet the requirement of 128 hours for graduation, students are ex- 
peaed to complete an average of 16 hours each semester. They may carry from 15 
to 17 hours without approval of the Admissions and Standards Committee. Blanks 
for requesting permission to carry fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be ob- 
tained in the Registrar's Office. 

Note 2 : Students may choose to use their eleaives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may select an area of concentration in the department 
of English, mathematics, science, or social science. For three of these departments 
the following special considerations are pointed out: 

English — students in the kindergarten-primary division will select Program 
B in the sophomore year and will take English in place of the three-hour elective 
in Semester I. 

Mathematics — students in the kindergarten-primary division preferring a con- 
centration in mathematics would need to defer American History to the junior 
year or obtain permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Science — students in the kindergarten-primary division choosing concentration 
I in science would need to defer American History to the junior year or obtain 
permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Note 3: All transfer students entering teachers college will be required to take 
5.103 Orientation for Transfer Students. No credit. 



39 



CURRICULUM PATTERN 



For The Degree In 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Semester I 



Semester II 



0.101 Orientation to Teachers 

College 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design 

6.102 Composition and Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 



8.104 
6.122 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



Fundamentals of Speech 

Music Appreciation 

Physical Education 1 

Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography .... 3 
History of Western Civili- 
zation 3 

Total 16 



0.102 Orientation to Teachers 

College 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design .. 2 

6.103 Composition and Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

6.122 Fundamentals of Speech 

8.105 Personal Hygiene 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.102 Biological Science 3 

30.104 Elements of Geography 3 

30.122 History of Western Civili- 
zation 3 

Total 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17-202 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.221 American History 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

30.222 American History 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A 

Semester I Semester II 

5360-369 Education Block 10 5.303-404 Direaed Teaching 

5.372 Music in Elementary School 

Education 2 

5.373 The Teaching of Physical 

Education in the Elemen- 
tary School 1 

Elertives 3 or 4 

Total 16 or 17 

SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A 



15 



Semester I 

5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.371 Art and The Child 2 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Eleaives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

5.374 Physical Education Activi- 
ties 1 

Electives 11 or 13 

Total 15 to 17 



40 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Elertivss 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17203 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Eleaives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

5.374 Physical Education Activi- 
ties 1 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

Electives 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

5.360-369 Education Block 10 

5.372 Music in Elementary School 

Education 2 

5.373 The Teaching of Physical 
Education in the Elemen- 
tary School 1 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 
5.303-404 Directed Teaching 15 



Semester II 
5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.371 Art and The Child 2 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Eleaives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 

Note 1 To meet the requirement of 128 hours for graduation, students are ex- 
peaed to complete an average of 16 hours each semester. They may carry 15 to 17 
hours without approval of the Admissions and Standards Committee. Blanks for 
requesting permission to carry fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained 
in the Registrar's Office. 

Note 2 Students may choose to use their electives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may selea an area of concentration in the department 
of English, mathematics, science, or social science. For three of these departments 
the following special considerations are pointed out: 

English — Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in 
English will selea Program A in the Sophomore year. 

Mathematics — Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in 
mathematics would need to defer American History to the junior year or obtain 
permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Science — Students in the elementary division choosing Concentration I in 
science would need to defer American History in the junior year or obtain per- 
mission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Note 3 All transfer students entering Teachers College will be required to take 
5.103 Orientation for Transfer Students. No credit. 



41 



CURRICULUM PATTERN 



For The Degree In 
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Semester I 



Semester II 



0.101 

1.103 
6.102 

6.122 
8.105 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



Orientation to Teachers 0.102 

College 

Fundamentals of Design 1.103 

Composition and Intro- 6.103 

duaion to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech .... 2 6.122 

Personal Hygiene 1 8.105 

Music Appreciation 13.103 

Physical Education 1 16.102 

Biological Science 3 17.102 

Elements of Geography .... 3 30.104 

History of Western Civili- 30.122 

zation 3 

Total 16 



Orientation to Teachers 

College 

Fundamentals of Design .... 2 
Composition and Intro- 

duaion to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Personal Hygiene 

Music Appreciation 2 

Physical Education 1 

Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography .... 3 
History of Western Civili- 
zation 3 

Total 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM A* 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17-202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 
5.250 Field Studies on the Ado- 
lescent and His Com- 
munity 1 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Eleaives 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A 



Semester I 
8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

Electives 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

5.395 Introduction to Junior 

High School 4 

Electives 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



* Program B is identical to Program A except that "Field Studies on the 
Adolescent and His Community" is taken in the first semester. 

** Program B is identical to Program A except that "Introduction to 
Junior High School" is taken in the first semster. 



42 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A and B* 



Required Courses 

5.303-404 Directed Teaching .... 15 

5.352 Language Arts in the Jun- 
ior High School 2 

5.355 Measurement in the Jun- 
ior High School 2 

5.415 Audio- Visual Workshop .... 2 
20.207 Adolescent Psychology 3 

5.461 Senior Seminar in Princi- 
ples and Problems of 
Education 1 



Methods Courses (choose two) 

5.353 The Teaching of Science in 

the Junior High 

School 2 

5.354 The Teaching of Social 

Studies in the Junior High 
School 2 

5.356 The Teaching of English 

in the Junior High 

School 2 

5.357 The Teaching of Mathemat- 

ics in the Junior High 
School 2 



Electives 

5.375 Physical Education Aaivi- 
ty for the Junior High 
School 

5.379 Guidance in The Public 

School 

5.451 Core Techniques in the 

Junior High School 

5.452 Workshop in Creative Ac- 

tivities for the Junior 
High School 



Note 1 : To meet the requirement of 128 hours for graduation, students are expect- 
ed to complete an average of 16 hours each semester. They may carry from 15 to 17 
hours without approval of the Admissions and Standards Committee. Blanks for 
requesting permission to carry fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained 
in the Registrar's Office. 

Note 2 : Students may choose to use their eleaives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may select an area of concentration in the department 
of English, mathematics, science, or social science. 

Note 3 : All transfer students entering the teachers college will be required to take 
5.103 Orientation for Transfer Students. No credit. 



* Students in Program A do their "Directed Teaching" in the first and 
third quarters. Those in Program B do their "Directed Teaching" in the 
second and fourth quarters. 



43 



SUGGESTED COURSE PATTERNS 
FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

General Arts and Science* 

(By choosing proper electives students may prepare for later specialization in 
fields such as Humanities, Social Studies, Science, Mathematics.) 



Pirsf Year 



Sem. Hrs. 



Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin. 
or 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 2 

or 

Elective 2-3 

**Mod. Lang. Elements or Inter- 
mediate French, German 
or Spanish 6 

P.E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 121-122 Hist, of 

"Western Civilization 
or 

Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of 

the United States 6 

**Mod. Language Intermedi- 
ate, Advanced 6 

Eleaives (Mathematics, Soc. Sci., 
English, Music, Art, 
etc.) 12-14 

P. E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



32-34 



32-33 



Pre-Nursing* 



First Year 



Sem. Hrs. 



Or. 109-110 Orientation to the Jr. 

College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Sod Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 2 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

**Mod. Lang. Elements or Inter- 
mediate French, German 

or Spanish 6 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



32 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of the 
United States 
or 
Soc. Sci. 121-122 Hist, of West. 

Civilization 6 

Psych. 201-202 General Psy- 
chology 6 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 
**Modern Lang. Intermediate, 
Advanced 
or 

Eleaives 6 

P. E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



32 

•These patterns may be followed to prepare students to continue their studies in a 
number of Maryland colleges and universities. They may be varied, however, in 
accordance with requirements of the institution to which they plan to transfer. 

**lf a new language is started in the freshman year it is usually continued in the 
sophomore year; if the intermediate course is taken in the freshman year, a student 
has the choice of taking a third year of language or using these hours for electives 
in other fields. 



44 



Pre-Law* 



First Year Sem. Hrs, 

Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit. 6 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

See. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin. 
or 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 2 

**Mod. Lang. Elements or 

Intermediate French, 
German or Spanish 6 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of the 

United States 6 

* *Mod. Lang. Intermediate, 

Advanced 6 

Electives 12 

P. E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



32 



32 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Or Business Administration* 

(Students planning to follow these programs may be advised to transfer at the end 
of one year in the junior college in order to get necessary specialized subjects in 
the second year. Additional courses in science and mathematics have been added 
that may provide a second year.) 



Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental 

Sem. Hrs. 
Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

English 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 
Math. 111-112 College Algebra, 

Trig, and Analytics 6 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



Business Administration 

Sem. Hrs. 
Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

Math. 105-106 Business Math., 

Math, of Finance 6 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Soc. Sci 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 
or 

Elective 2-3 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32-33 

*These patterns may be followed to prepare students to continue their studies in a 
number of Maryland colleges and universities. They may be varied, however, in 
accordance with requirements of the institution to which they plan to transfer. 

**If a new language is started in the freshman year it is usually continued in the 
sophomore year; if the intermediate course is taken in the freshman year, a student 
has the choice of taking a third year of language or using these hours for electives 
in other £elds. 



36 



45 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



THE MEANING OF COURSE NUMBERS 

Each department of the college has a code number, shown in paren- 
theses at the head of the department announcement. Each course 
has a distinctive number, with the following significance: Courses 
numbered 100-199 inclusive are primarily for freshmen, 200-299 
primarily for sophomores, 300-399 primarily for juniors, and 400-499 
primarily for seniors. Students may register for courses one level 
above or one level below their classification. Seniors are expected to 
confine themselves to 300 courses and higher, unless the curriculum 
pattern for the degree specifies particular 200 courses in the senior year. 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a hyphen 
are to be taken in sequence throughout a year. When course numbers 
are separated by a comma, either semester may be taken independently 
of the other. 



a COURSES 

For all courses numbered with the addition of the letter "a" the fol- 
lowing explanation apphes: for the additional credit hour students are 
required to do extra work in areas of special interest under direction 
of the instructor. 

Permission to register for any course carrying the letter "a" must be 
obtained from the instructor of the course at registration time only. 
A student electing the additional hour credit may not change the 
value of the course after the second week of the semester. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Students normally may elect 14 or IJ of the 28 elective credits in 
one department. They may exceed 14 or 15 without special permission 
whenever (1) one credit of the last course taken is needed to bring 
the credit to 14 in that department or (2) the total number of 
semester hours exceeds 128. 

Students feeUng the need of more than 14 or 15 hours in building an 
area of concentration may request permission of the Admissions 
and Standards Committee to earn additional hours after obtaining 
approval of their adviser. 

TIME OF OFFERING 

A course is offered every semester of every year, unless the semester 
or the semester and year of offering is specified. All non-required 
courses are offered subject to sufficient enrollment. 



46 



NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

Coixrses for which there is no organized department in the college 
are: 

101-102 ORIENTATION TO THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

2 hours per week, two semesters. {No credit.) 

An introduction to social and academic aspects of college living, with 
individual and group guidance leading to more effective use of the educa- 
tional opportunities offered by the college. 

Through a series of experiences in observation and participation with 
children ranging from kindergarten through junior high school in pubUc 
schools in the Baltimore metropohtan area, students are introduced to the 
purposes and practices of public education. 

109-110 ORIENTATION TO THE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

One hour a week for one semester and at least six -meetings during the sec- 
ond semester. (No credit.) 

Lectures and discussions on: study habits and budgeting of time: note 
taking; reading skills; general education and history of junior college 
movement; rules and regulations of the college; grading system; graduation 
requirements; career opportunities and planning. 

During the second semester representatives of various professions and 
colleges are invited to the college to participate in career conferences which 
aid junior college students in making plans for their careers and further 
study after completion of the junior college program. 
(Required of all junior college freshmen unless excused by the Dean of 
Instruction.) 

302 RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICA 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Ideas, forms of organization and emphasis of Protestantism, Cathol- 
icism and Judaism; trends in religious thought as related to American 
culture. (The third credit may be earned by satisfactory completion of a 
research project.) 

302a Same as 302. 2 hours per ti/eek. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

401 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of issues and movements in contemporary philosophy in the 
light of representative thinkers of the major schools of thought, and a con- 
sideration of their significance. Emphasis will be placed on a critical 
examination of influential works. 

Open to teachers college juniors and seniors who have had History 
121 or its equivalent, and to graduate students, by permission of the 
instructor. 



47 



ART (1) 

Mr. Miller (Chairman;, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Nass, Mr. Pollack, 

Miss Zindler. 

The art courses provide students with means for self-expression, 
contribute to the growth of appreciation, and stimulate cultural pursuits. 
Design as related to our contemporary environment is stressed. Theories 
of art education are explored. Museum visits and field trips supplement 
classroom work. 

103 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An investigation of line, form, color, texture, spatial relationships. 

203 ART IN THE CULTURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Design in architecture, craft, plastic and graphic arts of contempo- 
rary civihzations. The interaction between these and other forces which 
mold the culture. The expressive possibiHties of many materials. 

210 DRAWING AND THE APPRECIATION OF DRAWING 

3 hours per -week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

An investigation of the problems of expressive draftsmanship in 
theory and practice. 

212 LIGHT, FORM, AND THE RECORDED IMAGE 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

An introduction to contemporary expression in photography and re- 
lated areas; ie. photomontage, collage, and photograms. 

214 ENAMELING ON METAL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-1960. 

A practical acquaintance with essentials of the art of enameling on 
copper and silver. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203 

220 THE HISTORY OF ART: ANCIENT THROUGH 

RENAISSANCE 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The development of art theory, forms and materials as seen in 
historical perspective. Readings, museum trips and research. Emphasis 
upon Renaissance art and its origins in ancient and medieval forms. 



48 



221 HISTORY OF ART: BAROQUE THROUGH 
CONTEMPORARY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The origins of contemporary art as revealed by the 17th, 18 th, and 
19th centuries. Museum trips and study of contemporary collections. 

310 DESIGNING WITH MATERIALS 

4 hours per tveek. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A study of the art possibilities of wood, clay, plastics, cloth, paper, 
paint and dye, and the use of tools necessary to their development. 

320 EXHIBITION TECHNIQUES 

3 hours per ti/eek. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

Materials, techniques and methods for the aesthetic presentation of 
educative materials for all levels of teaching. The design of bulletm 
boards, exhibit spaces, display tables, and the staging of assembly and 
hohday programs. 

320a Same as 320. 4 hours per tveek. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

330 BEGINNING PAINTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A general studio course emphasizing expression in painting. Many 
media are investigated and different theories of painting explored through 
lecture, discussion and individual work. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203, or consent of the instructor. 

331 CERAMICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The creative possibilities of ceramic clay. Lectures and discussions 
on materials, technique and design. Museum trips. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203, or consent of the instructor. 
340 BEGINNING SCULPTURE 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Introduction to the materials of sculpture, and an investigation of 
their special quaUties as they relate to the creative process. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203, and consent of the instructor. 
371 ART AND THE CHILD 
3 hours per ti/eek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 371. Description on page 53. 



49 



414 SPECIAL ART PROBLEMS 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Practice for advanced students in their fields of special interest. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

420 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A study of major art education problems at all levels. Materials and 
skills in relation to classroom needs. Participation with children in the 
developing, planning, and carrying through of projects. 

Prerequisite: 371. 

EDUCATION (5) 

Mr. Abendroth, Mr. Anderson, Miss Broyles, Mr. Burrier, Mr. 

CORNTHWAITE, MiSS FiTZGERALD, Mr. HARTLEY (ChAIRMAN), MiSS 

Heagney, Mr. Holler, Mr. Moser, Mr. Saxton, Miss Smith, Mrs. 
Velie, Mr. Williamson. 

Faculty members from other departments participate in teaching the 
education courses. 

The teacher education program provides many opportunities for 
students to work with and study children. Professional laboratory ex- 
periences begin in the freshman year and are an integral part of the work 
of each of the succeeding years. During the junior and senior years the 
study of children continues and broadens to include experiences in observ- 
ing and teaching different age groups in several schools. As students ac- 
quire a background in the social and natural sciences and the arts, and 
gain skill in communication, they learn to make these function in their 
teaching. 

COURSES IN KINDERGARTEN AND 
PRIMARY EDUCATION 

340 THE CHILD AND HIS CURRICULUM 
13 hours per week. {Credit 12 hours.) 

A series of interrelated experiences in college classes and in nearby 
pubKc schools, dealing with problems of the teaching-learning process 
from kindergarten through third grade. Experiences in teaching and 
learning in the early grades are provided in the following areas: 

341 THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY CURRICULUM 
4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours — Part of 12 hour course.) 

Research and experimentation in human growth and development 
analyzed and evaluated in terms of the individual's needs, interests, and 



50 



responsibilities. Participation one day each week throughout the semester 
in the classrooms of nearby public schools. 

342 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRI- 
MARY GRADES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Tart of 12 hour course.) 

Research and guided learning in listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Ways o£ teaching beginning reading and writing. 

343 ARITHMETIC IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 12 hour course.) 

Readings, discussions and observations to discover stages in the de- 
velopment of children's ability to perform quantitative thinking. Students 
will select, design and evaluate learning activities that enlarge, structure 
and enrich the number concepts of young children. 

344 WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE EXPERIENCES 

3 hours per tueek. {Credit 2 hours — Fart of 12 hour course.) 

Activities designed to aid in the understanding of the creative process. 
Class discussion. Experiments with various art materials, melody, oral and 
written language, and rhythmic movement. 

345 SCIENCE IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Fart of 12 hour course.) 

The use of school and community resources in developing the child's 
ability to use and understand science ideas. Ways in which a child's natural 
curiosity may be guided toward an exploration and understanding of funda- 
mental scientific concepts. 

346 EXPERIENCES WITH MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Ways in which experiences with music promote self-expression and 
self realization. Singing games, singing, rhythmic movement, and rhythm- 
band activities. Class discussion and laboratory work with children. 

347 READING PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Exploration of special interests arising out of field experiences in the 
teaching of reading. 

Prerequisite: Education 342. 
To be taken following student teaching. 



51 



303 and 404 DIRECTED TEACHING 
(Credit 15 hours.) 

Teaching experience on the campus or in nearby public schools. Op- 
portunities to observe teaching, participate in work with children, teach in 
the kindergarten-primary, elementary, or junior high schools, and engage 
in all other activities for which regularly employed teachers are responsible. 

Individual and group conferences with teachers and supervisors. 

COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

360 THE CHILD AND HIS CURRICULUM 
10 hours per week. {Credit 10 hours.) 

Planned and directed experiences to help the student see the school 
in relation to the community, providing a background for planning with 
children and for eA'^olving a program with them. The principles of teaching 
and learning are developed through activities in the following areas: 

361 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Vart of 10 hour course.) 

Furnishes the student with a background of information and tech- 
niques upon which he may draw in assisting pupils to interpret trends in 
modern life. Locating, organizing, synthesizing, and interpreting funda- 
mental social information. (Listed for 3 credits as Education 525 in the 
summer session bulletin. ) 

362 SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 10 hour cotirse.) 

The significance of science for the elementary school child and its 
contribution toward his development. Criteria for selecting science ex- 
periences for children for curriculum construction, and evaluating their 
results. (Listed for 3 credits as Education 524 in the summer session 
bulletin. ) 

363 ARITHMETIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 10 hour course.) 

The kinds of arithmetic; the nature of meaning in arithmetic; 
core mathematical ideas running through elementary mathematics; research 
findings in the teaching of arithmetic; organization of units of instruction; 
evaluation of pupil progress. (Listed as Education 523 in the summer ses- 
sion bulletin.) 

364 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours — Part of 10 hour course.) 

A study of the language needs and abilities of children. Ways of devel- 



52^ 



oping children's abilities to use language more eflFectively in reading, 
writing, speaking, and listening are evaluated. Emphasis is placed upon 
reading instruction. (Listed as Education 521 in the summer session 
bulletin.) 

369 THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour — Vart of 10 hour course.) 

The values and needs of our society, the developmental tendencies 
and tasks of children, the organization and sequence of school activities. 

371 ART AND THE CHILD 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The major considerations of art education appropriate to the elemen- 
tary school. Experiences in planning and teaching art. Work in classroom 
and workshop. Discussion and demonstrations. (A similar course for 

2 or 3 credits, Art in the Elementary School, is listed as Education 534 or 
538 in the summer session bulletin.) 

372 MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Acquaints the student with music programs in the elementary school. 
Skills developed to carry on singing, listening, instrumental, rhythmic 
and creative experiences with children. Observation and practice. One 
hour per week class discussion and two hours laboratory. (Listed for 2 or 
3 credits as Education 537 or 539 in the summer session bulletin.) 

373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Observation and participation at the Lida Lee Tall School. One hour 
devoted to planning and preparation and one to practice. (Required for 
students in elementary education. Open to other students as an elective.) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

374 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Practice in activities suitable for use in teaching. (Required for 
students in elementary education. Open to other students as an elective.) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The aims and outcomes of the physical education program, and the 



53 



selection and use of materials which contribute to the accomplishment of 
the objectives. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

430 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL — ADVANCED 
COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work in music in the elementary school. Examination 
of courses of study in use. Evaluation of materials and procedures current 
in school music teaching. Consideration of music activities in their 
relation to an integrated program. Creative work. 

Participation in the planning and carrying out of musical projects 
in the Lida Lee Tall School. 

Prerequisite: Music 103, 203. 
303 and 404 DIRECTED TEACHING 
{Credit 15 hours.) 

Course described on page 52. 

COURSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
EDUCATION 

The program of education for junior high school teachers is de- 
signed to bring about a closer integration between methods courses and 
the practical experiences of observation and student teaching. All students 
receive methods instruction and study the junior high school child while 
engaged in a program of active participation in typical teaching situations. 

250 FIELD STUDIES ON THE ADOLESCENT AND HIS COM- 
MUNITY 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

A study of community agencies serving the needs of youth. Individual 
projects provide study and work with people of junior high school age. 

3 59 INTRODUCTION TO THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

The purpose of education, curriculum development and organization, 
nature of the junior high school program and educational experiences, 
group planning and work, and principles of teaching and learning. 

3 52 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The oral and written communication of ideas in the junior high 



54 



school. Reading, composition, penmenship, spelling, library visage, and 
work-study skills. 

353 THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The selection of appropriate content, method, and evaluation tech- 
niques, and the analysis of textbooks and resource materials. Demonstration 
teaching methods are developed and practiced. 

354 THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Current curriculum trends. Materials, methods and activities and 
their organization for classroom use. The special methods applicable to 
the teaching of history, geography and citizenship, as well as integration, 
correlation and the core program. 

35 5 MEASUREMENT IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Problems in measurement; principles underlying choice of test in- 
struments; survey of test literature; administering, scoring, and recording 
test data; interpretation of test norms; construction of informal tests. 

356 THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The teaching in the junior high school of written and spoken ex- 
pression in the light of experimental findings and modern practice. 

357 THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The aims and purposes of mathematics instruction. An examination 
of courses of study and text books in mathematics for the junior high 
school, presenting some of the scientific techniques of instruction in 
mathematics. 

375 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE JUNIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Methods of teaching sports, track and field stunts, combatives, 
rhythms, relays, and mass games. 



379 GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Group readings and discussions of the scope and function of a 
guidance program; the role of the guidance speciaUst; the function and 
purpose of the counseling interviews; the kinds and uses of guidance 
forms, reports, and records; vocational and educational guidance. 

402 JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in junior high school 
books apart from school textbooks, aid the student to obtain a better 
working knowledge of this hterature, and increase his awareness of degrees 
of excellence in content and form. 

415 AUDIO- VISUAL WORKSHOP 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

Practical experience in the operation of audio-visual apparatus, in 
preparation of teaching aids and in the apphcation of modern tools 
of learning in the classroom. Field trips, still pictures, fihnstrips, motion 
pictures, graphic devices, records, radio and television. 

Required of and open only to students majoring in junior high school 
education. 

451 CORE TECHNIQUES IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Designed to help prospective core teachers develop understandings 
of the philosophy, organization, content, and methods of core and to 
build skills necessary in various types of core programs. 

452 WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR TfiE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Planning, participating in, and evaluating junior high school activities 
that utilize art, music, and drama skills which may be employed to meet the 
needs of individual pupils, vitalize group learnings, clarify concepts, and 
build desirable appreciations. 

303 and 304 DIRECTED TEACHING 

{Credit 15 hours.) 

Course description on page 52. 

GENERAL COURSES IN EDUCATION 

103 ORIENTATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS 



56 



1 hour per week for one semester. (No credit) 

Similar to the second semester of Orientation 101-102 and required 
of all students transferring from the junior college or other colleges who 
have not had such a course. Includes visits to elementary and junior high 
schools, reviews of movies and film strips, and discussions led by representa- 
tives of kindergarten-primary, elementary, and junior high programs. 

3 1 S AUDIO- VISUAL MATERIALS AND METHODS OF INSTRUC- 
TION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Methods for vitalizing learning through the use of pictures, school 
trips, motion pictures, radio, television, records and transcriptions. The 
location of materials, operation of apparatus, preparation of pupil- and 
teacher-made tools of learning and presentation of concrete materials. 

331 HISTORY OF EDUCATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Assists the student in the organization, interpretation, and evaluation 
of his professional experiences in the light of the origin and development of 
organized education. 

401 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Children's books apart from school textbooks are examined to provide 
a better working knowledge of this hterature, and to increase awareness 
of degrees of excellence in content and form. 

For undergraduate credit only. 

405 FIELD STUDIES ON THE CHILD AND HIS COMMUNITY 

2 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The structure and functions of social agencies and their relationships 
to school practices and theories of child socialization. Planning and work- 
ing with groups of children in approved social agencies or making intensive 
studies of recreational and non-recreational social agencies, depending 
on the student's background. Class discussions and field trips. 

426 METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF READING INSTRUCTION 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

For students who have completed student teaching and wish further 
work in developing the elementary school pupil's reading abilities. Con- 
cerned chiefly with the principles involved in building a sound develop- 
mental reading program. Some attention given to methods of remedial 
reading. 

426a Same as 426. 2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 



57 



461 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF 

EDUCATION 
1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

A workshop to help solve the professional problems of the teacher 
facing his first job. 

307-310 INTEGRATED PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCA- 
TION 
{Credit 8 hours.) 

An overview of the elementary school curriculum, with emphasis 
upon the language arts, social living, and related activities in other areas. 
Acquaints students with classroom routines and procedures. Daily obser- 
vation of experienced teachers working and planning with groups of 
children at different grade levels. Specialists discuss and demonstrate 
activities, materials, and procedures in music, art and physical education. 
(Summer Session only.) 

325 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 
[Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of the processes of human growth, development, learning, and 
behavior, with implications for planning group experiences and activities 
and meeting the needs of individual children. (Summer Session only.) 

326 PURPOSES AND PRACTICES IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

{Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of the purposes of the elementary school programs, the areas 
of growth for which the school is responsible and modern practices for 
realizing the goals of the educational program. (Summer Session only.) 

ENGLISH (6) 

Mr. BEvnsrs (Chairman), Mr. Brewington, Mrs. Brewington, 
Miss Crabtree, Mr. Frost, Mr. Guess, Miss Hughes, Mr. Kramer, 
Mr. Lewis, Mrs. Sargent, Mr. Somers, Miss Thearle, Mr. Wright. 

The English program provides the student with experiences in the 
appreciation of literature, present and past, and affords opportunities for 
self-expression in written and spoken forms. 

Fourteen semester hours of credit in English are required of teachers 
college students. The required courses are: 102-103 Composition and 
Introduction to Literature, 122 Fundamentals of Speech, 204 English Lit- 
erature, and one course selected from these: 205 English Literature, 307 
American Literature, 308 American Literature. 



58 



AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN ENGLISH 

EMPHASIS IN LITERATURE 

The specific purposes of English as an area of concentration with an 
emphasis in Uterature are to give comprehensive introductions to the fields 
of English and American literature, presenting Uterature in historical per- 
spective and acquainting the student with major works and writers of the 
English language; to give as electives advanced courses in hmited areas, 
allowing the student to concentrate in the study of particular literary 
figures, types, and ideas; and to discover the resources and practice the 
methods of research. 

The following courses are required for this concentration: 102-103 
Composition and Introduction to Literature; 122 Fundamentals of Speech; 
204, 205 English Literature; 307, 308 American Literature. The emphasis 
in literature is completed by the selection of eight hours from literature 
courses in the department. 

EMPHASIS IN SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 

The specific purposes of English as an area of concentration with an 
emphasis in speech and dramatics are to train and develop the student in 
the skills of oral communication and dramatic arts; to develop an 
appreciation for the aesthetic values in the art and literature of oral per- 
formance; and to develop a critical abiUty in evaluation of the speech arts. 

In addition to the fourteen hours of EngUsh and Speech required of 
all students, those completing an emphasis in this field must take 327 
Voice and Phonetics and 275 Play Directing. Five or six hours must be 
selected from the following: 218 Public Speaking; 223 Speech and the 
Classroom Teacher; 278 Acting; 304 Oral Reading and Interpretation; 
377 Stagecraft; 276 Stage Make-up. Two or three credit hours must be 
selected from other courses in the department. (315 Shakespeare; 316 
Shakespeare; 321 Contemporary Drama; 324 Development of the English 
Drama are recommended.) 

LITERATURE 

* 102-103 COMPOSITION AND INTRODUCTION TO LITERA- 
TURE 
3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A review of grammar, the writing of compositions, and reading of 
various forms of literature. A research paper required in the second semes- 
ter. Students needing additional help in EngKsh may be placed in small 
sections meeting five instead of three hours a week. 

English 102-103 is prerequisite to all other courses in composition 
and literature in the department. 

*If a student has a superior record on his entrance examination and 
if he is recommended by the English Department as a candidate for exemp- 



^9 



tion from English 102, he may request an examination to exempt him from 
that course. The student will not receive credit for English 102 but will 
be allowed to take another EngUsh course to make up for these three 
exempted hours. 

204 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work of major writers in English literature from 
Chaucer through Blake. 

205 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work of major writers in Enghsh literature from 
Wordsworth through T. S. EUot. 

224 THE SHORT STORY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The development of the short story, with attention to changing 
forms, techniques, and subject matter. 

22 5 AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A critical reading from the literary point of view of important 
American biographies and autobiographies. 

231 ADVANCED EXPOSITION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60, Second 
Semester 1960-61. 

Practice in such types of expository writing as definition, process, 
analysis, the documentary, criticism and review, and research. 

332 ADVANCED GRAMMAR 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60, Second 

Semester 1960-61. 

Enghsh grammar, usage and sentence structure on an advanced 
level. 

233 ELEMENTS OF POETRY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Versification (meter, rhyme, rhythm, diction and figurative lan- 
guage) and the forms and purposes of poetry. 



60 



307 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the major writers in American literature from the 
Colonial Period to Walt Whitman. 

308 AMERICAN LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the major writers in American literature from Walt 
Whitman to the present. 

315 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Shakespeare's development as a poet and a dramatist during the period 
of the comedies and historical plays. 

316 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A detailed study of the great tragedies and the late romantic comedies. 

319 CONTEMPORARY POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 
A study of the work of important twentieth century poets. 

320 CONTEMPORARY NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60, 
Second Semester 1960-61. 

A study of the work of important twentieth century novelists. 

321 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The critical reading of plays of the late nineteenth century and the 
twentieth century. 

323 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN NOVEL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The history and development of the American novel from the begin- 
ning to 1900. 

324 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60, 
Second Semester 1960-61. 

The history and development of English drama from the Middle Ages 
to the nineteenth century. 



61 



326 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 
Second Semester 1960-61. 

Greek and Roman mythology. Some attention to the use of mythology 
in English and American literature. 

328 HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The chief books of The Old Testament and The Apocrypha studied 
from a literary and historic point of view. It is not a course in theology. 

333 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

European writings in translation from the time of Homer to the 
Renaissance. 

334 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

European writings in translation from the Renaissance to 1900. 

383 IMAGINATIVE WRITING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The art of imaginative expression. The writing of articles and short 
stories and other creative forms. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

384 NEWSPAPER WRITING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 
Techniques of writing for the newspaper. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

405 HISTORY OF CRITICISM 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The history and principles of literary criticism. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60, 
Second Semester 1960-61. 



62 



The history and development of the English Novel from the begin- 
nings to 1900. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of Hterature beyond the freshman year. 

430 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
2 hours per tueek. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The changes and reasons for the changes in grammar, sound, and 
vocabulary of the language, from Old English to modern times. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of literature beyond the freshman year. 
SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 

100 CORRECTIVE SPEECH 

2 hours per week. {No college credit.) 

A course that must be passed by teachers college students who have 
defective speech. Must be taken before teaching is begun. 

*122 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The sound of spoken language, the principles and practice of public 
speaking, and the art of oral reading. 

* If a student demonstrates in a performance test the ability to do the 
work of English 122, he will be permitted to choose whether or not he 
wishes to take advanced work in speech or an elective in any other field. 

218 PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The theory of pubhc address and practice in speaking to a classroom 
audience. Selection and organization of subject, language, bodily action, 
pronunciation, and voice. 

Prerequisite: 122. 

275 PLAY DIRECTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The theory and practice of play directing. Analysis of plays 
for production, play casting, and the process of rehearsal. Each 
student makes a director's study of some specific play and has opportunities 
for practice. 

276 TECHNIQUES OF MAKE-UP FOR DRAMATIC PRODUC- 
TIONS 

1 hour per ti/eek. {Credit 1 hour.) Second Semester. 

Principles and practices of stage make-up. Approximate supply cost 
$4.00. 



63 



278 ACTING 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The theory and practice of acting. Constant practice in the analysis 
of characters, the creation of roles, and the rehearsal of short scenes. Im- 
provisations. 

300 SPEECH CORRECTION AND THE CLASSROOM TEACHER 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The educational principles that govern attitudes toward exceptional 
children in general, and speech and hearing handicapped children in 
particular. 

Each student spends one hour per week in the College Speech and 
Hearing Chnic for Children. 

304 ORAL READING AND INTERPRETATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

General principles of oral reading, and the art of interpretation in 
poetry, drama, and the short story. 

Prerequisite: 122 and consent of the instructor. 

327 VOICE AND PHONETICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

An advanced course in the study of voice production and phonetics. 
Individual practice and drill in speech sounds and acceptable spoken 
language. Electrical recordings of voice and speech. 

Prerequisite : 122. 

377 STAGECRAFT 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Visual elements of play production, including the theory of stage de- 
sign, construction of scenery, costuming, stage effects and lighting. (The 
third hour will be earned by 20 hours' work on college productions.) 

379 ELEMENTS OF CHILDREN'S THEATER 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A course concerned with the elements required to effectively stage 
plays with children and for children through the junior high level. 

Each student will be required to devote time for rehearsals with the 
children. 



64 



LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 342. Course description on page 51. 
LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 364. Course description on page 52. 
LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 3 52. Course description on page 54. 
ENGLISH IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for 9 weeks. 

Credited as Education 3 56. Course description on page 5 5. 
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 40 L Course description on page 57. 

JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 402. Course description on page 56. 

HEALTH EDUCATION (8) 

Miss Bize (Chairman), Mr. Reitenbach, Miss Ward. 

The Health Education courses deal with the basic needs of the human 
organism for healthy growth and development. The courses stress not 
only the responsibiHty of the individual for maintaining his own health 
and contributing to that of others, but also the function of the teacher in 
influencing and guiding pupils in healthy living. 

105 PERSONAL HYGIENE 

1 hour per week. (Credit 1 hour.) 

Introduction to personal health with emphasis on health problems of 
the college freshman. 

305 INDIVIDUAL AND SCHOOL HEALTH 
3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Individual and school health problems and practices with elements of 
anatomy and physiology as a basis for understanding. 



65 



310 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN PUBLIC HEALTH 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the principles and practices in the field of public health, 
and the organization and administration of various agencies. Major public 
health problems considered. 

320 ADVANCED FIRST AID 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

The mechanism of shock, artificial respiration, traction spHnting, 
splinting of fractures of lower extemities, transportation of injured, 
treatment of common medical emergencies. American Red Cross advance 
certificate awarded upon successful completion of course. (For a Red 
Cross instructor's certificate, 19 class meetings are required.) 

Prerequisite: 305 or Standard First Aid Certificate. 

405 SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Materials for the teaching of health, the place of health in the school 
program and coordination of the work of teachers and school health 
services. Techniques for encouraging desirable health habits and for ob- 
serving the health of the child in the classroom. 

Prerequisite: 105 and 305. Open only to juniors and seniors. 

MATHEMATICS (11) 

Miss Archer, Mr. Mueller, Mr. Volpel (Chairman) . 

All students, including transfer students, who matriculate in the 
teachers college are required to take the course in Fundamental Concepts 
of Arithmetic. All other courses in mathematics are electives, open to both 
teachers college and junior college students. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN 
MATHEMATICS 

In order for a student to acquire an area of concentration in math- 
ematics he should elect 110 Intermediate Algebra or 1 1 1 College Algebra 
in the first semester and 112 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry in the 
second semester of the sophomore year. The required 204 Fundamental 
Concepts of Arithmetic should also be taken in the sophomore year. 

Nine semester hours of elective courses to make the required total of 
eighteen hours may be chosen from the following: 105 Business Mathemat- 
ics, 106 Mathematics of Finance, 210 Basic Statistics, 313 Differential 
Calculus, and 314 Integral Calculus. 



66 



105 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Provides a practical knowledge of and develops a computation skill in 
basic problems of business. Reviews mechanics of computation and fun- 
damentals of problem solving and covers topics involving taxes, wages, 
interest, discount, business ownership, retailing, insurance, and securities. 

106 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A sequel to Business Mathematics. Considers compound interest and 
discount, amortization, sinking funds, valuation of bonds, depreciation, 
annuities, and elements of insurance. 

Prerequisite: 105, or consent of the instructor. 

110 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

For students with inadequate background in the subject. A thorough 
treatment of the elementary topics of algebra through quadratic equations. 
Not open to students with credit in 111. 

111 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

A review and extension of basic algebraic principles, concepts, and 
skills. Includes logarithms, theory of equations, variation, progressions, 
complex number, probability, and determinants. Not open to students 
with credit in 110. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school algebra or consent of the 
instructor. 

113 TRIGONOMETRY AND ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

Topics in trigonometry and triangulation, identities, polar coordinated 
and trigonometric equations; topics in analytic geometry are the straight 
line, conies, transformation of coordinates, and higher plane curves. 

Prerequisite: 111, or consent of the instructor. 

210 BASIC STATISTICS 

2 hours per tveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Analysis and interpretation of data, measures of central tendency 
and variability, rank and correlations. (For the student with limited 
mathematical background.) 



67 



204 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ARITHMETIC 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A mature treatment of the basic concepts of arithmetic. Origins of 
number, structure of a positional number system, principles underlying 
the fundamental operations, and computation with approximate numbers. 

Not open to students in the junior college who are seeking transfer 
credit to other colleges. 

313-314 CALCULUS, DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hotirs.) 

First semester: variables, functions and Umits; differentiation of alge- 
braic and transcendental functions; applications to maxima and minima, 
time rates and motion, curvature; partial differentiation, theorem of mean 
value. 

Second semester: integration, the definite integral, integration as a 
process of summation, apphcations to physics and geometry, series, ex- 
pansion of functions, and multiple integrals. 

Prerequisite : 111-113, or consent of instructor. 

ARITHMETIC IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY GRADES 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 343. Course description on page 51. 

ARITHMETIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 363. Course description on page 52. 

THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 357. Course description on page 55. 

MODERN LANGUAGES (12) 

Miss Tansil, Mr. von Schwerdtner (Chairman). 

While the main function of the Department of Modern Languages 
is to offer to junior college students courses suitable for transfer to liberal 
arts colleges, students in the teachers college may also avail themselves 
of these offerings. 

121-122 FRENCH ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 



68 



221-222 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; translation 
of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the 
ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: French 121 and 122 or equivalent. 

111-112 GERMAN ELEMENTS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

211-212 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

3 hours per week for ttvo semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; transla- 
tion of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the 
ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: German 111 and 112 or equivalent. 

101-102 SPANISH ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

201-202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

3 hours per week for ttvo semesters {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; translation 
of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the abUity 
of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 and 102 or equivalent. 
ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES 

According to demand, the following courses on the advanced level 
may be given: French 321, German 311, and Spanish 301 — Novel and 
Short Story; French 322, German 312, and Spanish 302 — Drama and 
Poetry; French 323, German 313, and Spanish 303 — History of Liter- 
ature with collateral reading of the French, German, or Spanish classical 
authors, in the original. 
Each course 3 hours per week for 1 semester. {Credit 3 hours.) 

French 324, German 314, and Spanish 304 — Advanced Conversa- 
tion. 
2 hours per week for 1 semester. {Credit 2 hours.) 

French 325, German 315, and Spanish 305 — Advanced Composition. 
1 hour per week for 1 semester. {Credit 1 hour.) 



69 



MUSIC (13) 

Mr. Bollinger, Mr. Duro (Chairman), Miss MacDonald, Mr. 
Haslup, Miss Weyforth. 

The music program aims to acquaint students with music, as con- 
sumers, through hearing it and reading about it; and as producers, through 
singing and playing. Through music, students have opportunities for self- 
expression in a social medium. It will be their privilege as teachers to bring 
similar opportunities to children. 

COURSES AT THE PEABODY 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

The State Teachers College has developed a plan of aflSliation with the 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, which will enable the student at Towson 
to continue serious music study during his college program. It will also 
enable him to accomplish some of the work required for special music 
teaching. Qualified students may take as many as fourteen elective credits, 
for the most part in applied music, at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

Since considerable practice is required for advanced study at the Con- 
servatory, students receiving permission to study there should plan to carry 
hmited course loads at State Teachers College and some would need to 
spend additional time at the college to complete degree requirements, 
through summer sessions or extra semester. 

Students wishing to take music lessons or a course in harmony should 
obtain approval for such registration, first through the Chairman of the 
State Teachers College Music Department and second, through the Dean 
of the Peabody Conservatory. This should be done in the semester pre- 
ceding registration for music. Students are expected to present a receipt for 
payment of the Peabody course when they come for registration at State 
Teachers College. 

(Tuition fees and credit hours to be adjusted.) 

103 MUSIC APPRECIATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A survey course in music literature. The elements of music (rhythm, 
melody, and harmony) together with tone color and form and their sig- 
nificance. Folk and art songs, opera, symphony, and tone poems. One hour 
per week class discussion and two hours experience with music through 
phonograph records, movies, concerts, radio and television. 

203 MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS 

3 hours per tveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Understanding music and its elements through singing, playing of 
various instruments, and rhythmic expression. Students grouped according 
to their musical abiUties and individual differences. One hour per week 
class instruction and two hours of individual and group activities. 



70 



212-213 WOMEN'S CHORUS 

1 J4 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for two consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of choral literature written and arranged for 
female vocies. 

217-218 MEN'S CHORUS 

1 Y2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for two consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of choral literature written and arranged 
for male voices. 

305 CREATIVE MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A basic course in composing and arranging for choral assemblies and 
instrumental combinations. 

306 HARMONY AND EAR TRAINING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Melody writing for instruments and voice, with and without 
accompaniment. Musicianship is developed through keyboard harmony 
and melodic dictation. 

307 TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A survey of the music of outstanding composers in the twentieth 
century. 

308 INSTRUMENTAL CLASS AND ENSEMBLE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

Class instruction in orchestral instruments on the elementary, inter- 
mediate, and advanced levels. 

314 CLASS PIANO 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Class instruction in piano playing, designed to encourage participation 
in musical activity for personal expression. 

Five hours per week out-of-class preparation required. 

Open to beginning students and students with less than one year's 
piano instruction. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

3 1 1 ENSEMBLE SINGING, SIGHT SINGING, AND CONDUCTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Group instruction in voice and song interpretation. Ear training and 
sight reading of many unison and part songs. Individual and group per- 
formance. Conducting. Participation in The Glee Club is expected. 



71 



313 AMERICAN MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A survey of types of American music from the Colonial period 
to the present with discussion of derivative and original sources. 

315 HISTORY OF MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

An historical study of the development of music in the western world. 

209-210 GLEE CLUB 

1J4 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for 2 consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of choral literature. Maximum of 3 points 
may be earned in Glee Club and/or Orchestra. (See Musical Organizations, 
page 25 for extra-curricular aspects of this work.) 

215-216 ORCHESTRA 

lYz hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for 2 consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of orchestra, Uterature. A maximum of 3 
points credit may be earned in Glee Club and/or Orchestra. (See Musical 
Organizations, page 25, for extra-curricular aspects of this work.) 

372 MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 372. Course description on page 53. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (16) 

Miss Bize (Chairman), Mrs. Bleul, Miss Daniels, Miss Gil- 
coYNE, Mr. Killian, Mr. Melville, Mr. Minnegan, Miss Roach. 

The physical education program provides for the development of 
skills and understandings for satisfying participation in sports and in- 
formed spectatorship, and development of interest in active outdoor 
recreation. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION — First semester: 101, 201. Second Semester: 
102, 202. 

2 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

An introduction to physical education activities to provide the 
student a foundation for using them intelHgently, and for a systematic 
approach to other and more advanced activities, while helping the student 
to develop and maintain physical fitness and ability in the fundamental 
skills. 



72 



INDIVIDUAL GYMNASTICS 

Work in individual gymnastics for all students. Individual and group 
conferences. The work continues until the student shows progress in 
understanding and demonstration of good posture. This is part of the 
course 101-102. 

310 RECREATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Preparation for leadership and organization of after-school activities 
for children such as club, hiking, camping and playground activities. 
Visits to recreation centers. Specialists in story telhng, crafts, recreational 
singing, playground, and club work give part of the course. Participation 
in some organized recreation with children. 

373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 
Course description on page 53. 

374 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Course description on page 53. 

375 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

An elective in basic physical education activities. Methods of teaching 
sports, track and field, stunts, combatives, rhythms, relays, and mass games. 

410 RHYTHMS AND DANCING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Preparation for teaching rhythms and dancing. Analysis of funda- 
mental dance rhythm, creation of simple dance patterns, singing games 
and types of accompaniment, selection of appropriate material for various 
age levels, preparation of dance material for festival and holiday programs, 
and recreational dancing. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A consideration of the aims of the physical education program, 
appropriate outcomes for diflFerent age levels and the selection and use of 
materials that contribute to the accomplishment of these objectives. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 



73 



PSYCHOLOGY (20) 

Miss Clarke (Coordinator), Mr, Mann, Mr. Moser, Mr. Neu- 

LANDER. 

Society requires of teachers to whom it entrusts its children that they 
become able to exercise sympathetic understanding, wise guidance, and 
intelligent direction of the growing child to the end that he may become 
a well-adjusted personahty and an asset to his community. Psychology 
claims as its responsibiUty the promotion of growth in the understanding, 
prediction, and control of human behavior. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The purpose of the area of concentration in psychology is to pro- 
vide a planned selection of elective courses beyond the psychology 
requirement of six semester hours. Students may select an area of con- 
centration for the following reasons: 

1. In order to become more effective teachers. 

2. In order to prepare for teaching in the fields of special education. 

3. In order to prepare for further study at the graduate level in the 
behavioral sciences. 

4. In order to further their general education in the behavioral 
sciences at the undergraduate level. 

Required courses are 202, 205, 206, or 207. The area of concentration 
will be completed by the selection of 1 1 or 12 elective hours in psychology. 

201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The problems, methods, facts and principles of psychology. General 
principles of psychological development; learning, remembering and 
thinking; motivation of behavior; perception; feeUng and emotion; 
measurement of individual differences. Open to junior college students 
only. 

203 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Research methodology and simple experimentation illustrating the 
subject matter of general psychology and human growth and development 
and the use of the experimental method. Demonstrations and experiments 
in learning, sensory experience, feeling and emotion, individual differences, 
measurement of personality traits. 

Prerequisite: For Junior College students 201. For Teachers' College 
students planning to take a concentration in psychology 205 and 206 
(207). Psychology 202 may be taken concurrently with Psychology 206 
(207). 



74 



205 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Principles, facts and methods of psychology useful in explaining 
human behavior and experience. The developmental aspects of growth 
and behavior as they pertain to children and adolescents. Observation, 
the writing and interpretation of records, and special readings. 

206 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY II 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

This course offers an opportunity for further development of skills 
and abilities begun in Psychology 205. The emotional development and 
motivational processes from childhood through adulthood considered 
in the light of their influence upon personality development. The impact 
of cultural and societal demands upon the growing child and his methods 
for meeting these demands. Observation and interpretation of child 
behavior and personality development. 

Prerequisite: 205. 

207 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Physical, emotional, intellectual development during adolescence; 
social development and heterosexuahty; adolescent personality; problems 
of adjustment; juvenile deUnquency; guidance of adolescents. 

308 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Learning as adjustment; forms of learning; experimental data con- 
cerning the fundamental nature and conditions of learning. Teaching and 
learning; procedures helpful for improving learning efficiency; transfer 
of training. 

322 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

A study of human relationships. The factors inherent in the structure 
and function of groups. Recent advances in sociology, anthropology, clini- 
cal psychology and psychiatry. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 

323 PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The mental equipment of individual children. Degrees of retardation 
and their causes, disorders of behavior which frequently are concomitant, 
and the psychological bases of a suitable curriculum for mentally retarded 
children are considered. The causes and consequences of emotional distur- 
bance in children, and the special needs of children with serious emotional 



75 



problems are outlined. The characteristics and needs of the gifted child 
together with special problems in development, motivation, and learning, 
and their impKcations for educational provisions are considered. 

402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

An introduction to educational and psychological testing and evalua- 
tion. The construction, administration, interpretation and use of the 
various evaluative devices of achievement, aptitude, intelUgence, interests 
and personaHty. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 

403 MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

General nature of motivation; theories of emotion; motivation and 
emotion in the structure of personaHty; social implications. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-207) 
403a Same as 403. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

404 PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 

3 hotcrs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of individual differences in human traits and characteristics, 
methodology, basic principles, and major findings in research. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-207), 202, and a course in Statistics 
or Tests and Measurement. 

405 PERSONALITY, ITS ANALYSIS, DEVELOPMENT, AND 
EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Examination and appraisal of several theoretical approaches to the 
study of personahty, including behaviorism, typologies, semantics, need 
theory, psychoanalysis. Facts and theories of sensation, and perception with 
attention to their role in the total psychology of the individual and to 
current appUcations. Methods of personaHty evaluation according to 
different conceptual frameworks, including practice in personaHty assess- 
ment and analysis. 

Prerequisite: 205-206 (205-207). 

420 MENTAL HYGIENE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The functions and processes of adjustment as related to mental 
health, main problems of Hfe to which adjustment is made, and the nature 
of conflict. Guest lecturers, movies, and field trips. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 



76 



502 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Study of the principal theoretical systems with emphasis on modern 
schools of behaviorism, gestalt, psychoanalysis, perception, structuralism, 
fimctionalism and purposive psychology. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-207) or the equivalent. 

502a Same as 502. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

503 SEMINAR IN SELECTED PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Investigation of selected problems from various fields of psychology 
that are of current educational significance. Students with special interests 
wiU have the opportunity to choose problems with psychological implica- 
tions. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-207) or the equivalent. 

SCIENCE (17) 

Mr. Bareham, Mr. Cox, Mr. Crook, Mr. Hathaway, Mr. Muma, 
Miss Odell, Mr. Pelham (Chairman), Mr. Ravelli, Mr. Rubendall, 
Mr. Stewart, Mr. Stringer, Mr. Yarbrough. 

The curriculum in science helps students to understand their natural 
environment and the scientific phenomena which are part of their every- 
day lives. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN SCIENCE 

CONCENTRATION I 

This concentration is for students desiring to teach science in the 
junior high school and for others desiring more intensive preparation in 
science. The following courses are required: 101-102 Biological Science, 
206-207 General Chemistry, 211-212 General Physics. Students must 
elect science courses totaling four to six credit hours to complete this 
concentration. 

Students selecting this concentration are excused from the general 
requirement of 202-203 Physical Science. 

CONCENTRATION II 

This concentration is for students with a general interest in science. 
Courses required for this concentration are: 101-102 Biological Science, 
202-203 Physical Science. To complete the concentration students must 
elect, with the advice of members of the department, fourteen credit 
hours in science courses. 



77 



The biology course should be taken first in each concentration. The 
sequence for physics and chemistry in Concentration I should be deter- 
mined in consultation with the adviser in the department. 

101-102 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

First semester: general characteristics of living things, a survey of 
the animal kingdom, life histories of representative animals, and a compar- 
ison of the morphology and physiology of frog and human organ systems. 

Second semester: embryology, genetics, a survey of important plant 
phyla and life histories, modern interpretations of organic evolution, and 
principles of ecology and conservation. 

104-105 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

First semester: general characteristics of Hving things, physiology 
and anatomy of vertebrate systems as represented by the frog and man, 
parallel study of human nutrition and embryology, and a survey of the 
animal kingdom based on its evolutionary significance. 

Second semester: genetics, modern interpretations of organic evolu- 
tion, and a survey of important plant phyla. Two hours of lecture and four 
of laboratory. 

202-203 PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

The general procedures and characteristics of modern physical 
science. In the first semester a definition and examination of energy; in 
the second a consideration of modern physics, astronomy, and historical 
geology. 

206-207 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

A study of the principles and theories of modern chemistry. Chemical 
laws, physical constants, theories of solutions, ionization, valency, and 
structure of matter. An experimental and problem approach. Two one- 
hour lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

211-212 GENERAL PHYSICS 

6 hours per tveek for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

For junior college students, students concentrating in junior high 
school science teaching, and students desiring further background in 
science. Includes mechanics, heat, sound, Hght, electricity, magnetism, 
and an introduction to nuclear physics. Three one-hour lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: Registration in Mathematics 1 1 1 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 



78 



302 BOTANY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The basic concepts of plant taxonomy, physiology, and ecology 
through laboratory and field experiences coupled with discussions and 
lectures. Emphasis on plants most common to the local environment 
and techniques most useful to an understanding and enjoyment of them. 
Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

303 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Study of fresh, brackish, and salt water species of major phyla from 
the Protozoa through the Arthropoda (except the insects) with special 
emphasis on local forms. Economic, ecological, and taxonomic considera- 
tions. Field trips for collections. Two one-hour lectures and one two- 
hotu: laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

304 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A comparative study of vertebrate animals, their structure, natural 
history, and relationships, by means of dissections, lectures, and discus- 
sions. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

305 CONSUMER AND COMMUNITY SCIENCE 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

How the basic principles of science are transferred from an academic, 
laboratory backgound for appKcation in the production, testing and 
purchase of consumer goods and in the function of community projects. 
Field trips. 

308 QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) First Semester. 

The principles of chemistry studied in Chemistry 206-207 ampKfied 
and appHed to the detection of common metallic and nonmetallic ions. 
Two one-hour lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

Prerequisite: 206-207 or its equivalent. 

310 FIELD NATURAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Life in its various forms, in various environments and the 
relationship of these forms to one another and to man. Lectures, discus- 
sions, laboratory work, and field observations. 



79 



310a 4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 
312 INTRODUCTORY AVIATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Basic principles of flight theory and control, aircraft and engine 
construction, navigation, weather information processing, air traffic con- 
trol, and C. A. A. regulations. MiUtary, political, and economic implica- 
tions of aviation. Field trips, laboratory work, and Link Trainer instruction 
optional and subject to the instructor's approval. 

312a 2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

Field trips, laboratory work, and Link Trainer instruction required. 

314 ORNITHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A laboratory and field course in bird identification, structure, behav- 
ior, ecology, and general economic relationships. Emphasis on the birds 
of the Baltimore area. Migration and individual bird movements at tha 
U. S. Government approved Banding Station estabUshed on the campus. 
One one-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. 

314a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

315 ENTOMOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A laboratory and field course in the study of insects. Recognition of 
the more common orders, and a study of their structure, behavior, ecology, 
economic importance, and control. 

315a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

318 MICROBIOLOGY 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 
1959-60. 

For prospective teachers and junior college students expecting to 
major in some phase of the biological sciences. Designed principally as a 
laboratory course investigating such groups of organisms as bacteria, 
protozoa, and lower plant forms. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

320 GENERAL ASTRONOMY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The present knowledge of the earth, moon, sun, planets, comets, 
meteors, stars and galaxies, and the methods by which this knowledge has 
been attained. Lecture. 

Not open to students who have had 202 (Physical Science) . 
320a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

Lecture and problems. 



80 



324 GEOMORPHOLOGY 

4 hours per tueek. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The study of land forms, their orgin and the processes whereby they 
are modified. Field work in the local community. Two one-hour lectures 
and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103. 

392 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A laboratory and field course conducted by the conservation staff of 
the Maryland Department of Research and Education under the direction 
of the science department, providing information on such natural 
resources as water, soil, forests, game, and fisheries. Field trips. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104 and Biology 101-102 or 104-105, 
or recommendation of the science department. 

SCIENCE IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY GRADES 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 345. Course description on page 51. 

SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 362. Course description on page 52. 

SCIENCE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 3 53. Course description on page 55. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE (30) 

Mr. Beishlag, Miss Blood (Chairman), Mr. Blumberg, Mr. 
Coleman, Mr. Diffenderfer, Mr. Falco, Mr. Firman, Mr. Helle- 
EUCH, Miss Huck, Mr. Hutson, Mr. Johnson, Miss Kahl, Mr. Mar- 
tin, Mr. Matthews, Mr. McCleary, Mr. Onion. 

Eighteen semester hours of credit in the social sciences are required 
for teachers college students. The required courses are: 103-104 Elements 
of Geography, 121-122 History of Western Civilization, and 221-222 
History of the United States. 



81 



AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Students may select an area of concentration in social science with 
emphasis in history, geography, or social studies. The purpose of the area 
of concentration is to provide a planned selection of elective courses be- 
yond the social science requirements of eighteen semester hours in general 
education. Although a major is not provided in one field, prospective 
teachers may develop greater proficiency in history, geography, or social 
studies. Those who are preparing to teach history, geography, and the 
social studies in the junior high school should check carefully the require- 
ments for certification. 

EMPHASIS IN HISTORY 

Three to six credit hours must be selected from the electives in soci- 
ology, economics, political science or geography. Eight to twelve hours 
must be selected from the electives in history. 

EMPHASIS IN GEOGRAPHY 

Three credit hours must be selected from the electives in sociology, 
economics or political science. Eleven or twelve hours are required from 
the geography electives. 

EMPHASIS IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

Those who wish this more general emphasis must take nine credit 
hours as follows: 301 Introduction to Sociology, 305 Introduction to Eco- 
nomics, 306 Government of the United States. Five to six additional hours 
must include one elective in geography and one other course in the social 
science department. 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY 

103-104 ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Elements of the physical environment and the changes resulting from 
the operation of both human and natural agencies; regional studies with 
emphasis upon interrelations between the physical environment, and 
plant, animal and human life; map reading and interpretation. 

309 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Areal distribution and character of the economic activities in various 
Latin American countries in relation to physical and cultural features. 
Resources and problems of their development; importance of foreign 
trade to the economy; relationships with the United States. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-1 04. 



82 



310 GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The common social, economic and political interests of the major 
regions of the United States. The culture patterns of each region in 
relation to the natural settings in which they have developed. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

311 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A regional analysis and appraisal of the human geography and natural 
resources of Europe. Problems of nationality, economic development, and 
cultural conflicts. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

314 GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The principal human and economic resources and problems of Asia. 
Analysis of agriculture, industrial development, poKtical problems, and 
their relation to current world aflfairs. Emphasis on China, India, and Japan, 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

316 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The regional distribution of the world's resources, industries, and 
population with emphasis upon problems of international trade. An analy- 
sis of the productive and extractive industries, manufacturing, and com- 
merce in relation to the geographic environment. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

318 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

A regional analysis of the natural resources and human geography of 
Africa. Problems of economic development, nationality and cultural con- 
flicts. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

319 GEOGRAPHY OF THE USSR 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The regional diversity, natural resources, industrial and agricultural 
areas, and other factors bearing on the Soviet Union as a world power. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 



83 



320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) 

Political, social and economic development of the state and its rela- 
tions to major events in the development of the nation. Natural resources; 
regional land use; industrial development, particularly in the Baltimore 
area. Field trips. Field trip expenses about $15, payable when trips are taken. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104; History 221-222. 

330 GEOGRAPHY LABORATORY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

Practical exercises in cartography, statistics, and field techniques. 
Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

331 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

An analysis of the effect of poHtical groupings on man's use of the 
world, and of the influence of the geographic base on political power. 
Treatment is world-wide and covers both large powers and small countries. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 
331a Same as 331. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A geographical analysis of urban settlements and the problems pre- 
sented by them. Field study of a typical urban community area. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

430 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Reading and research in selected problems in the field of geography. 

Prerequisite: At least 12 hours of geography and approval of in- 
structor. 

COURSES IN HISTORY 

121-122 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

The development of western man as a social being from post-Roman 
Europe to the present. 

221-222 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 



84 



A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural forces which 
have shaped the pattern of life in the United States. Emphasis is placed 
upon the origins and development of American democracy. 

260 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT WORLD 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The development of early Stone Age Man, the rise and fall of the 
ancient civiHzations, and the emergence of Germanic Europe. 

303 SURVEY OF ENGLISH HISTORY TO 1783 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The evolution of the poKtical, legal, social, economic and cultural 
institutions of England and the spread of England overseas. The triumph 
of ParHament over the monarchy and the development of the Rights of 
Englishmen. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122, 

304 BRITISH HISTORY SINCE 1783 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The struggle against France, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of the 
bourgeoisie to poHtical control, the spread of empire, the symbolism of 
the Victorian era, and the evolution of democratic process. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

304a Same as 304. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

312 EUROPE SINCE 1914 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Events leading to World War I, the course of the conflict, and the 
peace which followed. The rise of conflicting political ideologies between 
wars; the origins, strategies, and results of World War II. The material 
achievements of the modern age. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 
Course description on page 84. 

326 RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The economic, social and political history of the United States since 
1914 as it affects the present status and future development of the 
American people. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 



85 



333 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) First Semester 1959-60. 

The history of American economic development from the colonial 
period to the present with an emphasis upon trends and problems of con- 
temporary importance. 

Prereqmsite: History 221-222 

352 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

The history of American foreign policy from the Revolutionary "War 
to the present designed to build an understanding of present problems of 
international relations. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 
352a Same as 352 {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

354 INTELLECTUAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The development of social and intellectual life from the 17th century 
to the present. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 
354a Same as 354. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

361 MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The principal currents of social and intellectual development in 
medieval Europe with particular attention to pohtical and social theory, 
economic patterns, and the church and major religious movements. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 

362 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

The social and intellectual changes in "Western Europe between 
1350 and 1650 which mark the transition from medieval to the modern 
world. Special attention to background development and impact on 
"Western culture. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 
362a Same as 362. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

363 EUROPE 1648-1815 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 



8^ 



The European State system — political changes within and relations 
between its various units — studied with reference to the expansion of 
Europe civilization, intellectual growth and class relationships which cul- 
minated in the French Revolution and Napoleon. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

364 EUROPE 1815-1914 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The major economic, poUtical, social, and intellectual currents of the 
period, stressing the effects of the industrial revolution, the development 
of nationahsm and imperiahsm, the origin of the first world war. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

365 HISTORY OF ASIA SINCE 1500 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The social, political, and cultural institutions of the major Asian 
powers from early modern times. The impact of Western civilization 
upon Asia, the crisis of the 20th century and current problems of that area. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

370 RUSSIA SINCE 1800 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Russian development since 1800, stressing the poUtical and economic 
conditions which form the background for the revolution of 1917. 
An analysis of the Soviet Regime, 1917 to the present. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 
370a Same as 370. (Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

420 PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

A reading and research course dealing with a particular phase of 
history with considerable attention to sources and historiography. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122; 221-222 and approval of instructor. 

421 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A detailed study of selected problems in the Revolutionary and 
Constitutional periods. The technique and methodology of historical 
research and writing. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 and approval of instructor. 



87 



COURSES IN ECONOMICS, POLITICAL 
SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY 

ECONOMICS 

305 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Contemporary economic problems. The development of business 
organizations; production and pricing; the banking system; and national 
income and its distribution. 

315 PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF ECONOMICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Economic principles and problems with particular emphasis on pubUc 
finance, agriculture, population growth, labor, international trade, and 
comparative economic systems. 

Prerequisite: Economics 305. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

306 GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The structure and functions of the government of the United States 
and the problems involved in the extension of the scope of democratic 
government in our contemporary life. 

307 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The policies pursued and methods used by states in attempting to 
achieve their objectives in relations with other states. Sovereignty, power 
poUtics, balance of power, imperiaHsm. The organization and role of the 
United Nations in international relations. 

Prerequisite : Geography 103-104 and History 121-122. 

308 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF FOREIGN POWERS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A comparative survey of the constitutional and legal processes of 
England, France, Russia, Italy, Germany, China and Japan. Some attention 
to the smaller social-democratic states of Europe. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

3 51 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1959-60. 

Political thought in the West from the Greeks to the present, em- 
phasizing the great poUtical thinkers, the intellectual movements in polit- 
ical theory, and their role in shaping the ideologies of the present world. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 



88 



3 53 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1959-60. 

Origin and development of the American two-party system. The 
activities of pressure groups and organizations, and the ensuing eflFects 
upon the party system. 

3 5 5 THE LATIN AMERICAN POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Diplomatic and cultural relations between the United States and 
Latin America. The Pan-American Movement, implementing the Monroe 
Doctrine, and the advent of the Good Neighbor Policy. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222. 

3 55a Same as 3 5 5. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 46. 

SOCIOLOGY 

301 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The development of group life of man. Patterns of individual 
and group behavior, social interaction, the rise and diffusion of culture 
elements, custom and fashion, caste and social classes, patriarchal and 
matriarchal societies, folkways, family and tribal organization. 

344 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The growth and development of the human adult and the problems 
of physical, mental and social adjustment in conjugal life. This course 
is carried on in cooperation with other departments of the college as well 
as with social agencies of the community. (Open to juniors and seniors 
only. ) 

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 361. Course description on page 52. 

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 3 54. Course description on page 55. 



89 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

PURPOSE 

The Master of Education program is intended to help successful, cer- 
tified Maryland elementary school teachers to improve their professional 
qualifications. Although built around a core of required courses, the 
program will be tailored to suit the needs and interests of the individual 
as indicated by (a) his undergraduate record, (b) the demands of his 
position as a classroom teacher, and (c) the considered judgments of his 
supervisors, employers, and college teachers. Since the program is planned 
primarily for teachers in service, the courses are offered principally during 
the summer session and in the evening. 

OBJECTIVES 

1. To help successful teachers continue to develop understandings 
and appreciations characteristic of broadly educated individuals. 

2. To enable teachers of professional promise to increase their com- 
petence as teachers. 

3. To increase the student's appreciation of the role of the teacher 
and of education in our complex world order. 

4. To provide a deepening and functional understanding of human 
growth and development. 

5. To encourage a spirit of inquiry and to develop an acquaintance 
with recent studies in one's field of interest. 

6. To assist teachers in building more effective ways of working w^ith 
students, professional colleagues, and residents of their commun- 
ity. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to courses is granted in order of receipt of applications 
to those presenting transcripts showing graduation with a B average, 
or better, from a regionally accredited college or university, and with 
a teaching record to date that is of promising quality. 

If additional individuals can be accommodated, conditional admission 
may be granted to appUcants (1) whose transcripts of previous coUege 
study are not immediately available, (2) whose baccalaureate degree is 
from an tmaccredited institution, (3) whose undergraduate program did 
not qualify for a standard teaching certificate in Maryland, or (4) lacking 
an undergraduate average of B, may present a satisfactory score on the 
National Teachers Examination or the Graduate Record Examination. 

Special admission may be granted, if room is available, to college 
graduates not planning to work toward a master's degree. 

The admission procedure is as follows: 



90 



1. Obtain an application form from the Director of Admissions, 
Graduate Division. 

2. Fill out and return the form to the Admissions Office (Graduate 
Division) and request the registrar of each college previously at- 
tended to send a transcript to the Director of Admissions. 

3. Await a call from the college for an appointment w^ith a 
member of the graduate council or admissions staff. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE 

Those wishing to become degree candidates should make apphcation 
to the Dean of Instruction after their completion of six semester hours of 
graduate courses with a B average and not later than the second summer 
of attendance. Other considerations upon which favorable action will be 
based are: completion of two or more years of meritorious service as a 
teacher, tentative approval of a degree program by the faculty adviser, and 
a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record or National Teacher Examina- 
tion. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

A. Completion of an approved program of at least thirty semester 
hours and a B average. 

B. Completion of an approved special project or projects. 

C. Distribution of courses so that not fewer than six nor more than 
fourteen of the elective hours are in either professional or general 
courses. 

D. Satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination cen- 
tering about the student's special area of interest. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level work may be 
transferred from other accredited institutions. 

TIME LIMITATION 

All work credited toward the master's degree must be completed 
within a seven-year period. 

STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 

The graduate student should be mentally and physically healthy as 
well as socially mature. To insure the achievement of these objectives, the 
following are being developed as part of the Towson graduate program: 
(1) Selective admissions, (2) cumulative records, (3) counseling, (4) 
health services, (5) a varied activities program, (6) financial aid, and 
(7) assistance with placement. 

Although independent planning and study along with cooperative 
group work with other students is emphasized, each graduate student will 



« 13654^; 



have a faculty adviser. If possible, the adviser will be the faculty member 
preferred by the student. After admission to candidacy two more faculty 
members will be appointed to form the student's advisory committee. The 
student must have the signature of his advisor for each registration. 

GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES 

At least one-half of the student's courses must be at the 500 level, 
designed exclusively for graduate students. Other courses may be taken at 
the 400 level (open to juniors and seniors), but the instructor will expect 
graduate students to do graduate level work in these courses. 

Seniors in their final semester may request permission to register for as 
many as five semester hours of 500 level if they are within five semester 
hours of completing their baccalaureate degree requirement and if their 
undergraduate work has been of sufficiently high calibre. (These five hours 
may count toward the master's degree if they are in excess of the baccala- 
reate degree requirement.) 

THE REQUIRED CORE OF COURSES 

5.505 EDUCATIONAL IDEAS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) {Offered each summer and occa- 
sionally during the winter when there is sufficient demand.) 

Current trends and issues in education as reflecting and influencing 
the social, economic, and political forces in our cultural heritage. (Students 
should include this course among their first six semester hours in the 
program. ) 

5.506 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Offered 1959. 

A study of research as a method for solving problems. Contributions 
of research to education. Research processes and procedures. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Tests and Measurements, 
or Elementary Statistics, or consent of instructor. 

5.506 CRITIQUE OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (involving 
either the general field of elementary education or a special area 
related to the student's interest.) 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A follow-up of Introduction to Research in which each student is 
expected to survey critically certain pubHshed research in the field of 
education. 

20.501 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT—. 
ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



91 



An advanced course designed for graduate students who have had a 
basic course in Human Growth and Development or Child Psychology. 

A study of the basic factors in the development of human behavior 
with an emphasis on social-cultural learning. The nature and conditions 
of learning as related to physiological, psychological, and sociological devel- 
opment are studied in the hght of school practice. A review of contempor- 
ary theories of learning and their curricular imphcations. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following courses will be scheduled for one evening a week 
during the academic year, or during the six-week summer session, in 
accordance with demands indicated by (a) written requests and (b) 
preregistrations conducted by the college. For course descriptions see 
Courses of Instruction beginning on page 46. 

Art 420 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 
4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 426 METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF READING 
INSTRUCTION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Education 426a Same as 426. See page 46. 
2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 405 HISTORY OF CRITICISM 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

English 422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 430 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Health 405 SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Philosophy 401 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Physical Education 420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



93 



Psychology 420 MENTAL HYGIENE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 430 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN GEOGRA- 
PHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 420 PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Social Science 42 1 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

EXPENSES - GRADUATE 

The tuition cost is $10.00 per semester hour. There is a registration 
fee of $2.00. 

During the summer session a weekly fee of $10.00 includes room and 
two meals a day (breakfast and dinner) Monday through Friday. Luncheon 
may be purchased in the cafeteria. Meals will not be served on the week- 
ends. Students may, of course, occupy their rooms over the week-ends 
and take meals outside. A fee of $2.50 for the use of service rooms and 
mail box will be charged summer resident students. 

In addition to the above expenses, there will be only those for books 
and incidental expenses. 

Fees are due on registration day and at the time of registration for 
those who register by mail. By special arrangements board may be paid 
in two installments. A fee of $5.00 is assessed for those who failed to 
complete registration by the time of the j&rst class meeting. No late 
registrations will be accepted after the third day of a session. 



94 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

AND TRUSTEES OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

President'. "Wendell D. Allen, Baltimore 

Vice-President ; Jerome Framptom, Jr., Federalsburg 

Secretary and State Superintendent of Schools: Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Members: Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Chevy Chase 
William A. Gunter, Cumberland 
DwiGHT O. "W. Holmes, Baltimore 
Mrs. Richard Marcus, Pikesville 
George C. Rhoderick, Middletown 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

' Earle T. Hawkins, President 
-Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 
' Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 
'Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 
■'Agnes T. Debauch, Acting Registrar 
vKarl J. Moser, BiLsiness Manager 
* Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 
i Faynelle Newland, Director of Residence Halls 
V Mariana H. Ward, Director of Health Services 
'Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 
Elsie Pancoast Wasson, Dietitian 
» Odin Tidemand, Maintenance Superintendent 



FACULTY AND STAFF, 1958-1959 

*iEARLE T. Hawkins, President 
A.B., Western Maryland College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., Western Maryland College 

Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 

A.B., Hastings College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University 

of Pennsylvania; LL.D., Doane College 

Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 



95 



Robert W. Abendroth, Education 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Ed., University of Vermont; graduate study, 

Temple University 

'Howard B. Anderson, Education 
B.A., "Western Washington College of Education; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study, Pennsylvania State University 

^ Allene B. Archer, Mathematics 
A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.Ed., University of Virginia; graduate 
study. Harvard University; Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Johns Hopkins University; Cornell University 

v/John R. Bareham, Physical Science 
B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 

"^George A. Beishlag, Geography 
A.B., "Wayne University; M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 

'^ L. Edward Bevins, English 
A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

" Corinne T. Bize, Health, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., Teachers 
College, Columbia University 

^ Marjorie F. Bleul, Physical Education 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Loyola College; graduate study, Johns 
Hopkins University 

" Pearle Blood, Geography 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; M.A., Columbia University; 
graduate study, University of Chicago 

Arnold Blumberg, History 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

John P. Bollinger, Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester; M.M., School 
of Music, University of Michigan; graduate study. University of Iowa, 
University of Maryland 

Ella Bramblett, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., George Peabody College for 

Teachers; graduate study, Colorado State College of Education 

Arthur "W. Brewington, Speech 

A.B., Asbury College; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., George Peabody 

College for Teachers 



96 



Thelma S. Brewengton, Speech 

B.A., Cotner College; M.A., University of Denver; graduate study, 
Colorado State College of Education, New York University, University 
of Missouri 

•^AUD J. Broyles, Education 
A.B., Concord State Teachers College; M.A., Northwestern University; 
graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

i<iRAYSON S. BuRRiER, Education 

A.B., Catawba College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
graduate study, University of Maryland 

■' Frances M. Clarke, Psychology, Education 
A.B., Barnard College; A.M., Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

George C. Coleman, Social Sciences 

A.B., The College of the Ozarks; M.A., University of Olkahoma; Ph.D., 

State University of Iowa 

David L. Cornthwaite, Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study, University of Maryland 

"Louis T. Cox, Physical Science 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; graduate study, University of Maryland, Teachers College, 
Columbia University 

Eunice K. Crabtree, English 

A.B., M.A., George Washington University; Ed.D., Johns Hopkins 

University 

CoMPTON N. Crook, Biological Science 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study, George 

Peabody College for Teachers, Johns Hopkins University 

Jane Daniels, Physical Education 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Norman R. Diffenderfer, Geography 

B.S., State Teachers College, Shippensburg; M.A., University of Nebra- 
ska; graduate study. University of Nebraska 

John Duro, Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Syracuse University; graduate study. New York Univer- 
sity 

Warren D. Evans, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University 

*On leave, 1958-59 



97 



Joseph A. Falco, Social Science 

B.A., Duquesne University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

"^^ David Firman, Geography, Social Science 

B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of 

Maryland 

Regina I. Fitzgerald, Education 

A.B., Western Maryland College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Maryland 

Richard G. Frost, English 
B.A., M.A., San Jose State College 

Ethel G. Gardner, Assistant Dietitian 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene 

and Public Health 

Katharine Gilcoyne, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

W. Frank Guess, English 

A.B,, Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North Carolina 

'■■*David F. Guellaume, Art 

B.F.A., Alfred University; M.A., Syracuse University; graduate study, 

Ohio State University 

William H. Hartley, Education — Director of Junior High School 
Program 

B.S., Springfield College; M.S., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Charles A. Haslup, Music 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., University of Maryland; 

graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Wilfred B. Hathaway, Science 

B.S., Massachusetts State College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; 

Ph.D., Cornell University 

Ruth H. Hazard, Assistant Librarian 

Library Certificate, Geneseo State Teachers College; B.S., New York 
University 

Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.A., Cornell University; Ed.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 

*On leave, 1958-59 

** Appointed for second semester 1958-59 



98 



v*Mahlon Howard Hellerich, History 
Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania 

Richard L. Holler, Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Frostburg; M.Ed., "Western Maryland 

College 

Susan Huck, Geography 

B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., University of Michigan; graduate study, 

McGill University 

''C. Gladys Hughes, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
A,B., Women's College, University of North Carolina; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study, New York University, 
Johns Hopkins University 

Nina Hughes, English 

A.B., Florida State College for Women; M.A., CathoUc University o^ 
America; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University, Northwestern Uni- 
versity 

'•'Adele E. Hurshman, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Millersville State Teachers College; M.Ed., Temple University 

V Harry M. Hutson, History 
B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Edward R. Johnston, History, Admissions 

B.S.S., Spring Hill College; M.A., University of Detroit; graduate stud}, 

Rutgers University 

Mary Catherine Kahl, History 

A.B., M.A., University of Maryland; graduate study. University of 
Wisconsin 

Earl W. Killian, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. New York University 

William C. Kramer, Drama, Speech 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study. 
New York University 

June Lee, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky State College; M.A., George Peabody College 

for Teachers 

John Smith Lewis, English 

A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Brown University; Ph.D., New York 
University 

'''On leave 1958-59 



99 



Marilyn Jean Lowry, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 

State University 

Elsie H. Ludlow, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Cornell University; M.A., New York University 

*^Hazel E. MacDonald, Music 
B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

^ Frank A. Mann, Psychology, Education 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

'Curtis V. Martin, Geography 
B.S., State Teachers College, Trenton; M.A., Clark University; graduate 
study, Clark University 

John Carter Matthews, History 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

John "W. McCleary, History 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

Johns Hopkins University 

Robert Melville, Physical Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Slippery Rock; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Lloyd D. Miller, Art 

B.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Harvard University; graduate study. 

New York University 

^Jean C. Milnor, Assistant Librarian 
A.B,, Goucher College; M.S., in Library Science, Syracuse University 

^Donald I. Minnegan, Physical Education, Director of Athletics 
B.Phys.Ed., Springfield College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., 
George Washington University 

John B. Mitchell, Art 

B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study. 

Teachers College, Columbia University 

Harold E. Moser, Dircetor of Testing Services, Psychology 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Duke University 

Karl J. Moser, Business Manager 

B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., George Washington 

University; graduate study, George Washington University, University of 

Maryland. 



100 



* Francis J. Mueller, Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola College; M.A., Ed.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Harold E. Mum a, Biological Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Maryland; graduate study, University of Maryland 

Samuel H. Nass, Art 

B.S., Ohio University; M.F.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Edward Neulander, Psychology, Education 

B.S., City College of New York; M.S., Cornell University; Ed.D., Cornell 

University 

Faynelle Newland, Director of Residence Halls 

B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Lois D. Odell, Biological Science 

A.B., New York State College for Teachers; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity 

Charles C. Onion, Social Sciences 

B.S., University of Minnesota; B.M., MacPhail School of Music; M.A., 

University of Colorado; graduate study. University of Minnesota 

William F. Pelham, Physical Science 

B.Ch.E., Clarkson College of Technology; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 

Patrick C. Phelan, Jr., College Physician 

A.B., Loyola College; M.D., University of Maryland 

Stanley M. Pollack, Art 

B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study, New York University 

Alfred J. Ravelli, Physical Science 

B.S., Teachers College, East Stroudsburg; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 

A.B., Susquehanna University; B.S., in Library Science, Drexel Institute 

of Technology; M.A., in Library Science, University of Michigan 

Carl Reitenbach, Health 

B.S., State University Teachers College, Cortland, New York; M.A., 
New York University 

Mary E. Roach, Physical Education 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

*On leave second semester 1958-59 



101 



^IEdward I. RuBENDALL, Physical Science 
A.B., Illinois College; M.S., University of Illinois; graduate study, Uni- 
versity of Illinois 

v'Marion Stiles Sargent, English 
A.B., Trinity University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Texas 

/Harvey L. Saxton, Education 
B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut; M.A,, Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut 

Marguerite S. Seaman, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; A.M., University of Chicago 

Ellen E. Smith, Assistant Librarian 

B.S., State Teachers College, Millersville; B.S., in Library Science, Trenton 

State College 

vRuTH L. Smith, Education — Director of Elementary School Program 
A.B., M.A., George Washington University; Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University; graduate study. University of Maryland 

- Charles N. Somers, English, News Bureau 
B.A., Wayne University; M.A., University of Michigan; graduate study. 
University of Michigan, University of Maryland 

Ellenor-Knowles Stafford, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
A.B., Sweet Briar College for Women; M.Ed., University of Virginia 

Herbert H. Stewart, Biological Science 

B.A., M.S., University of Connecticut; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 

University 

^ Kenneth T. Stringer, Biological Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland 

-^Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 
A.B., University of Tennessee; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers; Ph.D., Columbia University; study, University of Barcelona 

"Beatrice June Thearle, English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland 
> Charles Tinari, Assistant Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.Ed., New Paltz State Teachers College; M.S., Syracuse University; 

graduate study, New York University 

^ Zenith Hurst Velie, Education — Director of Kindergarten-Primary 
Program 

B.Mus., Palmer College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
M.Ed., University of Maryland; graduate study, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Northwestern University, Syracuse University 



102 



Marvin C. Volpel, Mathematics 

A.B., Western Michigan University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ed.D., 

Michigan State University 

Ernst O. von Schwerdtner, Modern Languages 

A.B., St. John's College; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University 

Mariana H. Ward, Director of Health Services 

R.N., Oglethorpe Sanitarium; B.S., "Western Reserve University 

Elsie P. Wasson, Dietitian 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Emma E. Weyforth, Music 

A.B., Goucher College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Walter W. Williamson, Education 

A.B., Lafayette College; Ed.M., Temple University; Ed.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

A. Isabel Wilner, Assistant Librarian, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.A., William Smith College; B.S., in Library Science, Carnegie Institute 

of Technology 

Amy Winslow, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Earlham College; B.L.S., New York State Library School; M.A., 

Graduate Library School, University of Chicago; LL.D., Goucher College 

Virginia J. Wolfram, Assistant Director of Residence Halls 
A.B., Blackburn College; M.S., Indiana University 

* Phineas p. Wright, English 
A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Virginia; graduate 
study, University of Virginia 

•^Arthur C. Yarbrough, Jr., Physical Science 
B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; graduate study, George Peabody College for Teachers 

"Merle Yoder, Assistant Librarian 
Diploma in Library Science, Western Reserve University; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

* Mildred Zindler, Art 

A.B., Florida State University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity 



''On leave second semester 1958-1959 



103 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY DIVISION 

1958-1959 

Mrs. Millicent Becker, Kindergarten, Leith "Walk Elementary School 

Mrs. Dorothy Busick, Kindergarten, Franklin D. Roosevelt Elementary 
School 

Miss Bernice Cronin, Kindergarten, Yorkwood Elementary School 

Miss Helen Nitowski, Grade one, Northwood Elementary School 

Miss Thelma Smerker, Grade one, Leith Walk Elementary School 

Mrs. Florence Udel, Kindergarten, Montebello Elementary School 

Miss Yvette Velie, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 

Mrs. Mary Veloso, Grade one, Fallstaflf Elementary School 

Miss Iris Zimmerman, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 

COOPERATING TEACHERS 

ELEMENTARY DIVISION 

1958- 1959 

Mrs. Mildred Arnal, Grade five. Perry Hall Elementary School 
Miss Jean Arnold, Grade jive, Campfield Elementary School 
Mr. Thurston A. Atkins, Grade jive, Armistead Elementary School 
Mrs. Margaret S. Barnard, Grade three, Oakleigh Elementary School 
Mrs. Janice Bennett, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Christine Bobo, Grade four. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Frances Brookes, Grade four, Dundalk Elementary School 
Mrs. Anna C. Cella, Grade four, Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 
Mrs. Lillian Chabinak, Grade five. Villa Cresta Elementary School 
Mrs. Virginia Churchill, Grade one, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mr. James E. Cox, Grade six, Thomas Johnson Elementary School 
Mrs. Mariesther Dando, Grade two. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Elaine Davis, Grade two, Fullerton Elementary School 
Mrs. Alma Denny, Grade one. Gray Manor Elementary School 
Mrs. Dorothy W. Diehl, Grade five, Fallstaff Elementary School 
Miss Nancy T. Dolan, Grade one. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Merrill Egger, Grade three, Westowne Elementary School 
Mrs. Alice Gibson, Grade one, Fullerton Elementary School 



104 



Mrs. Frances M. Gleichmann, Grade six, Armistead Elementary School 

Mrs. Helen Gordon, Grade three, Surrey Elementary School, Washing- 
ton County 

Mrs. Gladys Grimes, Grade four, Franklin Elementary School 

Mrs. Beatrice Hopper, Grade three & four. Liberty Elementary School 

Mr. Herman Jackson, Grade five, Parkville Elementary School 

Mrs. Clara C. Johnston, Grade six, Stoneleigh Elementary School 

Mrs. Virginia Johnston, Grade six, Parkville Elementary School 

Mrs. Frances Longford, Grade four. Freedom District Elementary 
School, Carroll County 

Mrs. Mary McCann, Grade four, Towson Elementary School 

Mrs. Dorothy McFadden, Grade five, Edgemere Elementary School 

Mrs. Doris Middleton, Grade three, Pangborn Boulevard Elementary 
School, Washington County 

Mrs. Dorothy Moler, Grade two. Villa Cresta Elementary School 

Miss Hallie G. Odgers, Grade four, Oakleigh Elementary School 

Mrs. Mary W. Pfeil, Grade one, Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

Mrs. Ruth K. Rattan, Grade three, Parkville Elementary School 

Mr. Don Rogerson, Grade six, "Westowne Elementary School 

Mrs. Margaret R. Rudigier, Grade six, Leith Walk Elementary School 

Mrs. Frieda G. Schaeffer, Grade three, Loch Raven Elementary School 

Mrs. Anne Schilling, Grade four, Loch Raven Elementary School 

Mrs. Martita Smith, Grade six, Parkville Elementary School 

Mrs. Shirley Smith, Grade two, Waverly Elementary School 

Miss Edith Stark, Grade two, Lyndhurst Elementary School 

Mbs. Rena D. Sugar, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 

Mrs. Helen Taylor, Grade six, Oakleigh Elementary School 

Miss Audna Thompson, Grade Six, Cockeysville Elementary School 

Miss Marian Touchstone, Grade five, Maywood Elementary School, 
Cecil County 

Mrs. Marcella D. Wilson, Grade five, Lutherville Elementary School 

Mrs. Polly W. Young, Grade three, Hampden Elementary School 

Mr. Harry Zemel, Grade six, Liberty Elementary School 



105 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 

JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION 

1958 - 1959 

Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, History, Pimlico Junior High School 

Mr. Donald Algier, Core 8 Sudbrook Junior High School 

Mrs. Helen Bartholow, English, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mrs. Lillee Blum, Geography, Roland Park Junior High School 

Mrs. Helen Boswell, English, "Woodbourne Junior High School 

Mrs. Dorthea Bush, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mrs. Anne Crane, Math, Robert Poole Junior High School 

Mr. Theodore Danish, Math-Science 8, Sudbrook Junior High School 

Mr. John Day, Core 8, Parkville Junior High School 

Mrs. Gertrude Denaburgh, Elistory, Pimlico Junior High School 

Mrs. Joyce DiDomenico, History, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mr. Sylvan Dogoloff, Geography, General Henry Lee Junior High 
School 

Mrs. Annette Dowtsts, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 

Miss Ruth Falkestein, History, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 

Mrs. Stella Federline, History, Benjamin Franklin Junior High School 

Mbs. Celia Fink, Social Studies, Garrison Junior High School 

Mrs. Margie Handy, Core 7, North Point Junior High School 

Mr. Wilmer Jones, Math, Robert E. Lee Junior High School 

Mr. La-wtience Juchs, Math-Science 7, Parkville Junior High School 

Miss Dorothy Keesecker, Core 7, Golden Ring Junior High School 

Mrs. Maudre Keyser, History, Robert Poole Junior High School 

Mr. La^trence Little, Math-Science 8, Towson Junior High School 

Mr. Franklin Lynch, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mr- Anthony Marchione, Math-Science 8, Golden Ring Junior School 

Miss Marjorie McBurney, Math, Francis Scott Key Junior High School 

Mrs. Margaret Mueller, Math, Roland Park Junior High School 

Mr. Lewis Mulligan, Geography, Pimlico Junior High Shool 

Mr. John Napp, Geography, Pimlico Junior High School 

Miss Beulah Parker, Math, Benjamin Franklin Junior High School 

Mrs. Margaret Payne, Core 7, Parkville Junior High School 

Mr. Ronald L. Peterson, History, Hamilton Junior High School 



106 



Mrs. Dale Proffitt, Geography, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mr. James Sanders, History, Gwynns Falls Park Junior High School 

Mr. Calvert Schlick, History, Garrison Junior High School 

Mrs. Jane Sheridan, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Mrs. Edith Sloop, Core 8, Towson Junior High School 

Miss Margaret Spellissy, History, Edmondson Senior High School 

Miss Dorothy Smith, English, Edmondson Senior High School 

Mr. Stanley Smith, Math-Science 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mrs. Maxine Streatt, Core 7, Towson Junior High School 

Mrs. Elsie Streett, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Mrs. Mary Thomas, Core 7, Catonsville Junior High School 

Mrs. Annie Wagner, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mr. Leander Walton, Math-Science 7, North Point Junior High School 

Mr. Vaughn Weimer, Math-Science 7, Golden Ring Junior High School 

Mrs. Evelyn Wilson, History, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 

Mr. Norman Wise, History, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mr. Sidney Zeltzer, History, Pimlico Junior High School 

OTHER STAFF MEMBERS AND ASSISTANTS 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Joan L. Albinsky, Senior Stenographer 

Ruth S. Davis, Receptionist and Switchboard Operator 

Marguerite S. German, Senior Stenographer 

Adda L. Gilbert, Administrative Assistant 

Frances Gill, Stenographer-Secretary 

Kathryn S. Gordon, Senior Stenographer 

John S. Gwynn, Reproduction Machines Operator 

Lindsay Ann Leedy, Senior Stenographer 

Lela B. Magness, Senior Stenographer 

Carola a. Twigg, Senior Typist 

Arline P. Wildason, Senior Stenographer 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE 

Patricia L. Faber, Senior Stenographer 

C. Elizabeth Owings, Stenographer-Secretary 



107 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Margaret G. Barall, Principal Account Clerk 
Frances A. Curran, Junior Account Clerk 
Jane E. Eagler, Senior Account Clerk 
Geraldine Jaworski, Senior Accotcnt Clerk 
Helen V. Redel, Stenographer, Accounting 
William M. Farley, Post Office Clerk 

REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 

Ann L. Kelleher, Senior Typist 
Dorothy E. Lohr, Senior Typist 
Ethel L. Richmond, Senior Stenographer 

ALBERT S. COOK LIBRARY 

June M. Baines, Senior Typist 
Bernice K. Cox, Library Assistant 
M. Louise Pace, Library Assistant 
Howard E. Walters, Junior Clerk 

LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 

Winifred N. Baker, Stenographer-Secretary 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Mary E. Basler, Supervisor of Residence, Newell Hall 

Florence Perrine, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 

Virginia K. Tilghman, Supervisor of Residence, Prettyman Hall 

Josephine Wagemann, Superviser of Residence, Ward Hall 

'-'■ Warren D. Evans, Faculty Counselor, West Hall 

* Charles R. Copper, Student Assistant Supervisor of Residence, 
East Hall 

Elizabeth E. Starr, Senior Stenographer 

HEALTH CENTER 

Helen Porter, Licensed Practical Nurse 



* Part-time 



108 



STUDENT CENTER 
Sue W. Richardson, Book Shop Manager 
Rose Lee Gilbert, Book Shop Assistant 
Margaret A. Drost, "Snack Bar" Manager 
'•'Amelia "Warner, "Snack Bar" Night Manager 
* Nancy Walbeck, Student Center Hostess 
''Mattie E. "Ward. Student Center Hostess 
•■•Esther Barrett. Student Center Hostess 

*Part-time 

GRADUATES 

Teachers College 

Bachelor of Science Degrees — June 8, 1958 

Christine Roberts Aler, Baltimore County 
Barbara Joan Amey, Baltimore County 
Marie Hetsch Amoss, Harford County 
Joan Elaine Anderson, Baltimore City 
Charles Anello, Baltimore City 
Joan Anne Archambault, Montgomery County 
Eugene Charles Athey, Baltimore County 
Barbara Lou Baller, Baltimore County 
Geraldine Elizabeth Barnes, Carroll County 
Charlotte Naomi Bauernfeind, Baltimore City 
Joan Lea Bauernschmidt, Baltimore County 
Julian Jacob Bauman, Jr., Baltimore County 
Helen Romaine Beair, "Washington County 
"William Monroe Beckwith, Baltimore County 
Shirley Mae Beine, Anne Arundel County 
Ernest Eugene Bennett, Baltimore City 
Ada Elizabeth Bigler, Anne Arundel County 
Margaret Elizabeth Birkmeyer, Baltimore City 
Anne Louise Birx, Baltimore County 
Gladys June Blain, Baltimore City 
Nelson Kenneth Bolender, Baltimore County 
Lawrence Carey Bolster, Baltimore County 
Gwendolyn Houdeshel Boone, Baltimore County 
Mildred Bosies, Baltimore City 
Geraldine Ann Bossen, Baltimore City 



109 



Kenneth Clinton Boublitz, Baltimore City 

Dolores Forrester Bo wen, Baltimore County 

Donna Yvonne Boyd, Washington County 

Charles Clinton Brawn, Baltimore City 

Marie Adele Brewster, Baltimore County 

Margaret Dickensheets Brilhart, Carroll County 

Robert Henry Broderick, Baltimore County 

Leona Yvonne Brubaker, Frederick County 

Joan Eury Burrier, Frederick County 

Barbara Ann Burdick, Baltimore City 

Gladys Rowe Burns, Baltimore County 

June Butehorn, Baltimore City 

Emmy Lee Butler, Baltimore City 

Gertrude Troph Byrd, Baltimore County 

Phyllis Ann Cahall, Queen Anne's County 

Philip Campagna, Baltimore City 

Catherine Marie Campbell, Anne Arundel County 

Lenora Louise Carr, Baltimore County 

La URINE Vincent Catalano, Baltimore County 

Marlene Elnora Chrysam, Baltimore City 

Richard Lee Clem, Frederick County 

Elizabeth Ann Clopper, Washington County 

Robert Allen Cohen, Baltimore City 

Dorothy Edith Conery, Baltimore City 

Russell Fields Connelly, Jr., Baltimore County 

Ellen Lois Reamer Cooper, Baltimore City 

Carl LeRoy Craycraft, Baltimore City 

Paul Gabriel Crowley, Baltimore County 

Roberta Marie Cruichshanks, "Washington County 

Lillian Mary D'Ambrosio, Baltimore City 

Walter Everett Dashiell, Baltimore City 

Dudley Gariss Davis, Baltimore County 

Paul Frisby Davis, Jr., Baltimore County 

Thomas Ashby Davis, Baltimore City 

Frances MeDora DeLauder, Washington County 

Esther Ruth Levin Deming, Baltimore County 

Kathryn Ann DeVilbiss, Baltimore County 

Angela Catherine Diakoulas, Baltimore City 

Helen Mildred Doering, Baltimore City 

Griffith Byrd Dorn, Jr., Baltimore City 

Marlene Helmer Duke, Baltimore City 



110 



John Eigenbrodt, Baltimore City 
Marlyn Epstein, Baltimore City 
John Francis Fanning, Prince George's County 
Mildred Ann Dix Filbey, Baltimore City 
Suzanne Miller Finney, Baltimore County 
Raymond Louis Fischer, Baltimore County 
Ruth Natalie Fleming, Baltimore County 
Ernest Almar Forthman, Baltimore County 
Lee Rhoda Fox, Baltimore City 
Sarah Jane France, Baltimore County 
Nancy Lois Freeberger, Baltimore City 
Richard Henry Frese, Baltimore City 
Mary Ellen Friddle, Baltimore County 
Joyce Gertrude Frizzell, Baltimore County 
Lillian Cooper Fries, Baltimore County 
Kenneth Winfield Frushour, Frederick County 
Elva Jane Gallaher, Montgomery County 
Sara Rena Goldstein, Baltimore City 
George Clarence Gott, Calvert County 
Elliott Gordon Gray, Baltimore City 
Janet Matthias Greisman, Baltimore City 
Patricia Ann Griffin, Baltimore City 
Janice Florence Griffith, Prince George's County 
Joan Elaine Grimes, Baltimore County 
Donald William Gross, Montgomery County 
Jane Irene Gumpman, Baltimore City 
Linda Kern Hafer, Baltimore County 
Ruth Geraldine Hall, Baltimore County 
Ruth Grafton Hall, Baltimore County 
Shirley Ann Hall, Anne Arundel County 
George Richard Harple, Baltimoie City 
Myrtle Kenney Hartman, Baltimore City 
Gertrude Hanna Harwood, Baltimore City 
Barbara Joyce Hazen, Anne Arimdel County 
John Stauffer Heck, Baltimore County 
Nancy Virginia Heim, Montgomery County 
Sheila Mae Heintz, Harford County 
Herschel Theodore Hochman, Baltimore City 
Norma Inga Hoibroten, Baltimore County 
Carole Holmes, Prince George's County 
Marie Catherine Horacek, Baltimore City 
Elizabeth May Hoster, Cecil County 



111 



Elizabeth Cover Hughes, Prince George's County 
Elaine Krause Hundertmark, Baltimore City 
Marie Hunycutt, Baltimore County 
Rosemary Jenkins, Baltimore County 
Eva Louise Jones, Baltimore City 
Frances Angela Joska, Baltimore County 
Sara Bernstein Kanefsky, Baltimore City 
Agnes Martha Kardos, Montgomery County 
Joan Elizabeth Keller, Baltimore County 
Evelyn Durling Kennedy, Baltimore City 
Philip Eskridge Kennedy, Jr., Baltimore City 
Dorothy Louise Kenney, Baltimore City 
Mary Elizabeth Kerby, Prince George's County 
Donald Lea Knox, Baltimore City 
Joyce Kelman Kronthal, Baltimore City 
Barbara Anne Kurth, Baltimore County 
Mary Jo Kyle, Baltimore City 
Elizabeth Anthony Lallas, Baltimore City 
Harry Michael Lang, Baltimore City 
Grace Watts Lee, Baltimore City 
Judith Ann Lee, Prince George's County 
Maureen Frances Lee, Baltimore City 
Dorothy Ann Levin, Baltimore City 
Elaine May Levy, Baltimore City 
Henry John Lichtfuss, Carroll County 
Linda Lou Higgins Linfield, Baltimore City 
RoNA Wasserman Loiderman, Baltimore City 
James Henry Long, Anne Arundel County 
WiLMA Lee Long, Baltimore County 
Patricia Joan Louderback, Baltimore City 
Florence Aline Webb Lucas, Baltimore County 
Angela Frances Maranto, Baltimore County 
Lois Elizabeth Martin, Baltimore County 
Norman Herbert Max, Baltimore County 
Thomas Glenn McAuliffe, Anne Arundel County 
Mary Ensor McCann, Baltimore County 
Elaine Daffer McCormick, Baltimore City 
William Loftus McIntrye, Baltimore County 
Bessie Joan McKenney, Baltimore City 
Jacqueline Joan Meacham, Baltimore County 
Mary Dobson Metzger, Baltimore City 
Patricia Ellen Miles, Cecil County 



112 



Florence Kovitz Miller, Baltimore City 

Paula Ann Miller, Baltimore County 

Sandra Marcia Miller, Baltimore City 

Thomas Preston Miller, Jr., Baltimore City 

Elaine Pawelek Mohre, Baltimore City 

Barbara Harmony Moore, New Bremen, Ohio 

Harry Irving Moore, Baltimore County 

Edna Joy Morey, Harford County 

Robert Earl Moskowitz, Baltimore City 

Peggy Ann Mulligan, Prince George's County 

Barbara "West Myers, Carroll County 

DoROTY Anita Nash, Baltimore County 

Carol Florence Nichols, Baltimore City 

Anna Louise Nistico, Baltimore County 

Iris Louise Nyberg, Baltimore County 

Barbara Regina Nyce, Baltimore City 

Mary Welhelm Odell, Baltimore Coimty 

Annie Prunetta Kopp Owens, Baltimore County 

William Brooke Owings, Baltimore County 

Anne Josephine Padgett, Baltimore County 

Donald Leo Patrick, Baltimore City 

John Joseph Perilla, Baltimore City 

Mary Elizabeth Perkins, Baltimore City 

Robert Francis Joseph Petza, Baltimore City 

Mary Patricia Pieper, Baltimore City 

Ruth Shapiro Plump, Baltimore City 

Louise Grey Priddy, Calvert County 

Morton Sheldon Pruce, Baltimore City 

Elizabeth Campbell Pulsifer, Anne Arundel County 

Faye Sylvia Redding, Baltimore City 

Mary Ann Redding, Carroll County 

William Lloyd Reider, Baltimore County 

Joyce Estel Reinhardt, Anne Arundel County 

Helen Ruth Robbins, Baltimore City 

Judith Elayne Donahue Roberts, Baltimore County 

Arlene Peterson Rodney, Baltimore County 

Carol Ann Rogers, Baltimore County 

Stephen Mitchell Rohr, Baltimore City 

Sheila Shuster Rosenfeld, Baltimore City 

Milton Oliver Ruark, Jr., Baltimore City 

Margaret Ruhamma Rummell, Washington County 

George Louis Ruppersberger, Baltimore County 



115 



Joanne Eugenia Russell, Prince George's County 
Marilyn Thelma Sack, Baltimore City 
Ruth Elizabeth Sassman, Anne Arundel County 
Margaret Frances Schafer, Baltimore County 
Mary Elizabeth Schissler, Baltimore County 
Catherine Schnebly, "Washington County 
Ingrid Buchal Schoeler, Baltimore County 
Elinor Mae Schwartzman, Baltimore City 
Helen Louise Seebach, Baltimore City 
Maxine Hart Seidman, Baltimore City 
George Kenneth Seifert, Baltimore City 
Rita Chamish Shemer, Baltimore City 
Morris Sherman, Baltimore City 
Adele Enten Sidle, Baltimore City 
Miriam Yankow Silberstein, Baltimore City 
Harriett Lee Sinclair, Baltimore City 
Edmond Regis Sistek, Baltimore County 
Dolores Darlene Sittig, Frederick County 
James Francis Skarbek, Baltimore County 
Grace Gambriel Smith, Dorchester County 
Florence Levin Sober, Baltimore City 
Bettye Fishbein Soffer, Baltimore City 
Mary Kathryn Sorrentino, Baltimore County 
Thelma Eileen Southcomb, Baltimore County 
Ruth Ann Spencer, Harford County 
Peggy Anne Steinacker, Baltimore County 
Betty Jane Stone, Baltimore County 
Helen Williams Stough, Baltimore County 
Janice Endslow Stubbs, Baltimore County 
Marlene Joyce Nasdor Suls, Baltimore City 
William Stanton Talbott, Jr., Baltimore County 
Anne Christine Taylor, Cecil County 
Helen Konieczny Taymans, Baltimore City 
Joseph Taymans, Baltimore City 
Helen Shirley Thim, Baltimore City 
Joan Carroll Tischinger, Baltimore County 
Sidney Herbert Tishler, Baltimore City 
James Richard Traylor, Baltimore City 
John Gabriel Tridone, Baltimore City 
Caprice Monica Uhlhorn, Baltimore County 
Jean Louise Vaughn, Washington County 
Mary Ellen Wagner, Anne Arundel County 



114 



Jean Ann Walker, Baltimore County 

Katherine Elligood Warren, Charles County 

Ronald Charles Wartman, Baltimore County 

Judith Ann Weitzman, Baltimore City 

Barbara LeDonna Whaley, Howard Coimty 

Charlotte Smyrk Willasch, Baltimore City 

Doris Ruth Wimert, Carroll County 

Eileen Alice Wolf, Baltimore City 

Shirlee Rosalie Wolf, Baltimore City 

Janet May Worthington, Prince George's County 

Joyce Marie Wright, Cecil County 

Carol Ann Zartman, Baltimore City 

Barbara Weaver Zentz, Baltimore City 

Glenn Dorsey Zimmerman, Jr., Frederick County 



Post-Baccalaureate Candidate 
Harry Lawrence Feeley, Baltimore City 



Associate in Arts 

Eeleene Justice Baxley, Baltimore City 
Ronald Joseph Blake, Baltimore City 
Andrew Herbert Calvert, Baltimore County 
Charles Cline Coleman, Baltimore City 
Norman Jack Dean, Baltimore County 
Kenneth Washburn Duquet, Baltimore County 
Florence Knight Eastham, Baltimore County 
John Sterling Edwards, Jr., Baltimore City 
Mary Kay Fisher, Baltimore County 
Kathleen Marie Kerns, Baltimore City 
Margaret Thelma Knobel, Baltimore County 
Charlotte Anne Kunkel, Baltimore County 
Charles Leroy Mott, Baltimore City 
John Patrick Quinn, Baltimore City 
Linda Claire Royahn, Baltimore County 
Donald Lewis Sudbrink, Baltimore County 
Donald Palmer Vetter, Baltimore City 
Ronnie Barbara Wachs, Baltimore City 
Mary Jane Wurzbacher, Baltimore County 



115 



i^enior y-^lass s^fficers of 1958 

President Lawrence Carey Bolster 

Yice President Nelson Kenneth Bolender 

Recording Secretary Jacqueline Joan Meacham 

Corresponding Secretary Carolyn Willla.ms Smith 

Treasurer Nancy Virginia Heim 

i^rtemoeys of tne K^raauaiina K^^lass 

<Z^/cc^cc/ to <J\appa JLjelia J^i 

Barbara Lou Baller Agnes Martha Kardos 

Joan Lea Bauernschmidt Linda Lou Higgins Linfield 

William Monroe Beckwith Mary Dobson Metzger 

Philep Campagna Patrica Ellen Miles 

Lenora Louise Carr Edna Joy Morey 

Elizabeth Ann Clopper Barbara West Myers 

Robert Allen Cohen Anne Josephine Padgett 

Dorothy Edith Conery Mary Elizabeth Perkins 

Kathryn Ann DeVelbiss Elizabeth Campbell Pulsifer 

Sarah Jane France Joyce Estel Reinhardt 

Joyce Gertrude Frizzell Carol Ann Rogers 
Kenneth "Winfield Frushour George Kenneth Seefert 

Ruth Geraldine Hall Edmond Regis Sistek 

Nancy Virginia FIeim James Francis Skarbek 

Norma Inga Hoibroten Betty Jane Stone 

Carole Holmes Helen Shirley Thim 

Elizabeth Gover Hughes Caprice Monica Uhlhorn 

Eva LomsA Jones Joyce Marie Wright 

Summary of Graduates 

Junior College A A Certificates June 1958 19 

Teachers College B S Degrees June 1958 249 

Total number of Teachers College graduates since 1866 9,175 

Enrollment Summary 1957-58 

Men Women Total 

Junior College 44 53 97 

Teachers College 286 920 1206 

Evening Classes 4 42 46 

Grand Total 334 1015 1349 



116 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

1958-1959 

President 

Samuel Sharrov 724 Cloudyfold Drive, Baltimore 8 

First Vice-President 

William Jenkins 23 Chatsworth Ave., Reisterstown, Md. 

Second Vice-President 

QuiNTON Thompson McDonogh School, McDonogh, Md. 

Third Vice-President 

Jacqueline Pfarr 8009 Gough Street, Baltimore 24 

Treasurer 

James R. Bowerman 8727 Roper Road, Baltimore 14 

Secretary 
Dolores Deardorff 518 White Oak Drive, Severna Park, Md. 



Board of Directors 

Earle T. Hawkins State Teachers College at Towson 4 

Harold Katz 708 Leafydale Terrace, Baltimore 8 

Hilda Kestner 1214 John Street, Baltimore 17 

Donald Leuschner 404 LaClair Ave., Linthicum Heights, Md. 

Doris Wemert Jones 711 Cloudyfold Drive, Baltimore 8 

Lillian Rodenhi 2821 Hamilton Avenue, Baltimore 14 

James J. Sarnecki 2414 Fleet Street, Baltimore 24 

Senior Class Representative 



117 



INDEX 



Academic program, 31-34 

Academic regulations, 28-31 

Accidental injury reimburse- 
ment, 1 5 

Accreditation, 7 

Administrative Officers, 95 

Admission 

to advanced standing, 14 
to block of professional 

courses, 30 
to graduate program, 90-91 
to the Junior College, 14 
of liberal arts graduates, 14-15 
of special students, 14-15 
to student teaching, 30 
to the Teachers College, 12-15 
of transfer students, 14 

Advisory program, 21 

Alunmi, Association, 117 

Application fee and advance 
payments, 16 

Area of concentration, 32, 46 

Art department, 48-50 

Associate in Arts 

conferred June 1958, 115 
requirements for, 33-34 

Athletic Associations, 27 

Attendance, 30-31 

Auditing courses, 28 

Automobile regulations, 23 

Awards and honors, 24, 116 

Bachelor of Science 

conferred June 1958, 109 

requirements for, 33 
Block of professional courses 

requirements for admission, 30 
Buildings, 8-10 

Calendar, 5-6 
Campus, 8-10 
Certification, 34 
Change of course 

or schedule, 28-29 
Classification of students, 29 
Clubs and organizations, 24-28 



Cooperating teachers, 104-107 
Counseling, preadmission, 21 
Courses of instruction 

non-departmental, 47 

numbering of, 46 

offerings by departments, 48-89 

required courses, 35-37 

time of offering, 46 
Curriculum patterns 

Elementary, 36, 40-41 

Kindergarten-Primary, 3 5, 38 - 39 

Junior High School, 37, 42-43 

Junior College, 44-45 

Degree, requirements 

Elementary Division, 40-41 
Junior High School 

Division 42 - 43 

Kindergarten-Primary 

Division 38-39 

Dining faciUties, 10, 16 

Degrees conferred, June 1958, 109 

Dramatic organization, 26 

Education department, 50-58 
Elective courses, 32, 46 
Employment, Student, 20 
English department, 58-65 
Enrollment 1957-1958, 116 
Expenses, 15-19 

Facilities, 10-11 

Faculty and staff, 95-109 

Fees, 15 

Financial aid for students, 19-20 

Future development of college, 11 

Glen, The, 11 
Grading system, 29 
Graduate program, 90-94 
Graduates, June 1958, 109 

Health Center, 11 
Health Education 

department, 65-66 
Health services, 22-23 
History of college, 7 



INDEX (Continued) 



Honor societies, 27-28 
Housing and boarding, 16-17 

Junior College 
admissions, 14 
degree requirements, 33-34 
expenses, 1 5 
objectives, 8 
program, 32-33 
transfer, 14 

Liability for unpaid tuition, 19 

Library, 9 

Lida Lee Tall School 

building, 9 

calendar, 6 

faculty and staff, 95-109 
Loan funds, 20 

Mailing facilities, 11 
Master of Education, 90-91 
Marking and point system, 29 
Mathematics department, 66-68 
Modern Language 

department, 68-69 
Music department, 70-72 
Music organizations, 25-26 

Non-departmental courses, 47 

Objectives, 7-8 
Off campus students, 16 
Organizations and clubs, 24-28 
Orientation courses, 47 
Out-of -State students, 15, 18 

Part-time and summer 

students, 14, 15, 18 
Payment of fees, 18 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, 70 
Physical Education 

department, 72-73 
Placement, 22 
Pledge to teach, 13-14 
Post Office, 11 



Probation, 29 

Programs and special events, 28 

Psychology department, 74 - 77 

Publications, student, 27 

Refunds, 18 

Registration, 28 

Religious organizations, 25 

Residence halls 

activities, 23 

names, 9-10 

poUcies, 16-17 
Resident students 

costs and deposits, 16 

housing and boarding, 16-17 

room furnishing, 17 

Scholarships and loans, 19-20 

Science department, 77 - 8 1 

Service organizations, 25 

Social Science department, 81-89 

Special interest clubs, 26-28 

Speech requirement, 30 

Standards of academic work, 29-30 

State Board of Education, 95 

Student Center, 11 

Student employment, 20 

Student government 

organizations, 24-28 
Student life program, 2 1 - 24 
Student load, 28 

Student teaching centers, 1 04 - 107 
Summer and part-time 

students, 14, 15, 18 

Transcripts, 31 
Transfer students, 14 
Tuition, 15 

Unpaid tuition, 19 

Veteran students, 22 
Visiting day for freshman 

parents, 21 
Vocational guidance, 21 

Withdrawals, 18, 31 



STATUS OF TEACfflNG IN MARYLAND 

There exists at present, and will likely exist for the next ten years, 
a serious shortage of qualified teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 
Within the next decade the public schools of the State will have enrolled 
upwards of a hundred thousand more children than they had in 1949. The 
planned reduction in class size throughout the entire state will improve 
teaching conditions but will also call for more teachers. Never has there 
been a time when graduates of the teachers colleges were more in demand. 

Maryland has been in the forefront in estabUshing a single salary 
schedule — ^resulting in teachers with a college degree receiving the same 
salary regardless of whether they teach in the kindergarten, elementary 
school, junior high school, or senior high school of the pubUc school system. 

The increase in number of school positions means also a corresponding 
increase in the number of administrative and supervisory positions. Such 
positions are generally filled by promoting experienced and able teachers 
who have shown the necessary quaUties of leadership and personality and 
have prepared themselves for promotion through further study- 



CATALOGUE 1960-1961 



i:^:'''.'<'^w?>^'^ 



CORRESPONDENCE 



The mailing address 



State Teachers College ai iowson 
Baltimore-4, Maryland 



The telephone number 



VAlley 3-7500 

Switchboard open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily 
except Saturday and Sunday 



Specific correspondence should be addressed as follows: 



ADMISSION MATTERS 
BUSINESS MATTERS 
GENERAL MATTERS 
HOUSING OF STUDENTS 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORD 



Director of Admissions 
Business Manager 



Director of Residence 

. Dean of Students 

Registrar 





i#'%lll^ 



STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 



AT TOWSON 

Baltimore A, Maryland 




CATALOGUE 1960 - 1961 
Ninety-fifth Year Begins September, 1960 



CONTENTS 

Calendar for 1960-61 5 

The College 7 

Accreditation and State Support 7 

History 7 

Objectives 7 

Campus, Buildings, and Facilities 8 

Future Development 11 

Admissions 12 

Admission Requirements 12 

Expenses 16 

Scholarships, Loans, Student Employment 20 

Student Life Program 22 

Counseling and Advisory Service 22 

Health Service 24 

Residence Hall Activities 25 

Student Organizations 25 

Publications 28 

Awards, Honors 33 

Academic Regulations 29 

Academic Program 33 

Courses of Instruction 47 

Graduate Program 93 

State Board of Education 99 

Administrative Officers 99 

Faculty and Staff 99 

Graduates 19S9 115 

Alumni Association 123 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
AT TOWSON, MARYLAND 



I960 
June 25, Saturday 



June 27, Monday 
August 5, Friday 



September 11, Sunday 

September 11-15 
September 14, Wednesday 

September 15, Thursday 

September 16, Friday 
November 11, Friday 
November 23, Wednesday 

November 27, Sunday 
November 28, Monday 
December 16, Friday 

1961 
January 2, Monday 
January 3, Tuesday 
January 25, "Wednesday 
January 31, Tuesday 



Calendar for 1960-61 



Summer Session 

Registration for classes, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 

Stephens Hall 
Registration for residence, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 

Newell Hall 

Classes begin 

End of summer session 
Residence halls close 5 p.m. 

Firsi Semester 

Residence halls open for new students 1 p.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Orientation and registration for new students 

New day students leave residence halls by 9 a.m. 
Residence halls open for returning students, 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Registration for returning students, 8:30 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Midsemester 

Thanksgiving holiday begins 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Christmas holiday begins 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close 3 p.m. 



Residence halls open 3 p.m. 
Classes resume 

First semester examinations begin 
End of first semester 



February 1, Wednesday 

February 5, Sunday 

February 6, Monday 

February 7, Tuesday 
March 30, Thursday 

April 9, Sunday 
April 10, Monday 
April 12, Wednesday 
May 31, Wednesday 
June 7, Wednesday 
June 11, Sunday 



Second Semester 

Residence halls open for new students, 9 a.m. to 

11 a.m. 
New students report for orientation and 

pre-registration 9 a.m. 

Residence halls open for returning students, 
1 p.m. 

Registration for returning students, 8:30 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Easter holiday begins 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Midsemester 

Second semester examinations begin 

Second semester ends 

Baccalaureate Service 10.30 a.m. 
Commencement 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close 6 p.m. 



LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 

1960 
September 6, Tuesday School Opens 

November 23, Wednesday Thanksgiving holiday begins 2 p.m. 
November 28, Monday Classes resume 

December 16, Friday Christmas holiday begins 2 p.m. 

1961 
January 3, Tuesday 
March 30, Thursday 
April 10, Monday 
June 9, Friday 



Classes resume 

Easter holiday begins 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

School closes 



THE COLLEGE 



ACCREDITATION AND STATE SUPPORT 

The State Teachers College at Towson is Maryland's oldest and largest 
teacher education institution. It is a four-year college, accredited by the 
Maryland State Board of Education, the Middle States Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools and the National Council for the Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education. It is a member of the American Council on 
Education and has been approved by the American Association of Un- 
iversity Women. 

The College is an integral part of the system of public education in the 
State of Maryland. It is governed by the State Board of Education and is 
supported almost entirely by legislative appropriations. No tuition is 
charged Maryland residents for the teacher-education program. In lieu of 
tuition payments, students from Maryland pledge themselves to teach two 
years in the public schools of the State upon graduation. Students pay 
only such fees as are used in their own activities. 

HISTORY 

The Maryland Legislature of 1865 passed a law establishing the Mary- 
land State Normal School which was opened on January 15, 1866. For 
many years it was the only institution devoted exclusively to the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 

The school had three locations in the city of Baltimore, the best re- 
membered being at Lafayette Square, where the institution was housed 
from 1876 until its removal in 1915 to the present suburban location in 
Towson. 

From its founding in 1866 the school offered a two-year course for 
the preparation of elementary school teachers for Maryland. In 1931 the 
course of study was increased to three years and in 1934 to four years. The 
legislature of 193 5 authorized the institution to grant the "Bachelor of 
Science" degree and to change its name to the State Teachers College at 
Towson. 

Until 1946 the college confined itself to the single purpose of educat- 
ing teachers for the elementary schools. In that year a junior college was 
established to offer two years of college work on a transfer basis. In 1947 
the college enlarged its program to include the preparation of teachers for 
the junior high school, and in 1949 the preparation of teachers for the 
kindergarten-primary grades. In 195 8 a graduate program leading to the 
degree Master of Education was inaugurated. 

OBJECTIVES 
Objectives of the Teachers College 

The central purpose of the college is to prepare the best possible 
teachers for the public schools of Maryland. To this end, the educational 



program comprises a careful blend of cultural and professional oflFerings. 
The aim is to provide learning experiences through which students may 
acquire a broad cultural background, professional knowledge and skills, 
and a philosophy of education. In fulfillment of this purpose, the faculty 
aims to help each student demonstrate progress in ability to: 

1. Practice the values of democracy, accepting the responsibilities 
as well as the privileges involved. 

2. Live by ethical principles and respect spiritual values. 

3. Acquire facts, develop understandings, skills, and appropriate 
attitudes in the varioixs academic areas. 

4. Understand and use the general and special methods of inquiry 
of all the major disciplines. 

5. Learn and apply the contributions of the past, of all races, and other 
cultures. 

6. Gain increasing understanding of self and of human development. 

7. Know the materials for learning and the procedures for planning 
experiences to meet the needs of learners. 

8. Apply in teaching the principles that govern the learning process. 

9. Evaluate and record individual strengths and needs of learners. 

10. Organize time and daily living to foster physical and mental health. 

11. Go on learning continuously. 

Objectives of the Junior College 

The objectives of the Teachers College, except for those which relate 
specifically to professional education, apply to the Junior College program. 
The program has a two-fold purpose: first to offer a two-year program of 
hberal arts, and second to offer individual programs that will enable stu- 
dents to continue their education in colleges of their choice. There are no 
terminal courses as such; the entire program is built on the assumption that 
the students expect to continue their college education after the two years 
in the Junior College. The program, therefore, offers courses that will per- 
mit students to transfer to various senior colleges without difficulty or 
without loss of time. 

CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS 

In 1915 the college moved to its present site in the southern part of 
Towson on York Road, one of the main thoroughfares connecting Balti- 
more with northern communities. The one hundred acre campus is one of 
the most beautiful in this part of the country. It offers opportunities for 
healthful outdoor recreation and for coordinating classroom instruction 
with field study. 

The college is near enough to Baltimore for students to share in 
the cultural advantages that the city offers. Various institutions such as 



The John Hopkins University, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, 
museums and Kbraries contribute to the intellectual and social interests of 
the area. The city affords opportunities to attend opera, concerts, and the 
theater. 

Although the institution can claim almost one hundred years of 
existence, it has occupied its present campus only shghtly more than 
forty years. All buildings are thus of modern fire-resisting construction and 
have been erected in line with a definite plan of campus development. 

Stephens Hall (the administration building) is an impressive structure 
of Jacobean architecture which dominates the campus group and sets the 
pattern of architecture characteristic of all the buildings on the front cam- 
pus. It is named for M. Bates Stephens, State Superintendent of Education 
from 1900 to 1920, and contains administrative offices, classrooms and lab- 
oratories, and the auditorium. 

The Albert S. Cook Library, completed in 1957, is named for Albert 
S. Cook, State Superintendent of Schools from 1920 to 1941. This striking 
building of modern architecture and functional design has a book capacity 
of 100,000 volumes and a seating capacity of 450. In addition to stack 
areas and general reading rooms, it contains a periodical room, a seminar 
room, a micro-film and micro-card room, a hstening room for phonograph 
records, a lecture room, a teaching materials center, and several typing 
alcoves. 

The Lida Lee Tall School is the laboratory school used for observation, 
demonstration, and the practice of teaching. It consists of a kindergarten 
and six elementary grades. The school was named for Lida Lee Tall, presi- 
dent of the college from 1920 to 1938, under whose administration the 
present building was erected. In addition to classrooms, the building in- 
cludes offices, a cafeteria, a library and an assembly room. The school has 
played an important part in the program for teacher education since the 
year 1866. The building will be converted to college classroom use when a 
new campus laboratory school is completed, possibly by the fall of 1960. 

Wiedefeld Gymnasium is named for M. Theresa Wiedefeld, president 
of the college from 1938 to 1947, during whose administration it was 
erected. The building includes a large playing floor, spectators' balcony, 
offices, special rooms for individual physical education work, and shower, 
locker and dressing room facilities. 

Newell Hall, named for McFadden Alexander Newell, the founder 
and first principal of the institution, is one of the three residence halls for 
women. In this hall are the offices of the resident director and the dietitian, 
a large foyer, a television room, a conference room, a guest room, service 
rooms for students, and study and committee rooms. Students' rooms on 
the first and second floors are arranged in suites of two rooms with bath. 
Each room accommodates two or three students. The third floor has the 
usual arrangement of rooms and group baths. 

Richmond Hall, named for a former principal of the school, Sarah E. 
Richmond, adjoins Newell Hall. This building is occupied by freshmen 



women and some members of the Freshmen Advisory Council. Most of 
the rooms accommodate two students. There are a few single rooms and a 
sleeping porch with adjoining dressing and study rooms. On the first floor 
is a large attractive lounge which is used for formal social aflFairs. 

Prettyman Hall, named for E. Barrett Prettyman, principal of the 
school from 1890 to 1905, is the newest women's residence hall. Most of its 
rooms accommodate two students, but there are a few single rooms and sev- 
eral larger rooms for three students. The building contains a large lounge, 
several smaller lounges and study rooms, a recreation room, students' serv- 
ice rooms, and quarters for the resident director and resident supervisors. 

George W. Ward Hall and Henry S. West Hall are two identical res- 
idence halls for men, named for former principals of the school. Each 
contains a lounge with connecting kitchen, recreation room, and office and 
apartment for the resident supervisor. Rooms for students are modern in 
design and equipped with built-in facilities. 

East Hall (a converted adjacent residence) has been used to house a 
small number of upper-class men students. 

The Service Building includes the heating plant, engineers' offices, and 
the laundry. The top floor of this building is used as an auxiliary gym- 
nasium. 

Glen Esk, the President's home, is located on the northern part of the 
campus. The large house is surrounded by some rare trees planted years be- 
fore the college acquired the Towson site. 

Other buildings on the campus house the Health Center, and serve as 
homes for the chief engineer and the superintendent of grounds. 

FACILITIES 

The Library, now located in the modern Albert S. Cook Library build- 
ing, includes over 5 5,000 catalogued books in addition to a collection of 
5,000 volumes in the library of the Lida Lee Tall School. The Cook library 
also houses periodicals, courses of study, textbooks, pictures, pamphlets, 
standardized tests, slides, film strips, maps, phonograph recoi'ds and other 
audio- visual aids. A reserve book section is located near the main charging 
desk. 

The Dining Room in Newell Hall has recently been remodeled to pro- 
vide seating capacity of 500 persons and to add a new kitchen unit. It is 
open to day students and faculty at lunch time. 

The Auditorium located in a wing of Stephens Hall has a seating 
capacity of one thousand in main floor and balcony. It is equipped with 
a Baldwin concert grand piano and a large Baldwin electronic organ. The 
stage has recently been supplied with a modern lighting system for the 
use of the dramatic groups. 

The Student Center on the lower floor of the dining hall wing is avail- 
able to all students. It has a snack bar, bookshop, recreation room, lounge. 



10 



I 



a small dining room, offices for student organizations, a chapel, study 
rooms, and an outdoor patio. In the Lounge, the Art Department regularly 
sponsors a series of art exhibits which are open to the public. 

The Health Center in the Cottage to the rear of the campus school in- 
cludes a physician's and nurses' offices, a diet kitchen, rooms for men 
and women students, and living quarters for the nurse. 

The Athletic Field in the north part of the campus is completely 
tile-drained and surrounded by a quarter-mile cinder track. It is used for 
track, soccer, and baseball. Tennis courts, archery ranges and faciHties 
for other outdoor activities are nearby. 

The Post Office located on the ground floor of Stephens Hall is a 
regular branch of the Baltimore Post Office. It is open daily from 8:30 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday for the sale of stamps and 
money orders and for mailing letters and packages. 

The Glen containing ten acres of land is developed as a conservation 
and recreation area. It is registered as a bird sanctuary and is a United 
States bird banding station. Science classes use the Glen as a laboratory. 
Several outdoor fireplaces and a large shelter with fireplace provide oppor- 
tunity for many outdoor social activities. 

An Aviation Center is a feature of the science department. It is 
equipped with a Link Trainer and is used by college students, pupils from 
the Lida Lee Tall School and from neighboring public schools. 

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT 

The sharp increase in enrollment in public elementary and secondary 
schools is certain to lead to an increased enrollment in the colleges within 
the next few years. The State Department of Education has estimated that 
this college should look forward to an enrollment of from 2,500 to 3,000 
students in order to more nearly meet the need for teachers in the public 
schools of the State. 

The college has been fortunate in securing the services of a nationally 
recognized firm of landscape and campus architects. They are advising 
the college regarding the placement of future buildings that are likely to 
be needed. 

A new campus elementary school, first of the needed new buildings, 
is expected to be completed in 1960. 

Requests presented to the State Planning Commission for future 
development include additional men's and women's residence halls, a new 
physical education buiding, an infirmary and health center, a fine and 
dramatic arts building, a science building, a service building, and additional 
playing fields. 



11 



ADMISSIONS 



ADMISSION TO THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Admission to the teachers college division is granted to all applicants 
whose academic and personal qualifications and interest in the teaching 
profession give promise of success in the college. Because of limited facili- 
ties, the college reserves the right to close admissions when no further space 
remains. It is, therefore, advisable for high school students to make their 
college choice at the close of the junior year or early in the senior year. 

Students seeking admission should file their application blanks with 
the high school counselor by January of the senior year, so the application 
can be forwarded to the college immediately upon the close of the first 
semester. It is requested that all appHcations reach the college not later 
than April 1, prior to the September when admission is desired. Admission 
for February is limited to students with advanced standing or students 
who have been out of high school at least two years. 

Applicants with excellent records are granted admission on the basis 
of seven semesters of high school work, with the understanding that the 
remaining high school work will be of the same quaUty. Other appUcants 
are granted tentative admission or notified that the decision concerning 
admission will be postponed until June. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Graduation from approved high school.* 

An approved high school is a standard public high school or an 
accredited non-public secondary school. 

2. Recommendation from local school oflScials. 

Each candidate for admission from a Maryland public high school 
must be recommended by both the high school principal and the superin- 
tendent of schools in whose area the high school is located. A graduate of 
a non-public Maryland school or an out-of-state school must have the rec- 
ommendation of the high school principal. 

3. Specific subject matter units. 

All apphcants must have completed a well-organized curriculum 
totaling 1 6 units, including the following subjects required for graduation 
from any Maryland public high school: 



^Applicants over 19 years of age who are not graduates of approved high 
schools may qualify for admission by making satisfactory grades in the 
Equivalence Examinations. The State Department of Education will issue 
equivalence diplomas based upon tests given by that Department or will 
accept the records from USAFI for veterans. 



12 



English 4 units 

Mathematics 1 unit 

Social Sciences, of which 1 unit must be 

United States History 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

Electives 8 units 

Total 16 units 

4. Achievement in scholarship. 

a. The scholarship standards for students entering from Balti- 
more City and from the counties, though based on different marking sys- 
tems, are approximately the same. They are as follows: 

The State Board of Education requires that applicants from the 
county high schools shall have made grades of A or B in at least sixty 
per cent of the college entrance courses and a grade of C or higher in all 
other college entrance courses taken during the last two years of high 
school. Students who do not meet this standard may be considered for 
admission on the recommendation of the high school principal and the 
approval of the superintendent of schools. 

Applicants from Baltimore City high schools must have an average 
of eighty per cent in the last two years of high school work. Students not 
attaining this average may be considered for admission on the recommenda- 
tion of the high school principal and on the approval of the superntendent 
of schools. 

b. The testing programs now operating in the high schools and the 
freshman testing program of the college are regarded as sources of impor- 
tant supplementary data. Results of these tests are utilized in analyzing a 
student's potentialities and may serve as additional bases for determining 
a student's readiness for college. 

c. Students entering from private schools are considered under the 
same scholarship standards as those coming from pubHc high schools. Some 
of the private schools use letter grades while others follow a numerical 
grading system. 

5. Certification by the college physician. 

Applicants must meet acceptable standards of health and physical 
fitness; therefore a thorough physical examination by the college physician 
is required of all students. Complete speech and hearing tests are required 
of those referred to the speech clinic by the college physician or the ad- 
missions office. 

6. Citizenship in the United States. 

According to a by-law passed by the State Board of Education 
only citizens of the United States shall be employed in the State public 



13 



school system or admitted to the state teachers colleges. The Board may 
make exceptions in special cases upon the recommendation of the college 
and the State Superintendent of Schools. 

THE PLEDGE TO TEACH IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND 

Every Maryland student applying for admission to the teacher- 
education program is required to sign the pledge to teach two years in 
Maryland immediately following graduation unless temporarily released 
by the State Board of Education. 

A student who for any reason cannot teach immediately upon 
graduation is expected to secure from the president of the college a defer- 
ment or a release. 

Deferments may be granted for periods of one or two years for 
reasons deemed valid by the president. A release from the pledge to teach 
is granted only in rare circumstances when it is obvious that fulfilhng the 
pledge would be a virtual impossibility. 

A student who, upon graduation, does not teach and does not obtain 
a release or deferment shall have entered on his permanent record a state- 
ment that he is not entitled to honorable dismissal because of his failure to 
fulfill his obligation to the State. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

1 . Secure an application blank from the guidance department of the 
high school or from the Admissions Office of the College. 

2. Complete pages 1 and 2 of the application and take to the high 
school counselor for completion. At the time the application is 
filed with the counselor, the applicant receives a blank for sub- 
mitting the application fee of ten dollars to the College. 

3 . Arrange to take the admissions test either through the high school 
counselor or through the Admissions Office at the College. 

4. The counseor will send the application form to the College after 
the grades for the first semester of the senior year are available. 

5. When the application is received in the Admissions Office, the 
student is sent official information about his eligibility. After 
official notification of eligibility, he sends an advance payment of 
fifteen dollars to the Admissions Office as well as a ten dollar room 
reservation fee if eligible to live on the campus. 

ADMISSION TO THE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The requirements for admission to the junior college division are 
the same as to the teacher-education program, except for the following: 
( 1 ) the application does not have to be approved by the County Superin- 
tendent; (2) the applicant to the junior college does not have to meet 
as rigid physical standards as the teachers college student. 



14 



TRANSFER FROM THE JUNIOR COLLEGE TO THE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Students in the junior college may transfer to the teachers college 
if they meet the physical standards required for admission to the retire- 
ment system of the State of Maryland, are approved by the county or city 
superintendent for admission to the Teachers College, and are accepted by 
the Committee on Admissions and Standards on the basis of recommenda- 
tions from the faculty. A student desiring a transfer to the Teachers Col- 
lege files a written request for transfer with the Admissions OflSce. This 
office processes the request and notifies the student. 

ADVANCED STANDING REQUIREMENTS — TRANSFERS 

In addition to meeting the regulations under Admission Requirements 
an applicant for advanced standing must present complete records from 
each college attended and an acceptable academic record from the college 
that he last attended. Personal recommendations from colleges previously 
attended are also required. 

Courses offered for transfer credit must be of C grade quality or 
better. 

A satisfactory record in this college is necessary to establish advanced 
standing. Advanced standing is provisional until the student shows ability 
to maintain a satisfactory record in this college. 

A student may not transfer from one Maryland state teachers col- 
lege to another except by written permission from the State Board of 
Education. A student with failures in his courses will not be considered 
for transfer. 

SUMMER SESSION AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Because of the urgent need for elementary school teachers in Mary- 
land, the college provides for part-time and summer study as follows: 

(1) a program for graduates of liberal arts colleges to be taken during 
three six- week summer terms or in two semesters on the campus, (2) 
part-time study including late afternoon or evening classes for public 
school teachers on emergency certificates who wish to work toward their 
degrees, (3) a six- week summer session for (a) undergraduates who are 
former students of the college and hold teaching contracts or former 
students of other colleges with teaching positions who wish to work toward 
a degree, and (b) present students of the college who have their advisers* 
approval may enroll in the summer program. Further information regard- 
ing the summer session may be obtained from the Dean of Instruction. 
A bulletin is published early in each calendar year. 



15 



EXPENSES 

TUITION 

For Maryland residents who register for the teachers college program 
no tuition is charged. In Heu of paying tuition they pledge at least two 
years of teaching service in the public schools of the State upon graduation. 

Those who enroll in the junior college pay $150 a year for tuition. 

For out-of-state students the tuition is $200 a semester for enrollment 
in either the teachers college or the junior college. 

A part-time student (normally one who registers for less than 12 
semester hours) in the regular session, and all summer students, will pay 
fifteen dollars per semester hour each term. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING COSTS 

Students who live on the campus pay $266 for room and board for 
the academic year. Students approved as boarding students for whom resi- 
dence facilities are not available pay $179 a year for meals only. As 
residence space becomes available these students will be required to room 
in one of the halls, at which time an adjustment will be made in the rate 
charged for board and room. 

For all students who Kve off campus and take their meals In the college 
dining room, the cost for meals is $179 per year — $89.50 per semester. 

Rates for living expenses are subject to change by the State Board of 
Education. 

OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

An activities fee of twenty-five dollars a year Is assigned to the 
Student Goverment Association fund for class dues, student pubHcations, 
athletics, dramatics, assembly programs, and other authorized projects. 

An athletic fee of fifteen dollars a year Is assigned to the athletic 
associations and used for the athletic and physical education program. 

A limited number of lockers are available for student use. The col- 
lege assumes no responsibility for personal property placed in the lockers. 
There is a fifty cent locker fee and a fee of fifty cents for gymnasium^ 
locker. 

Each student shares a mailbox with another student. There Is an 
annual fee of fifty cents for the mail box. 

A student is expected to buy the textbooks for his courses. These may 
be purchased In the college bookshop. Students are required to buy gymna- 
sium suits for the courses in physical education. 

A late registration fee of five dollars Is charged to any student who 
registers after the date of registration named In the calendar. 



16 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 
Maryland Residents 

Teachers College Students 

Semester Semester Total 

I II Year 

Activities Fee $ 25.00 $ 25.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 15.00 

Mail Box & Locker Fee 1.00 1.00 

Total — Day Students $ 41.00 $ 41.00 

Board and Room 133.00 133.00 266.00 

Total — Boarding Students 174.00* $ 133.00 $ 307.00 

Junior College Students 

Fees as above $ 41.00 $ 41.00 

Tuition 75.00 75.00 150.00 

Total — Day Students $ 116.00* $ 75.00 $ 191.00 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the State 
Teachers College at Towson for the exact amount of the charges. All fees 
are due and payable at the time of registration, and students should come 
prepared to pay the full amount of the changes. No student will be ad- 
mitted to classes until such payment has been made. A late fee of $5.00 is 
charged for failure to pay at the time of registration. 

No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript 
of record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of 
his account. 

ADVANCE PAYMENTS 

Each applicant must pay an application fee of $10.00 and no applica- 
tion will be processed without this fee. When accepted, each applicant must 
make an advance payment of $15.00 in order to reserve a place in the 
college. Both the application and advance payment fees are applied to the 
total student fees due at time of registration. These fees are NOT 
REFUNDABLE except in cases where the applicant is not eHgible and 
admission is denied. 

A deposit of ten dollars for room-reservation Is required of all appli- 
cants who are eligible to live on the campus because of Uving outside the 



''Fees already paid will be deducted from the above. 



17 



commuting boundaries. This deposit must be sent with the advance pay- 
ment referred to above and will be deducted from the final amount of room 
and board due at the time of registration. 

The above room deposit is refundable if the student cancels his appli- 
cation and notifies the Admissions Office, in writing, prior to June 30 
for those entering in September and prior to December 1 5 for those enter- 
ing in February, or if the college denies admission to an applicant. 

All advance payments are sent to the Admissions Office. 

RESIDENCE HALL POLICIES 

Due to increasing enrollment and limited f aciUties for campus Hving, 
applications for residence hall space can be accepted only from students en- 
rolled in the Teachers College program. Junior College students who are 
not able to commute will be given assistance in securing rooms in college- 
approved homes off campus and the privilege of taking their meals in the 
college dining hall. 

To quahf y for living on the campus, a student must be single, enrolled 
in the Teachers College, and carrying a minimum of twelve semester hours 
of credit. Or a married student whose husband or wife lives at a distance 
greater than 50 miles from the college may also be eligible for residence 
living. A housing committee handles all exceptions on an individual basis. 

Priority for residence is given to the Teachers College student who 
lives in excess of one and one-half hours from the campus by pubUc com- 
muting transportation or at a distance greater than 2 miles from campus 
where no public commuting transportation is available. Until more 
residence accommodations are available, students living within commut- 
ing distance or out-of-state can not expect to be accommodated for 
campus living. 

Students who have reserved a room and entered a residence hall may 
withdraw to become day students only in case of change of residence, or 
directed teaching in their home areas. An adjustment of fees is made in 
the Business Office for special cases. If vacancies occur in the halls during 
the year, students on the waiting list may be admitted according to their 
dates of application, commuting problems or other extenuating circum- 
stances. 

All residence hall students are expected to leave the halls no later 
than twenty-four hours following their last examinations at the end of 
each semester. (See college calendar for opening of residence halls.) 

ROOM FURNISHINGS FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS 

Each student will need at least four single sheets, one pair of blankets, 
pillow cases, spread, quilted pad for bed 72 x 30 inches, towels, and two 
laundry bags. The quilted bed pads may be purchased from the college book 
shop. Bed linen and towels must have woven tapes attached giving the 
student's full name. 



18 



ACCIDENTAL INJURY REIMBURSEMENT 

For the benefit o£ those students who wish to participate, the college 
enters into an agreement with an approved insurance company to cover 
the students against any accidental injury either at school or at home dur- 
ing the college year. Participation in the plan is voluntary and costs approx- 
imately $4.50 for women and $7.30 for men. Students desiring this cover- 
age should make application at the business office. 

LIABILITY FOR UNPAID TUITION 

A Maryland student enrolled in the teachers college program pays 
no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the State. 

If he leaves before graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose 
of continuing his education in a college program which does not lead to 
teacher certification, he will be billed at the junior college tuition rate 
for the education he obtained at the college. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he transfers to 
a Maryland institution which has a teacher education program approved 
by the State Department of Education and if he reaffirms his pledge to 
teach for two years in the Maryland public schools upon graduation. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

A student withdrawing from the college must complete an official 
withdrawal card and file it in the registrar's office before he is entitled to 
any refund. Refunds are made on the following bases: 

Day Students 

A day student who withdraws within two weeks after his initial 
registration is entitled to a refund of fees paid and to a refund of tuition 
for the semester minus ten dollars. After the two week period no fees are 
refunded and tuition is refunded only on a half -semester basis. 

Boarding Students 

A boarding student who withdraws from the college receives refunds 
for fees and tuition in accordance with the regulations for day students. 
The refund of payment for room and meals is subject to the following 
regulations: 

L A student who withdraws from the dormitory within two weeks 
after the initial registration will be charged for one week in 
excess of his residence in the college. 

2. A student who withdraws from the dormitory at the request of 
the college after the first two weeks of any semester shall be 
charged for one week in excess of his residence in the college. 

3. A student who withdraws from the dormitory on his own or 
his guardian's initiative after the two weeks following regis- 
tration and before mid-semester shall receive no refund of board 
for the first half of the semester. If the withdrawal occurs after 
the mid-semester, there will be no refund of board paid for the 
entire semester. 



\9 



FINANCIAL AID FOR STUDENTS 

All students attending the college receive subsidy from the State, and 
residents of the State of Maryland enrolled in the teachers college pay no 
tuition. Still, there are the costs of residence living, transportation, books 
and other incidental matters which some students are unable to meet. 
Limited assistance is available through the scholarship fund or one of the 
loan funds. 

The establishment of policy concerning scholarships and loans and 
the administration of funds is under the direction of the Committee on 
Financial Aid, subject to the approval of the Student Life Council and the 
President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships were established by the will 
of Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of J. Charles Linthicum, who was a 
member of the class of 1886. The fund is administered by the trustees of 
the estate and the college committee. Both freshmen and upperclassmen in 
the teachers college program are eligible for these one hundred dollar 
awards. Ten of the scholarships have been set aside for entering freshmen. 
High school seniors who are contemplating entering the teachers college 
and who need some assistance in meeting college expenses for the first year 
should write to the Director of Admissions for application blanks. These 
applications must be filed no later than April 15. For upperclassmen there 
are twenty-five or more Linthicum scholarships. The number varies slightly 
according to the income from the fund. 

Income from the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund is allocated in fifty 
dollar amounts to students in the Teachers College. A total of $250 is cur- 
rently being awarded annually as scholarships. This fund was begun by 
Miss Richmond, a former principal of the normal school, and augmented 
by her friends. 

An upperclass student may receive the Minnie V. Medwedeflf Endow- 
ment Scholarship. This award is made annually to an outstanding student 
selected by the trustees of the fund. The scholarship was established in 
memory of Minnie V. Medwedeflf by her father. Miss Medwedeflf was an 
instructor in the college from 1924 until her death in 1935. 

Students are eligible also for other scholarships, usually $100, donated 
by various community groups. Certain groups furnish the money and ask 
college oflScials to select the recipients. Other groups furnish the money and 
also select the person to be granted the award. The Towson Rotary Club, 
the Maryland organization of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
and the "Women's Club of Linthicum Heights are among the groups who 
supply the money and ask the college to select the award winners. 

Upper-class students may secure application blanks for all college 
allocated scholarships from the Business OflSce and file them with the chair- 
man of the Committee on Financial Aid. For consideration for the academic 
year, applications must be filed by April 1, prior to the September term. 



20 



Loan Funds 

Students in need of funds to meet college expenses may submit an 
application to the chairman of the Committee on Financial Aid at any- 
time the need becomes evident. College loans are made at a low rate of in- 
terest and can be renewed until after the student has received a teaching 
position. 

Five loan funds have been estabHshed for college students. They are 
the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund, the College Loan Fund, the Edward 
Moulton Fund, the National Defense Student Loan Program, and the Balti- 
more County Schoolmen's Loan Fund. 

The Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund was established by Sarah E. Rich- 
mond, who was connected with the college for fifty-five years, as student, 
teacher, principal and dean of women. This fund has been increased by 
gifts from the alumni association. The Sarah E. Richmond Fund is adminis- 
tered by a special alumni committee consisting of Mr. George Schluder- 
berg, Mrs. Grace Carroll, and Mrs. Mary N. Lynch. Requests for loans 
from this fund may be made to Mr. Schluderberg, 3613 Lochearn Drive, 
Baltimore 7, Maryland. 

The College Loan Fund has a value of $7,930, and was made by con- 
tributions from the following: the Class of 1900 Memorial to Katherine 
Muhlback, the Class of 1925, the Normal Literary Society, the Pestalozzi 
Society, the Reese Arnold Memorial, the Lillian Jackson Memorial, the 
Esther Sheel Memorial (Class of 1927) , the Carpenter Memorial, the Eunice 
K. Crabtree Fund (gift of the class of 1931), the Pauline Rutledge Fund 
(gift of the class of 1934), the Pearle Blood Fund (gift of the class of 
1940), the 1933 Gift Loan Fund of Faculty and Students, the Gertrude 
Carley Memorial, Washington County Alumni, the Grace Boryer Downin 
Fund, the Class of 1941 Fund, the Martha Richmond Fund, the Tower 
Light Fund, the M. Clarice Bersch Fund (gift of the Class of 1951), the 
Bettie Sipple Fund sponsored by the Maryland Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and the Lucy Scott Fvmd, the last reserved for student teachers. 

The Edward Moulton Fund, established in memory of a student of the 
Class of 1957, is a short term loan fund open to all students, interest free. 
Application for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of Stu- 
dents. 

The National Defense Student Loan Program was estabhshed by the 
National Defense Education Act of 1958. The Act provides that the repay- 
ment of the principal of the loan, together with accrued interest thereon, 
shall be made to the college over a ten year period beginning one year after 
the date when the borrower ceases to be a full time student and ending 
eleven years after such date. The loan bears simple interest upon the unpaid 
balance at the rate of 3 percent per year. Interest does not begin to accrue 
until one year from the date the borrower ceases to be a full time student. 
The loan, and interest thereon, of any borrower who serves as a full time 
teacher in a public elementary or secondary school within a state shall be 
cancelled up to a maximum of 50 percent at the rate of 10 percent of the 
amount of the loan plus interest thereon for each academic year of service. 



21 



Under provisions of the act, students must meet four qualifications to be 
eligible for assistance. They must be citizens or permanent residents of the 
United States. They must be in good academic standing and, in the opinion 
of the college, capable of maintaining a strong academic record. They must 
be ixill time undergraduate students. They must show financial need. 

The Baltimore County Schoolman's Club Loan Fund was established 
in September of 1959. Junior and senior men students of the teachers col- 
lege who are graduates of Baltimore County High Schools and who plan to 
teach in Baltimore County may borrow from this fund upon the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Financial Aid. The loan is to be repaid one 
year after graduation. 

Apphcation forms for loans for upper-class students may be obtained 
at the Business Ofl&ce. High School seniors may apply to the Director of 
Admissions for Federal loans. Applications must be submitted to the chair- 
man of the Committee on Financial Aid. 

Student Employment 

Opportunity for student employment on the campus is limited. The 
college discourages part-time employment during a student's first semester 
in attendance and during student teaching. Students desiring part-time 
employment should file an application in the oflSce of the Dean of Students 
at the time of registration. 

STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 

PRE-ADMISSION COUNSELING 

A close relationship exists between the guidance departments of the 
high school and the admissions office of the college. This relationship 
enables students to become acquainted with the college offerings early in 
their high school course and to work toward meeting the admission require- 
ments. Representatives of the college participate in college nights and career 
days sponsored by school systems throughout the state. A Visiting Day for 
high school seniors is held on the campus each fall and this is followed by 
an Open House for parents of high school juniors and seniors. All of these 
direct contacts with the college assist juniors and seniors in determining 
their college choices. 

After an application is filed, each student is asked to report to the 
college for a physical examination and an interview with a member of the 
admissions staff. The high school record and results of the entrance test 
aid the interviewer in counseling the student. If there is doubt concerning 
the eligibility of an applicant he is assisted in making other plans and con- 
tacts. If the applicant is planning for residence housing, the admissions 
interview is followed by an interview with a member of the residence staff. 

THE FRESHMAN ADVISORY PROGRAM 

Selected faculty members serve as personal and professional counselors 
to freshmen. Personal interviews, group meetings, and laboratory expe- 



22 



nences are provided to promote self-orientation and to help freshmen ex- 
plore interests and abilities of professional significance. This program of 
personal and professional orientation is organized and administered as a 
regular part of the college curriculum. (See Orientation 101-102 and 
109-110, page 48, and Freshman Advisory Council, page 26 for further 
details.) 

VISITING DAY FOR FRESHMAN PARENTS 

On the second Sunday of the fall semester, parents of all freshman 
students are invited to spend an afternoon at the college. This occasion 
provides an opportunity for parents to tour the campus and to meet 
other parents, students and the faculty. 

THE ADVISORY PROGRAM FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

At the end of the freshman year, each student selects a faculty 
member who will serve as his adviser for the remaining years the student 
is in college. The relationship between student and adviser provides 
the student with an understanding adult with whom he may discuss his 
personal problems, and consider his special needs. When such assistance 
seems desirable, students are encouraged to consult instructors, the deans, 
and other college officials. 

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 

Teachers College Students 

Students entering the teachers college have already decided upon 
their profession. Vocational guidance for these students, therefore, is 
concerned with providing experiences upon which the student may draw 
in choosing a teaching area. If a student is advised to discontinue his 
preparation for teaching, however, he is assisted by his advisers and mem- 
bers of the administration in investigating other vocational fields. 

Junior College Students 

Prior to entrance each junior college student is asked to furnish 
information concerning his interests and educational plans for the two 
years following junior college. The catalogue of the institution to which 
the student expects to tranfer is examined to determine the prerequisites 
that he should complete in the junior college. On the basis of this informa- 
tion, and usually after an interview with admissions personnel, the stu- 
dent's program is planned. 

The orientation course for the junior college student is planned to 
assist him in the choice of a profession. Vocational tests are given. Visits 
arc made and conferences held to afford the student opportunities to meet 
and talk with leaders in many professions. These experiences are drawn 
upon as the student discusses his aptitudes and interests in various pro- 
fessions with his adviser. 

VETERAN STUDENTS 

Close contact is maintained between the Veterans Administration and 
the college through the registrar's office and a faculty veterans' adviser. 



23 



Veterans who plan to use educational benefits under any of the G. I. Bills 
are assisted in the completion of papers necessary to insure registration and 
prompt subsistence payments. 

PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 

The supervisors of student teaching furnish the seniors with whom 
they work information concerning placement in city or county schools. 
The dean of instruction helps to coordinate the requests from superintend- 
ents of schools for candidates at the various teacliing levels. From the 
registrar's office are sent out complete records of each graduate including a 
summary of his progress in the college and a full report of his student 
teaching. 

Through the advisory program junior college students who are trans- 
ferring to other colleges or who are trying to fi-nd positions are given 
assistance. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The medical staff consists of the college physician, two full-time 
registered nurses, and a full-time practical nurse. The physician maintains 
regular office hours at the college and is on call at all times. 

A physical examination by the college physician is required of all 
students at the time of admission and in the senior year. Additional examin- 
ations are given when conditions warrant. Annual chest x-rays are com- 
pulsory for all students. A student is expected to correct remediable defects 
immediately. Failure to follow the physician's instructions may jeopardize 
a student's status in the college. Health education and prevention of dis- 
ease are essential parts of the health service. 

A student who has a condition or disability which wiU prevent him 
from later qualifying as a teacher is not eligible to take the teachers col- 
lege course. 

A student who has a physical condition which prevents complete 
participation in the regular physical education program may be permitted 
upon authorization of the Committee on Admissions and Standards to take 
a modified program. Such a program gives the student the fundamen- 
tals of physical education necessary for teaching in the elementary or jun- 
ior high school. 

Medical advice and office treatment are free to all students. The 
health center contains rooms for emergency use. 

In case of contagious diseases parents are notified and are required to 
remove the student from the campus for the duration of the disease. 

The college assumes no financial responsibility for illness of sufficient 
seriousness to require hosipitaUzation, x-rays, or special treatment. The 
college does not assume financial responsibihty for any injury incurred on 
the athletic field or in any physical education class. (See p. 1 5 for voluntary 
accident insurance) . 

The children attending the Lida Lee Tall School have the advantages 
of the college health service. 



24 



RESIDENCE HALL ACTIVITIES 

Men and women students in the Residence halls elect as their govern- 
ing bodies a Women's Residence Council and a Men's Residence Council. 
There are also two subordinate bodies of the Women's Residence Council 
known as Prettyman and Newell-Richmond Hall House Councils. These 
councils in cooperation with the residence personnel formulate policies 
pertaining to group living and arrange a program of activities for the 
resident students. 

The college encourages students to attend services in the churches of 
their choice and makes it possible for them to meet the local clergymen. 

Students who are absent frequently over week-ends miss much of the 
education that living at college aflfords. Students are therefore encouraged 
to remain on the campus for as many weekends as possible. 

AUTOMOBILE REGULATIONS 

Parking space on the campus is limited and cannot be guaranteed for 
student parking. Day students who use cars to attend the college are re- 
quired to register their cars with the business office promptly. Parking is 
permitted in specified areas only, and students violating parking regulations 
are subject to fine and other disciplinary action. 

Senior resident students who find it necessary to keep cars on the 
campus must secure from the business office a permit which is issued by the 
business manager with the approval of the Housing Committee. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Participation in student activities is recognized and encouraged as a 
valuable part of the college program. 

Student Government Association 

Enrollment in the college makes one automatically a member of the 
Student Government Association. This is the official coordinating body of 
all student organizations and activities. Its purpose is to maintain academ- 
ic freedom and student rights; to stimulate and improve a democratic 
student government; to improve student cultural, social, and physical 
welfare; and to foster the recognition of the rights and responsibilities of 
students to the college, community, humanity, and God. The Gold and 
White, the student handbook, is published yearly as an official guide. 

Student Residence Councils 

The Men's and Women's Residence Councils, with the co-operation 
of all resident students, are responsible for estabHshing and maintaining 
standards of group Kving and for promoting the social program of the 
residence halls. The Resident Director and her assistants cooperate with 
these groups. 



25 



The Student Center Directory 

The Student Center Directory, a student-faculty group, assumes re- 
sponsibility for the program of the Student Center. 

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 
Freshman Advisory Council 

The Freshman Advisory Council is a trained group of upperclassmen 
V. ho assist with the orientation of freshmen during the first semester. They 
plan the social programs for Freshman Week and act as student counselors 
to small groups of freshmen in matters affecting student social Hfe. 

Marshals 

The Marshals are a service group assisting at convocations, fire drills, 
and at such public functions as the commencement exercises. May Day 
Celebration, and other special programs. They serve also as guides for oflS- 
cial visitors and at conferences. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

The Interfaith Council 

This group is made up of delegates from each of the religious organ- 
izations and coordinates all the religious activities on the campus. 

Interdenominational Clubs 

The Student Christian Association, the oldest religious organization on 
the campus, seeks to unite students in fellowship of the Christian Church 
through worship, study and action. 

The Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship attempts through prayer and 
Bible study to foster personal commitments to Jesus Christ, 

Denominational Organizations 
Baptist Student Union 
Canterbury Club, for Episcopal students 
Christian Science Club 
Jewish Students Association 
Lutheran Students Association 
Newman Club, for Catholic students 
Wesley Club, for Methodist students 
Westminster Fellowship, for Presbyterian students 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 
Glee Club 

The Glee Club, the largest muscial organization on the campus, is a 
chorus of men and women students. It engages in choral work of various 
types and performs at numerous functions on and off campus. (See page 
74.) 



26 



Men's Chorus 

The Men's Chorus is open to all men students who hke to meet to- 
gether and sing, purely for enjoyment. College songs are featured, along 
with barbershop quartet selections. This group performs for various pro- 
grams on and off campus. 

Orchestra 

Membership in the orchestra affords training in ensemble work for 
students who play orchestral instruments. Those especially talented and 
interested may participate in solo and small group work. (See page 74.) 

Student Christian Association Choir 

The Student Christian Association Choir is composed of resident 
women students selected on the basis of talent and interest. The choir sings 
for various programs sponsored by the Student Christian Association and 
for college assemblies. Frequently, the choir is invited to give concerts in 
some of the churches of Baltimore and surrounding communities. 

DRAMATIC ORGANIZATION 

Glen Players 

The Glen Players, the dramatic club of the college, presents a yearly 
program of one-act and full length plays. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

The International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club has been organized to acquaint stu- 
dents with the problems and issues of the day. It sponsors the delegation of 
Towson State Teachers College to the annual Mid-Atlantic United Nations 
Model General Assembly. 

Jazz Club 

The Jazz Club is dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of 
American jazz. The oustanding event of the organization's activities is 
the annual jazz concert. 

Naturalist Club 

The Naturahst Club is an organization of students and alumni inter- 
ested in the natural sciences. Through the media of hikes, excursions, 
lectures, demonstrations, etc., the members are provided with the opportu- 
nity to explore the natural science offerings of the Maryland area. 

Photography Club 

The Photography Club offers the students an opportunity to develop 
skill in the use of the camera. Students learn to process their own films 
and to evaluate their pictures in terms of professional criteria. 



27 



Student National Education Association 

The M. A. Newell Chapter of the Student National Education As- 
sociation is a professional club affiliated with the National Education As- 
sociation and the Maryland State Teachers Association. 

Veteran's Organization 

The Veterans' Organization is composed of students who have actively 
served in the Armed Forces of the United States. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

Every student is a member of either the Men's or "Women's Athletic 
Association. 

Men's Athletic Association 

The college is a member of the Mason-Dixon Conference. The men's 
competitive teams include basketball, soccer, baseball, wrestling, track, 
tennis, lacrosse, and cross country. There are opportunities for participa- 
tion in intramural activities. 

Women's Athletic Association 

The Women's Athletic Association, working in cooperation with 
the Women's Physical Education Department, sponsors a variety of sports 
which include activities appropriate to all levels of skill. These sports consist 
of hockey, soccer, archery, tennis, basketball, bowHng, golf, badminton, 
dancing, swimming, volley ball, and softball. As an outgrowth of this 
elective program, informal sports competition is arranged with other col- 
leges in the area. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Towers 

Towers is a semi-annual literary magazine which encourages creative 
writing among the students. 

Tower Light 

The Tower Light is the bi-weekly student newspaper publication of 
the college. 

Tower Echoes 

Tower Echoes is the yearbook sponsored by the Student Government 
Association and published by the senior class. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary society organized for the 
purpose of encouraging interest in drama among the student body. 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 

Gamma Theta Upsilon is a national honorary fraternity for the pur- 
pose of promoting interest in geography. 



28 



Kappa Delta Pi 

Epsilon Alpha Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, a national honor society, 
was installed at the college in February 1940. Students who meet the re- 
quirements for membership are eligible for election during their junior and 
senior years. Prior to the installation of the Epsilon Alpha Chapter of Kappa 
Delta Pi there was a local honor society at the college, Chi Alpha Sigma. 
Its alumni members are welcome at the meetings of Kappa Delta Pi. 

PROGRAMS AND SPECIAL EVENTS 

The Student Government Association and the college sponsor a series 
of events designed to enrich the educational and cultural program on the 
campus. The programs are planned jointly by the program committee and 
the student assembly committee. Students, faculty and interested members 
of the community are invited to attend these events. Included in the series 
are performances by musical groups, lectures and discussions by outstand- 
ing scholars and citizens, art exhibitions, dance demonstrations, traditional 
and commemorative programs. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

The college calendar, which will be found on pages 5 and 6, indicates 
the dates when students must register. Students are not permitted to attend 
classes without having completed registration, and a fee is assessed for 
registration after the time assigned (see Expenses, page 16). In addition 
to payment of the fee, students who register later than one week after 
the first day of classes must secure permission from the Committee on 
Admissions and Standards. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal student load is 15 to 17 semester hours of credit each 
semester. No student may carry a program in excess of seventeen hours 
without special permission from the Dean of Students or the Committee 
on Admissions and Standards. (Such permission is usually granted for 18 
semester hours if the student has a cumulative average of 2.50 and for 19 
hours if the average is 3.00 or better.) Blanks for requesting permission 
to carry fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained in the Regis- 
trar's Office. 

Students who are on academic probation, who have health problems 
or who are carrying heavy programs of work outside of the college may 
be required by the Dean of Students or the Committee on Admissions and 
Standards to carry less than a normal load of classes. 

AUDITING COURSES 

With the consent of the instructor, a student may request permission 
to audit a course in which he has a particular interest. If the auditing of 
the course will not constitute an excessive load, such permission is usually 
granted by the Dean of Instruction or the Dean of Students. If there is 



29 



any question, the request is referred to the Admissions and Standards 
Committee. No credit is to be earned in courses which are audited. 

CHANGE OF COURSE OR SCHEDULE 

The Dean of Instruction approves requests for course changes during 
the first week; thereafter, requests for changes are made to the Dean of 
Students. Ordinarily no change may be made after the first week of classes 
except for reasons beyond the student's control. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified according to the number of semester hours 
completed as follows: freshmen, 0-30 semester hours; sophomores, 30-60 
semester hours; junior, 60-90 semester hours; senior, above 90 semester 
hours. 

MARKING AND POINT SYSTEM 

A five-point marking system (A, B, C, D, F) is used to indicate quali- 
ty of academic work. The letter A designates work of superior quality; B, 
v/ork of quality substantially better than minimum requirement for grad- 
uation; C, work of satisfactory quality meeting the minimum requirements 
for graduation; D, work of less than satisfactory quaUty but allowable for 
credit, subject to the restrictions specified under Degree Requirements, 
page 34; F, work of such unsatisfactory quality that no credit is given. 
A mark of Inc. (incomplete because of illness or other reason beyond con- 
trol of the student) at the end of a semester carries no credit. Unless such 
a course is satisfactorily completed within three weeks after the Inc. is re- 
ceived, the grade for the course becomes F. The mark given for a course 
which carries no credit will be S (satisfatory) or U (unsatisfactory). 

The academic average of each stttdent is determined by assigning 
numerical values to the letter grades and weighting according to the 
number of class hours. The values assigned are: A, 4 points; B, 3; C, 2; 
D, 1 ; F, 0. The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in that 
course, totaling the credit hours and points for all courses completed, 
and dividing the total number of points by the total number of credit 
hours. A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required for graduation. An 
average of better than 3.00 is usually worthy of special mention. 

STANDARDS OF WORK REQUIRED 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain at least the 
following cumulative averages: Freshmen, 1.70; Sophomores, 1.80; Juniors, 
1.90; Seniors, 2.00. Students are placed on probation when the cumulative 
average is below the minimum standard for their class. 

Probation indicates uncertainty on the part of the college as to the 
student's probable success. Probation is lifted when the student shows 
satisfactory improvement in his work. A probationary student who fails 
to show such improvement may be asked to leave the college. The complete 
records of such students are reviewed by the Committee on Admissions 
and Standards at the close of each semester. 



30 



Failure in a course usually delays graduation from the college. How- 
ever, a student may attend a summer session here or with the permission of 
the Committee on Admissions and Standards attend elsewhere and transfer 
the earned credit to the college. As a rule a student may not repeat a course 
more than once. 

Entering students who are defective in speech and/or hearing are re- 
ferred to the Speech Division for testing and required to take a course in 
Corrective Speech. 

Freshmen are required to take a course in Fundamentals of Speech. Ex- 
emption from the required course is granted if the student passes a per- 
formance test given by two members of the Speech Division. The perform- 
ance test must be taken before the end of the first week of the course in 
Fundamentals of Speech. Those who thus qualify for exemption may choose 
an advanced course in speech or an elective in another field. 

Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking English 
122, Fundamentals of Speech, are required to satisfy the requirement of 
English 100, Corrective Speech, before being recommended for graduation. 

In general, a student is ready to enter the block of professional courses 
when: (a) he has met the orientation and speech requirements, (b) he has 
completed all required freshmen and sophomore courses (totaling at least 
60 hours) with an average of 1.8 or higher, (c) he has cleared any failing 
grades in required courses from his record, and (d) he has received the ap- 
proval of the director of his division. Deviations from these requirements 
may be made only with the approval of the Committee on Admissions and 
Standards. 

A student who makes more than one D grade in professional courses 
during the semester preceding student teaching will not be permitted to 
enter student teaching. If the student is allowed to remain in the college, 
he must repeat the professional courses in which he received D grades. 

In order to be eligible to enter student teaching a student must have 
earned a minimum cumulative average of 1.8. 

A student must have earned a minimum cumulative average of 2,0 
to be eligible to hold a major oflSce in any student organization or to repre- 
sent the college as an official delegate. 

The personal development of each student is considered. If the Com- 
mitfee on Admissions and Standards is convinced that a student does not 
have the qualijications necessary for teaching, he may be asked at any time 
to u'ithdraw from the college. 

ATTENDANCE 

A student-faculty attendance committee, responsible to the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Standards, administers the college attendance 
policy. 

The college attendance policy places responsibility on the student for 
attending classes and for filing reasons for absence from classes. Students 



31 



should file within 48 hours after their return to college, on the official 
blank, a record of each absence except those for college-sponsored events. 
A record of absence for medical reasons will be filed at the Health Center. 
A record of absence for personal reasons will be filed at Stephens Hall in 
Room 109. 

No absences are permitted on the day preceding or the day following 
a hohday except by prior approval of the Attendance Committee. No ab- 
sences from final examinations are permitted except by prior approval of 
the Attendance Committee. Absences from examinations because of emer- 
gency illness or accident should be reported to the Office of the Dean of 
Students immediately by telephone. All students are reminded that semester 
examinations are scheduled on Saturdays and that unexcused absence from 
a final examination constitutes a failure. 

LENGTH OF ATTENDANCE 

Only in unusual cases may a student remain in the junior college 
for longer than four semesters, or in the teachers college for longer than 
eight semesters. Any requests for deviation from this plan must be sub- 
mitted to the Admissions and Standards Committee a month prior to the 
end of a semester. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A student wishing to withdraw should see the Dean of Students, who 
will provide the form needed to make the withdrawal official. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of a student's record will be sent to other educational 
institutions and organizations only upon written request of the student 
concerned. The first transcript is issued free of charge. A charge of one 
dollar is made for each subsequent transcript and should be enclosed with 
the request. A supplement of one semester's work only will be furnished for 
fifty cents. Upon a student's graduation a transcript is sent to the Mary- 
land State Department of Education. When requested, transcripts are sent 
to the Baltimore City Department of Education. No charge is made at any 
time for transcripts sent to either of these departments in Maryland. One 
copy of the student's record marked "not an official transcript" is fur- 
nished free to the student upon graduation. At any time, a student may 
have an official copy on written request and payment of one dollar. It is 
not the policy of the college to issue official transcripts directly to stu- 
dents and graduates. 

A student who withdraws from the teacher education program before 
graduation and reqixests a transcript for the purpose of continuing his 
college education must first reimburse the college for whatever educa- 
tion he has received tuition-free (see Liability For Unpaid Tuition page 
19). 



32 



AWARDS AND HONORS 

At the time of senior investiture, an honors Ust which includes the 
names of those students in each class with semester averages above the 
ninetieth percentile is announced. No student is included in this list whose 
average is below 3.0. On each semester's list, the number of times a student 
has been cited for honors is indicated. This list is also pubUshed in the 
Tower Light. 

At the graduation exercises the three students having the highest 
senior averages are given special recognition. 

A special gift from Mary Hudson Scarborough, a former faculty 
member, provides an award of fifty dollars for the senior student showing 
greatest achievement in the knowledge and teaching of arithmetic. 

Three national honor societies. Alpha Psi Omega, Gamma Theta 
Upsilon, and Kappa Delta Pi give recognition to outstanding students 
in the areas of dramatics, geography, and education. (See page 28.) 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

THE TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum of the teachers college includes courses of a general 
uature designed to produce cultured, well-informed citizens. It includes 
also professional courses designed to give students some competence in 
working with children. Opportunities are provided for students to spend 
considerable time in typical classrooms, first observing, then participating 
and finally assuming complete responsibility for the direction of the class. 

Approximately three-fourths of the course offerings are in the sciences, 
the arts, the social sciences, and the humanities, which constitute the 
bases of a well-rounded college education. For the teachers this general 
education is important not only for personal satisfaction and individual 
adjustment, but also as a background to aid maturing individuals find their 
place in the world. 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Students who are interested in a special subject field may take 
additional courses beyond the required work. There are several subject 
fields in which students may, with the guidance of their advisers, plan 
an area of concentration. These are: art, English, mathematics, music, psy- 
chology, science, and social science. Such a concentration is helpful for 
those intending to do graduate work in these fields and for those planning to 
teach these subjects in the junior high school. Approximately fourteen 
hours of electives in a special field may be taken by any student. With the 
approval of the student's adviser, and the subsequent approval of the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Standards, additional hours may be taken in one 
field. Requirements for these areas of concentration are described in con- 
nection with the courses of instruction of the respective departments. 



33 



Some students, particularly those in the elementary, kindergarten- 
primary, and junior high school core programs, may choose to broaden 
their general education rather than develop an area of concentration. In 
doing so they will select courses representing various fields of knowledge 
that will be of help to them as elementary school teachers. 

About one-fourth of the work at Towson is in the field of education, 
divided approximately equally between college courses and experiences in 
typical classrooms. The professional emphasis may prepare the student for 
kindergarten-primary, elementary or junior high school teaching. 

All students who satisfactorily complete the teachers college program 
qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements for 
graduation as set forth in the college catalogue. When the requirements 
are changed after a student has enrolled in the college, the student has 
the option of meeting in full the requirements that were in effect at the 
time of entrance or those that are in effect at the time of graduation. 
The student's adviser assists in the planning of a program, but the final 
responsibility for meeting the requirements for graduation rests with the 
student. 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements will 
receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. College credit of one hundred twenty-eight semester hours. 

2. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has elected. 

3. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

4. Fulfillment of the speech requirement. (See page 31.) 

5. Certification by the college physician of abiUty to meet the 
physical standards required for admission to the retirement sys- 
tem of the State of Maryland. 

6. Record of attendance at the college for at least one college year 
during which thirty semseter hours of credit were earned. A stu- 
dent is expected to earn his final 30 credits at the college unless 
he receives special permission to the contrary. 

7. A satisfactory demonstration of the qualities which are basic to 
the ethical standards necessary in the teaching profession. 



34 



CERTIFICATES 

Each graduate of the State Teachers College is eligible to receive a 
Bachelor of Science Certificate in Kindergarten-Primary, Elementary, or 
Junior High School Education from the State Department of Education. 
This certificate is valid for teaching in the counties of the state for three 
years and is renewable upon evidence of successful experience and profes- 
sional spirit. 

Graduates who wish to teach in Baltimore City must take the pro- 
fessional examinations, the successful completion of which places them on 
the eligible list to teach in the elementary grades or junior high schools of 
the Baltimore City system. 



35 



REQUIRED COURSES 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the Teachers College 101-102 no credit 

Orientation for Transfer Students 5-103 no credit 

ART 4 credits 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 14 credits 

Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Speech 122 2 credits 

English Literature 204 3 credits 

American Literature 307 or 308 

or English Literature 205 3 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 3 credits 

Personal Hygiene 105 1 credit 

Individual and School Health 305 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 3 credits 

Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 4 credits 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 credits 

Physical Education 101-102; 201-202 4 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Developmental Psychology I 205 3 credits 

SCIENCE 12 credits 

Biological Science 101-102 6 credits 

Physical Science 202-203 6 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 18 credits 

Elements of Geography 103-104 6 credits 

History of Western Civilization 121-122 6 credits 

History of the United States 221-222 6 credits 

EDUCATION 3 5 credits 

Kindergarten-Primary courses (See page 37.) 

Elementary School courses (See page 37.) 

Junior High School courses (See page 37.) 
ELECTIVES 28 credits 

TOTAL SEMESTER CREDITS 128 

36 



COURSES REQUIRED IN EDUCATION 
KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY DIVISION 

EDUCATION 35 credits 

Developmental Psychology II 206 3 credits 

The Child and His Curriculum 340-345 12 credits 

Experiences with Music for 

Young Children 346 2 credits 

Reading Program for Young Children 347 2 credits 

Directed Teaching 303, 304 15 credits 

Seminar in Education 461 1 credit 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DIVISION 

EDUCATION 3 5 credits 

Developmental Psychology II 206 3 credits 

The Child and His Curriculum 361-364, 369 10 credits 

Art and the Child 371 2 credits 

Music and Elementary School Education 372 2 credits 

The Teaching of Physical Education in 

the Elementary School 373 1 credit 

Physical Education Activities 374 1 credit 

Directed Teaching 303, 404 15 credits 

Seminar in Education 461 1 credit 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION 

EDUCATION 35 credits 
Field Studies on The Adolescent 

and His Community 250 1 credit 

Introduction to the Junior High School 359 4 credits 

The Adolescent and His Curriculum 

Psychology 307; Ed. 352, 355, 415, 461 10 credits 

Choices from 353, 354, 356, 357 2 credits 

Elective from 331, 375, 379, 402, 451, 

452, 20.323 3 credits 

Directed Teaching 303-404 15 credits 

SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

The prescribed sequences of courses for the degree in Kindergarten- 
Primary, Elementary, and Junior High School Education are outlined on 
the following pages. No deviations are permitted except at the recom- 
mendation of the Admission and Standards Committee. Students in the 
Kindergarten-Primary, Elementary, and Junior High School divisions will 
be assigned to Program A or Program B at the end of the freshmen year 
and are expected to adhere to that program. Transfer students and others 
unable to meet graduation requirements under the regular programs are 
urged to plan curriculum patterns during the first semester at the college 
in conference with the director of the division in which they plan to major. 



37 



SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

For The Degree In 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 

FRESHMEN YEAR 



0.101 

5.103 

1.103 
6.102 

6.122 
8.105 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



Semester I 
Orientation to Teachers 

College 

Orientation for Transfer 

Students 

Fundamentals of Design 2 
GDmposition & Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech .... 2 

Personal Hygiene 

Music Appreciation 

Physical Education 1 

Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography .... 3 
History of "Western 

Civilization 3 

Total 17 



Semester II 

0.102 Orientation to Teachers 

College 

5.103 Orientation for Transfer 

Students 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design 

6.103 Composition & Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

6.122 Fimdamentals of Speech 

8.105 Personal Hygiene 1 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.102 Biological Science 3 

30.104 Elements of Geography 3 

30.122 History of Western 

Civilization 3 

Total 16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Mvisic Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 



Total 



15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A 

Semester I Semester II 

5.340-345 Education Block 12 5.303-404 Directed Teaching 

5.346 Experiences With Music 

for Young Children 2 

Eleaives 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 

SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A 



15 



Semester I 
5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.347 Reading Program for Young 

Children 2 

Electives 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Electives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 



58 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Sttnester I 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR - PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

Electives 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

5.340-345 Education Block 12 

5.346 Experiences with Music for 

Young Children 2 

Electives 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 

Semester I Semester II 

5.303-404 Direaed Teaching 15 5.461 Seminar in Principles and 

Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.347 Reading Programs for 

Young Children 2 

Electives 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 



Note: Students may choose to use their electives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may select an area of concentration in the department 
of art, English, music, mathematics, psychology, science, or social science. For three 
of these departments the following special considerations are pointed out: 

English — students in the kindergarten-primary division will select Program 
B in the sophomore year and will take English in place of the three-hour elective 
in Semester I. 

Mathematics — students in the kindergarten-primary division preferring a con- 
centration in mathematics would need to defer American History to the junior 
year or obtain permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Science — students in the kindergarten-primary division choosing concentration 
I in science would need to defer American History to the junior year or obtain 
permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 



39 



SEQUENCE OF COURSES 
For Tke Degree In 

elejvientary education 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Semester I 



Semester II 



0.101 Orientation to Teachers 

College 

5.103 Orientation for Transfer 

Students 

1.103 

6.102 

6.122 

8.105 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



0.102 
5.103 



Fundamentals of Design .... 


2 


1.103 


Composition and Introduc- 




6.103 


tion to Literature 


3 




Fundamentals of Speech .... 


2 


6.122 


Personal Hygiene 




8.105 


Music Appreciation 




13.103 


Physical Education 


i" 


16.102 


Biological Science 


3 


17.102 


Elements of Geography 


3 


30.104 


History of Western Civili- 




30.122 


zation 


3 

17 




Total 





Orientation to Teachers 

College 

Orientation for Transfer 

Students 

Fundamentals of Design 

Composition and Introduc- 
tion to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Music Appreciation 2 

Physical Education 1 

Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography 3 

History of Western Civili- 
zation 3 

Total 16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.221 American History 3 

Eleaives 2 

Total 15 to 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Semester I 
5.360-369 Education Block 10 

5.372 Music in Elementary School 

Education 2 

5.373 The Teaching of Physical 

Education in the Elemen- 
tary School 1 

Electives 3 or 4 

Total 16 or 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

30.222 American History 3 

Electives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



PROGRAM A 

Semester II 
5.303-404 Direaed Teaching 



15 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A 



Semester I 
5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.371 Art and The Child 2 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Electives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

5.374 Physical Education Activi- 
ties 1 

Electives 11 or 13 

Total 15 to 17 



40 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

11.204 Fundamental Concepts of 

Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Elertives 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

6.205, 307, or 308 Literature 3 

5.374 Physical Education Activi- 
ties 1 

20.206 Developmental Psy- 
chology II 3 

Elertives 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 
5.360-369 Education Block 10 

5.372 Music in Elementary 

School Education 2 

5.373 The Teaching of Physical 

Education in the Elemen- 
tary School 1 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester I 
5.303-404 Direrted Teaching 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM B 

Semester II 
15 5.461 Seminar in Principles and 
Problems of Education 

for Seniors 1 

5.371 Art and The Child 2 

8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

Electives 10 to 12 

Total 15 to 17 



Note: Students may choose to use their elertives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may selert an area of concentration in the department 
of art, English, mathematics, music, psychology, science, or social science. For four 
of these departments the following special considerations are pointed out: 

Art — Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in Art will 
selert Program B in the Sophomore year. 

English — Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in 
English will selert Program A in the Sophomore year. 

Mathematics — Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in 
mathematics would need to defer American History to the junior year or obtain 
permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

Science — Students in the elementary division choosing Concentration I in 
science would need to defer American History in the junior year or obtain per- 
mission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 



41 



0.101 

5.103 

J. 103 
6.102 

6.122 
8.105 
13.103 
16.101 
17.101 
30.103 
30.121 



SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

For The Degree In 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Semester 1 

Orientation to Teachers 
College 

Orientation for Transfer 
Students 

Fundamentals of Design .... 2 

Composition and Intro- 
duction to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech .... 2 

Personal Hygiene 

Music Appreciation 

Physical Education 



Biological Science 3 

Elements of Geography .... 3 
History of Western Civili- 
zation 3 

Total 17 



0.102 

5.103 

1.103 
6.103 

6.122 
8.105 
13.103 
16.102 
17.102 
30.104 
30.122 



Semester II 
Orientation to Teachers 

College 

Orientation for Tranfer 

Students 

Fundamentals of Design 

Composition and Intro- 
duction to Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Music Appreciation 2 

1 
3 
3 



Physical Education 

Biological Science 

Elements of Geography . 
History of Western Civili- 
zation 

Total 



3 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR -PROGRAM A* 



Semester I 

6.204 English Literature 3 

11.204 Fvmdamental Concepts 

of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

17.202 Physical Science 3 

30.221 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 
5.250 Field Studies on the Ado- 
lescent and His Com- 
munity 1 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

17.203 Physical Science 3 

30.222 History of the United 

States 3 

Electives 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A* 



Semester I 
8.305 Individual and School 

Health 2 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

20.205 Developmental Psy- 
chology I 3 

Electives 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

5.395 Introduction to Junior 

High School 4 

Elertives 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



''' Program B is identical to program A except that "Field Studies on the 
Adolescent and His Community" is taken in the first semester. 

■•^^ Program B is identical to Program A except that "Introduction to 
Junior High School" is taken in the first semester. 



42 



SENIOR YEAR -PROGRAM A and B* 



Required Courses 

5.303-404 Direrted Teaching .... 15 

5.352 Language Arts in the Jun- 
ior High School 2 

5.355 Measurement in the Jun- 
ior High School 2 

5.415 Audio-Visual Workshop .... 2 
20.307 Adolescent Psychology 3 

5.461 Senior Seminar in Princi- 
ples and Problems of 
Education 1 



Methods Courses (choose two) 

5.353 The Teaching of Science in 

the Junior High 

School 2 

5.354 The Teaching of Social 

Studies in the Junior High 
School 2 

5.356 The Teaching of English 

in the Junior High 

School 2 

5.357 The Teaching of Mathemat- 

ics in the Junior High 
School 2 



Electives 

5.375 Physical Education Activi- 
ty for the Junior High 
School 2 

5.379 Guidance in The Public 

School 2 

5.451 Core Techniques in the 

Junior Hi^ School 2 

5.452 Workshop in Creative Ac- 

tivities for the Junior 

HUgh School 2 

20.323 Psychology of the Ex- 
ceptional Child 2 

A second Methods Course 

(see those listed above) .. 2 



Note: Students may choose to use their electives in planning a broad background 
of general education or they may select an area of concentration in the department 
of English, mathematics, science, or social science. 



■'' Students in Program A do their "Directed Teaching" in the first and 
third quarters. Those in Program B do their "Directed Teaching" in the 
second and fourth quarters. 



43 



THE JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAM 

The junior college was inaugurated in September, 1946, with a 
curriculum comparable to the first two years of a liberal arts college. 
Courses are offered which will permit a student to transfer to various 
senior colleges without difficulty or loss of time. Physical education is re- 
quired each year, except for students who may be excused for health or 
other reasons by the Dean of Instruction. 

The professional fields to which a number of junior college students 
transfer include law, journalism, business administration, and other non- 
technical professions. It is usually advisable for a student planning a 
technical program such as medicine or engineering to transfer at the end 
of one year rather than two, as the curriculum at present does not pro- 
vide the special subjects needed in the second year. 

Some junior college students are interested in teaching but at the 
time of entrance are undecided about the level which they prefer. If 
such students decide to teach in senior high school, they transfer, after 
two years, to other colleges in Maryland where they may prepare for 
teaching the subjects of their choice. Junior college students who decide 
they wish to teach in the kindergarten-primary, elementary or junior high 
school programs may apply for transfer to the teacher-education program 
of this college. All such applications for transfer must be presented to the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards. 

The degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to junior college students 
who satisfactorily complete a minimum of sixty-four hours of credit in an 
approved program. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements will 
receive the Associate in Arts degree. 

1. College credit totaling sixty-four semester hours, including the 

following background work in the humanities, natural sciences, 

and social sciences: 

English 102-103 Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 6 credits 

Art, Drama, Foreign Language, Music, Philosophy, 

Literature, Speech 2 to 6 credits 

Natural Sciences: Biological Principles, Physical 

Science, Chemistry, Physics 6 to 8 credits 

Social Sciences: Any course 100-300 level 6 credits 

Physical Education 4 credits 

Orientation to the Junior College credits 

Requests for exceptions to these requirements may be presented 
to the Admissions and Standards Committee, if they differ radi- 
cally from the requirements of the college to which the indivi- 
dual plans to transfer, or if other sufficient reasons are presented. 

2. A cumulative average of at least 1.80. 

3. Record of attendance at the college for at least two semesters 
during which 3 semester hours of credit were earned. 



44 



SUGGESTED COURSE PATTERNS 
FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

General Arts and Science* 

(By choosing proper elertives students may prepare for later specialization in 
fields such as Humanities, Social Studies, Science, Mathematics.) 



First Year Sem. Hrs. 

Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin. 
or 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 2 

or 

Elective 2-3 

**Mod. Lang. Elements or Inter- 
mediate French, German 
or Spanish 6 

P.E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32-33 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 121-122 Hist, of 

Western Civilization 
or 
Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of 

the United States 6 

**Mod. Language Intermedi- 
ate, Advanced 6 

Electives (Mathematics, Soc. Sci., 
English, Music, Art, 

etc.) 12-14 

P.E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32-34 



Pre-Nursing* 



First Year Sem, Hrs. 

Or. 109-110 Orientation to the Jr. 

College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

218 Public Speaking 2 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

**Mod. Lang. Elements or Inter- 
mediate French, German 

or Spanish 6 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32 



Eng. 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of the 
United States 
or 

Soc. Sci. 121-122 Hist, of West. 

Civilization 6 

Psych. 201-202 General Psy- 
chology 6 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 

** Modern Lang. Intermediate, 
Advanced 
or 

Electives 6 

P. E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 



32 

•These patterns may be followed to prepare students to continue their studies in a 
number of Maryland colleges and universities. They may be varied, however, in 
accordance with requirements of the institutions to which they plan to transfer. 

••If a new language is started in the freshman year it is usually continued in the 
sophomore year; if the intermediate course is taken in the freshman year, a 
student has the choice of taking a third year of language or using these hours for 
electives in other fields. 



45 



Pre-Law* 



Second Year Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 204-205 English Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 221-222 Hist, of the 

United States 6 

**Mod. Lang. Intermediate, 

Advanced 6 

Electives 12 

P. E. 201-202 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32 



First Year Sem. Hrs. 

Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin. 
or 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 2 

* *Mod. Lang. Elements or 

Intermediate French, 
German or Spanish 6 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

~ 32 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Or Business Administration* 

( Students planning to follow these programs may be advised to transfer at the end 
of one year in the junior college in order to get necessary specialized subjeas in 
the second year. Additional courses in science and mathematics have been added 
that may provide a second year.) 



Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental 

Sem. Hrs. 
Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

English 102-103 Comp. and Lit. .... 6 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

Sci. 206-207 General Chemistry .... 8 
Math. 111-113 College Algebra, 

Trig, and Analytics 7 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sci. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

'37 



Business Administration 

Sem. Hrs. 
Or. 109-110 Orientation to the 

Junior College 

Eng. 102-103 Comp. and Lit 6 

Sci. 104-105 Biological Prin 8 

Math. 105-106 Business Math., 

Math, of Finance 6 

Eng. 122 Fundamentals of 

Speech 2 

Soc. Sci. 301 Intro, to Sociology .... 3 

Soc. Sd. 306 Gov't, of the U.S 3 

Eng. 218 Public Speaking 
or 

Elective 2-3 

P. E. 101-102 Physical Educa- 
tion 2 

32-33 

*These patterns may be followed to prepare students to continue their studies in a 
number of Maryland colleges and universities. They may be varied, however, in 
accordance with requirements of the institution to which they plan to transfer. 

* *If a new language is started in the freshman year it is usually continued in the 
sophomore year; if the intermediate course is taken in the freshman year, a student 
has the choice of taking a third year of language or using these hours for eleaives 
in other fields. 



46 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



THE MEANING OF COURSE NUMBERS 

Each department of the college has a code number, shown in paren- 
theses at the head of the department announcement. Each course 
has a distinctive number, with the following significance: Courses 
numbered 100-199 inclusive are primarily for freshmen, 200-299 
primarily for sophomores, 300-399 primarily for juniors, and 400-499 
primarily for seniors. Students may register for courses one level 
above or one level below their classification. Seniors are expected to 
confine themselves to 300 courses and higher, unless the curriculum 
pattern for the degree specifies particular 200 courses in the senior 
year. 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a hyphen 
are to be taken in sequence throughout a year. When course numbers 
are separated by a comma, either semester may be taken independently 
of the other. 

"a" COURSES 

For all courses numbered with the addition of the letter "a" the fol- 
lowing explanation applies: for the additional credit hour, students are 
required to do extra work in areas of special interest under direction 
of the instructor. 

Permission to register for any course carrying the letter "a" must be 
obtained from the instructor of the course at registration time only. 
A student electing the additional hour credit may not change the 
value of the course after the second week of the semester. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Students normally may elect 14 or 15 of the 28 elective credits in 
one department. They may exceed 1 4 or 15 without special permission 
whenever (1) one credit of the last course taken is needed to bring 
the credit to 14 in that department or (2) the total number of 
semester hours exceeds 128. 

Students feeling the need of more than 14 or 15 hours in building an 
area of concentration may request permission of the Admissions 
and Standards Committee to earn additional hours after obtaining 
approval of their adviser. 

TIME OF OFFERING 

A course is offered every semester of every year, unless the semester 
or the semester and year of offering is specified. All non-required 
courses are offered subject to sufficient enrollment. 



47 



NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

Courses for which there is no organized department in the college 
are: 

101-102 ORIENTATION TO THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

2 hours per week, two semesters. {No credit.) 

An introduction to social and academic aspects of college livmg, with 
individual and group guidance leading to more effective use of the educa- 
tional opportunities offered by the college. 

Through a series of experiences in observation and participation with 
children ranging from kindergarten through junior high school in pubUc 
schools in the Baltimore metropoHtan area, students are introduced to the 
purposes and practices of public education. 

109-110 ORIENTATION TO THE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

One hour a week for one semester and at least six meetings during the sec- 
ond semester. (No credit.) 

Lectures and discussions on: study habits and budgeting of time; note 
taking; reading skills; general education and history of junior college 
movement; rules and regulations of the college; grading system; graduation 
requirements; career opportunities and planning. 

During the second semester representatives of various professions tnd 
colleges are invited to the college to participate in career conferences which 
aid junior college students in making plans for their careers and further 
study after completion of the junior college program. 
(Required of all junior college freshmen unless excused by the Dean of 
Instruction.) 

ORIENTATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS (5.103 p. 58) 

302 RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICA 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Ideas, forms of organization and emphasis of Protestantism, Cathol- 
icism and Judaism; trends in religious thought as related to American 
culture. 

302a Same as 302. 2 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

401 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of issues and movements in contemporary philosophy in the 
light of representative thinkers of the major schools of thought, and a con- 
sideration of their significance. A critical examination of influential works. 

Open to teachers college juniors and seniors who have had History 
121 or its equivalent, and to graduate students, by permission of the 
instructor. 



48 



ART (1) 

Mr. Miller (Chairman), Mr. Guillaume, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Nass, 
Mr. Pollack, Mrs. Schwartz, Miss Zindler. 

The art courses provide students with means for self-expression, 
contribute to the growth of appreciation, and stimulate cultural pursuits. 
Design as related to our contemporary environment is stressed. Theories 
of art education are explored. Museum visits and field trips supplement 
classroom work. 

Fundamentals of Design (1.103) and Art in the Culture (1.203) are 
reqtxired of all teachers college students. Elementary education students 
are required, in addition, to take Art and the Child (5.371). 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN ART 

The purpose of an area of concentration in art is to provide a planned 
selection of elective courses beyond the art requirement of four credit 
hours. Students may select an area of concentration in order to become 
effective teachers in utilizing creative activities; to prepare for teaching 
in the fields of art and art education; to prepare for further study at the 
graduate level in art and art education; to further their general education 
in art and art history at the undergraduate level. 

Required courses are: 210 Drawing and the Appreciation of Drawing; 
330 Beginning Painting; 321 The History of Art; Ancient through Ren- 
aissance, or 322 History of Art; Baroque through Contemporary; 340 Be- 
ginning Sculpture. The area of concentration may be completed by the se- 
lection of 5 additional credit hours in art. 

Students in the elementary division preferring a concentration in Art 
will select Program B in the Sophomore year. 

103 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 

3 hours per lueek. (Credit 2 hours.) 

An investigation of line, form, color, texture, spatial relationships. 

203 ART IN THE CULTURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A study of design in architecture, craft, and plastic and graphic arts 
of contemporary civilizations. The interaction between these and other 
forces which mold the culture. The expressive possibilities of many 
materials. 

210 DRAWING AND THE APPRECIATION OF DRAWING 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

An investigation of the problems of expressive draftmanship in 
theory and practice. 



49 



304 GRAPHICS 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Sevpester 1960-61. 

Study and pratice of lithography, etching, and wood block printing 
as creative art. Drawing and printing, lectures, demonstration and 
criticisms. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 

305 THE ART OF PUPPETRY AND MARIONETTE 
PRODUCTION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Design and construction of puppets and marionetttes; adapting plays, 
stories, and events; designing and constructing scenery; lighting and pro- 
duction. Emphasis on application of this art to the public school. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 

306 ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours). Second Semester 1963-64. 

The study of basic ideas underlying the organization of space and 
materials for human needs. Lectures, slides, and field trips will be used to 
convey both contemporary and historical aspects of the design of residen- 
ces, schools, public, commercial, and industrial buildings. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 

310 DESIGNING WITH MATERIALS 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

A study of the art possibiUties of wood, clay, plastics, cloth, paper, 
paint, and dye, and the use of tools necessary to their development. 

314 THE ART OF ENAMELING ON METAL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours). First Semester 1961-62. 

A practical acquaintance with the essentials of design as applied to 
the art of enameling on copper and silver. The appreciation of master 
works of enameling from medieval to contemporary times. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 

320 EXHIBITION TECHNIQUES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

Materials, techniques, and methods for the aesthetic presentation of 
educative materials for all levels of teaching. The design of bulletin 
boards, exhibit spaces, display tables, and the staging of assembly and 
holiday programs. 

Prerequisite: 102 and 103, or consent of instructor. 

320a Same as 320. 4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 



JO 



321 THE HISTORY OF ART: ANCIENT THROUGH 
RENAISSANCE 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The development of art theory, forms and materials as seen in 
historical perspective. Readings, museum trips and research. Emphasis 
upon Renaissance art and its origins in ancient and medieval forms. 

322 HISTORY OF ART: BAROQUE THROUGH 
CONTEMPORARY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

The origins of contemporary art as revealed by the 17th, 18 th, and 
19th centuries. Museum trips and study of contemporary collections. 

330 BEGINNING PAINTING 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

A general studio course emphasizing expression in painting. Many 
media are investigated and different theories of painting explored through 
lecture, discussion and individual work. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203, or consent of the instructor. 

331 CERAMICS 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61 

The creative possibilities of ceramic materials. Lectures and discussions 
on materials, technique and design. Museum trips. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203, or consent of instructor. 

340 BEGINNING SCULPTURE 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Introduction to the materials of sculpture, and an investigation of 
their special qualities as they relate to the creative process. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 

371 ART AND THE CHILD 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 371. Description on page 55. 

414 SPECIAL ART PROBLEMS 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

Practice for advanced students in their fields of special interest. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



51 



420 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 

4 hotns per -week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

A study of major art education problems at all levels. Materials and 
skills in relation to classroom needs. Participation with children in the 
developing, planning, and carrying through of projects. 

Prerequisite: 371. 

EDUCATION (5) 

Mr. Abendroth, Mr. Anderson, Miss Bent, Miss Broyles, Mr. Bur- 
RiER, Mr. Cornthwaite, Miss Fitzgerald, Mr. Hartley (Chairman), 
Mr. Holler, Mr. Moser, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Saxton, Mrs. Velie, Mr. 
Williamson. 

Faculty members from other departments participate in teaching the 
education courses. 

The teacher education program provides many opportunities for 
students to work with and study children. Professional laboratory ex- 
periences begin in the freshman year and are an integral part of the work 
of each of the succeeding years. During the junior and senior years the 
study of children continues and broadens to include experiences in observ- 
ing and teaching different age groups in several schools. As students ac- 
quire a background in the social and natural sciences and the arts, and 
gain skill in communication, they learn to make these function in their 
teaching. 

COURSES IN KINDERGARTEN AND 
PRIMARY EDUCATION 

340 THE CHILD AND HIS CURRICULUM 

13 hotirs per iveek. {Credit 12 hours.) 

A series of interrelated experiences in college classes and in nearby 
public schools, dealing with problems of the teaching-learning process 
from kindergarten through third grade. Experiences in teaching and 
learning in the early grades are provided in the following areas: 

341 THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY CURRICULUM 

4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours — Part of 12 hotir course.) 

Research and experimentation in human growth and development 
analyzed and evaluated in terms of the individual's needs, interests, and 
responsibilities. Participation one day each week throughout the semester 
in the classrooms of nearby public schools. 

342 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRI- 
MARY GRADES 

2 hours per iveek. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 12 hour course.) 

Research and guided learning in listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Ways of teaching beginning reading and writing. 



52 



343 ARITHMETIC IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 12 hour course.) 

Readings, discussions and observations to discover stages in the de- 
velopment of children's ability to perform quantitative thinking. Students 
will select, design and evaluate learning activities that enlarge, structure, 
and enrich the number concepts of young children. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204. 

344 WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE EXPERIENCES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 12 our course.) 

Activities designed to aid in the understanding of the creative process. 
Class discussion. Experiments with various art materials, melody, oral and 
written language, and rhythmic movement. 

345 SCIENCE IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 12 hour course.) 

The use of school and community resources in developing the child's 
ability to use and understand science ideas. Ways in which a child's natural 
curiosity may be guided towards an exploration and understanding of fund- 
amental scientific concepts. 

346 EXPERIENCES WITH MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Ways in which experiences with music promote self-expression and 
self-reaHzation. Singing games, singing, rhythmic movement, and rhythm- 
band activities. Class discussion and laboratory work with children. 

347 READING PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 
2 hoti^rs per tveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Exploration of special interests arising out of field experiences in the 
teaching of reading. 

Prerequisite: Education 342. 

To be taken following student teaching. 

303 and 404 DIRECTED TEACHING 
{Credit 15 hours.) 

Teaching experience on the campus or in nearby public schools. Op- 
portixnities to observe teaching, participate in work with children, teach in 
the kindergarten-primary, elementary, or junior high schools, and engage 
in all other activities for which regularly employed teachers are responsible. 

Individual and group conferences with teachers and supervisors. 



53 



COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

360 THE CHILD AND HIS CURRICULUM 

10 hours per week. {Credit 10 hours) 

Planned and directed experiences to help the student see the school 
in relation to the community, providing a background for planning with 
children and for evolving a program with them. The principles of teaching 
and learning are developed through activities in the following areas: 

361 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Vart of 10 hour course.) 

Furnishes the student with a background of information and tech- 
niques upon which he may draw in assisting pupils to interpret trends in 
modern life. Locating, organizing, synthesizing, and interpreting funda- 
mental social information. (Listed for 3 credits as Education 52 J in the 
summer session bulletin.) 

362 SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 10 hour course.) 

The significance of science for the elementary school child and its 
contribution toward his development. Criteria for selecting science ex- 
periences for children for curriculum construction, and evaluating their 
results. (Listed for 3 credits as Education 524 in the summer session 
bulletin. ) 

363 ARITHMETIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of 10 hour course.) 

The kinds of arithmetic; the nature of meaning in arithmetic; 
core mathematical ideas running through elementary mathematics; re- 
search findings in teaching of arithmetic; organization of units of instruc- 
tion; evaluation of pupil progress. Offered as Education 223 for 3 credit 
hours in the summer session.) 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 204. 

364 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours — Part of 10 hour course.) 

A study of the language needs and abilities of children. Ways of devel- 
oping children's abilities to use language more effectively in reading, writ- 
ing, speaking, and listening are evaluated. Emphasis is placed upon reading 
instruction. (Listed as Education 521 in the summer session bulletin.) 

369 THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 
1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour — Part of 10 hour course.) 

The values and needs of our society, the developmental tendencies 
and tasks of children, the organization and sequence of school activities. 



54 



371 ART AND THE CHILD 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The major considerations of art education appropriate to the elemen- 
tary school. Experiences in planning and teaching art. Work in classroom 
and workshop. Discussion and demonstrations. (A similar course for 2 or 
3 credits, Art in the Elementary School, is listed as Education 534 or J 38 
in the summer session bulletin.) 

372 MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Acquaints the student with music programs in the elementary school. 
Skills developed to carry on singing, listening, instrumental, rhythmic and 
creative experiences with children. Observation and practice. One hour 
per week class discussion and two hours laboratory. (Listed for 2 or 3 
credits as Education 5 37 or 5 39 in the summer session bulletin.) 

373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Observation and participation at the Lida Lee Tall School. One hour 
devoted to planning and preparation and one to practice. (Required for 
students in elementary education. Open to other students as an elective.) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

374 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Practice in activities suitable for use in teaching. (Required for stu- 
dents in elementary education. Open to other students as an elective.) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The aims and outcomes of the physical education program, and the 
selection and use of materials which contribute to the accomplishment of 
the objectives. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

430 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL — ADVANCED 
COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work in music in the elementary school. Examination 
of courses of study in use. Evaluation of materials and procedures current 
in school music teaching. Consideration of music activities in their relation 



J5 



to an integrated program. Creative work. 

Participation in planning and carrying out of musical projects in the 
Lida Lee Tall School. 

Prerequisite: Music 103, 203. 

303 and 404 DIRECTED TEACHING 
(Credit 15 hours.) 

Course described on page 53. 

508 SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Modern courses of study, new textbooks, and recent research devoted 
to arithmetic instruction in the elementary school. Analysis of new topics 
and new techniques. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204 or consent of the instructor. 

509 — Seminar in Elementary School Science 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Special consideration will be given to the development and evaluation 
of science programs, and to identifying newer trends in elementary science 
education. A seminar paper, a series of specially designed experiences, or a 
research project will be required of each student. Prerequisite: The Towson 
undergraduate requirements in science or written consent of the instructor. 

COURSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
EDUCATION 

The program of education for junior high school teachers is designed 
to bring about a closer integration between methods courses and the practi- 
cal experiences of observation and student teaching. All students receive 
methods instruction and study the junior high school child while engaged 
in a program of active participation in typical teaching situations. 

250 FIELD STUDIES ON THE ADOLESCENT AND HIS COM- 
MUNITY 
1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

A study of community agencies serving the needs of youth. Individual 
projects provide study and work with people of junior high school age. 

3 59 INTRODUCTION TO THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

The purpose of education, curriculum development and organization, 
nature of the junior high school program and educational experiences, 
group planning and work, and principles of teaching and learning. 



56 



3 52 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The oral and written communication of ideas in the junior high 
school. Reading, composition, penmanship, spelling, library usage, and 
work-study skills. 

35 3 THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The selection of appropriate content, method, and evaluation tech- 
niques, and the analysis of textbooks and resource materials. Demonstration 
teaching methods are developed and practiced. 

3 54 THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE JUNIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per tveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Current curriculum trends. Materials, methods and activities and 
their organization for classroom use. The special methods applicable to 
the teaching of history, geography and citizenship, as well as integration, 
correlation and the core program. 

35 5 MEASUREMENT IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Problems in measurement; principles underlying choice of test in- 
struments; survey of test literature; administering, scoring, and recording 
test data; interpretation of test norms; construction of informal tests. 

3 56 THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 

SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The teaching in the junior high school of written and spoken ex- 
pression in the light of experimental findings and modern practice. 

3 57 THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE JUNIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The aims and purposes of mathematics instruction. An examination 
of courses of study and text books in mathematics for the junior high 
school, presenting some of the scientific techniques of instruction in 
mathematics. 

375 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE JUNIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Methods of teaching sports, track and field stunts, combatives, 
rhythms, relays, and mass games. 



57 



379 GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Group readings and discussions of the scope and function of a 
guidance program; the role of the guidance speciaUst; the function and 
purpose of the counseUng interviews ; the kinds and uses of guidance forms, 
reports, and records; vocational and educational guidance. 

402 JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in junior high school 
books apart from school textbooks, aid the student to obtain a better 
x\^orking knowledge of this literature, and increase his awareness of degrees 
of excellence in content and form. 

415 AUDIO- VISUAL WORKSHOP 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

Practical experience in the operation of audio- visual apparatus, in 
preparation of teaching aids and in the application of modern tools of 
learning in the classroom. Field trips, still pictures, filmstrips, motion 
pictures, graphic devices, records, radio and television. 

Required of and open only to students majoring in junior high school 
education. 

451 CORE TECHNIQUES IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 liours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Designed to help prospective core teachers develop understandings 
of the philosophy, organization, content, and methods of core and to 
build skills necessary in various types of core programs. 

452 WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Planning, participating in, and evaluating junior high school activities 
that utilize art, music, and drama skills which may be employed to meet the 
needs of individual pupils, vitalize group learnings, clarify concepts, and 
build appreciations. 

303 and 304 DIRECTED TEACHING 
{Credit 15 hours.) 

Course description on page 53. 

GENERAL COURSES IN EDUCATION 

103 ORIENTATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS 



Si 



1 hour per week for one semester {No credit) 

Similar to the second semester of Orientation 101-102 and required 
of all students transferring from the junior college or other colleges who 
have not had such a course. Includes visits to elementary and junior high 
schools, reviews of movies and film strips, and discussions led by representa- 
tives of kindergarten-primary, elementary, and junior high programs. 

3 1 5 AUDIO- VISUAL MATERIALS AND METHODS OF INSTRUC- 
TION 
3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Methods for vitalizing learning through the use of pictures, school 
trips, motion pictures, radio, television, records and transcriptions. The 
location of materials, operation of apparatus, preparation of pupil- and 
teacher-made tools of learning and presentation of concrete materials. 

331 HISTORY OF EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Assists the student in the organization, interpretation, and evaluation 
of his professional experiences in the light of the origin and development of 
organized education. 

401 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Children's books apart from school textbooks are examined to provide 
a better working knowledge of this literature, and to increase awareness 
of degrees of excellence in content and form. 
For undergraduate credit only. 

405 FIELD STUDIES ON THE CHILD AND HIS COMMUNITY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The structure and functions of social agencies and their reationships 
to school practices and theories of child sociahzation. Planning and work- 
ing with groups of children in approved social agencies or making intensive 
studies of recreational and non-recreational social agencies, depending on 
the student's background. Class discussions and field trips. 

426 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN THE TEACHING OF 

READING 
2 hours per tveek. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Current principles, methods and materials essential to the organiza- 
tion and administration of a functional reading program. Emphasis on 
trends in individualized reading. Graduate students must take this course 
for three credits. 

Prerequisite: Student teaching or other teaching experience. 



59 



426a Same AS 426. 2 hours per iveek. {Credit }> hours.) See page 47. 

461 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF 

EDUCATION 
1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

A workshop to help solve the professional problems of the teacher 
facing his first job. 

307-310 INTEGRATED PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCA- 
TION 

{Credit 8 hours.) 

An overview of the elementary school curriculum, with emphasis 
upon the language arts, social living, and related activities in other areas. 
Acquaints students with classroom routines and procedures. Daily obser- 
vation of experienced teachers working and planning with groups of 
children at different grade levels. Specialists discuss and demonstrate 
activities, materials, and procedures in music, art and physical education. 
(Summer Session only.) 

325 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

{Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of the processes of human growth, development, learning 
and behavior, with impHcations for planning group experiences and activi- 
ties and meeting the needs of individual children. (Summer Session only.) 

326 PURPOSES AND PRACTICES IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

{Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of the purposes of the elementary school programs, the areas 
of growth for which the school is responsible and modern practices for 
realizing the goals of the educational program. (Summer Session only.) 

ENGLISH (6) 

Mr. Bevins (Chairman), Mr. Brewington, Mrs. Brewington, 
Miss Crabtree, Mr. Guess, Mrs. Hedges, Miss Henry, Miss Hughes, 
Mr. Kramer, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Page, Mrs. Sargent, Mrs. Sawyer, Mr. 
Somers, Miss Thearle, Mr. Wright. 

The Enghsh program provides the student with experiences in the 
appreciation of Hterature, present and past, and affords opportunities for 
self-expression in written and spoken forms. 

Fourteen semester hours of credit in English are required of teachers 
college students. The required courses are: 102-103 Composition and 
Introduction to Literature, 122 Fundamentals of Speech, 204 English Lit- 
erature, and one course selected from these: 205 English Literature, 307 
American Literature, 308 American Literature. 



60 



AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN ENGLISH 

EMPHASIS IN LITERATURE 

The specific purposes of English as an area if concentration with an 
emphasis in hterature are to give comprehensive introductions to the fields 
of English and American literature, presenting literature in historical per- 
spective and acquainting the student with major works and writers of the 
English language; to give as electives advanced courses in limited areas, 
allowing the student to concentrate in the study of particular literary 
figures, types, and ideas; and to discover the resources and practice the 
methods of research. 

The following courses are required for this concentration: 102-103 
Composition and Introduction to Literature; 122 Fundamentals of Speech; 
204, 205 English Literature; 307, 308 American Literature. The emphasis 
in literature is completed by the selection of eight hours from literature 
courses in the department. 

Students in the kindergarten-primary division who expect to con- 
centrate in English will select Program B in the sophomore year and will 
take English 204 in place of the three-hour elective in Semester 1. Students 
in the elementary division who expect to concentrate in English will select 
Program A in the sophomore year. For the meaning of these programs, 
see the curriculum sequences described on pages 38-43. 

EMPHASIS IN SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 

The specific purposes of English as an area of concentration with an 
emphasis in speech and dramatics are to train and develop the student in 
the skills of oral communication and dramatic arts; to develop an appre- 
ciation for the aesthetic values in the art and literature of oral perfor- 
mance; and to develop a critical ability in evaluation of the speech arts. 

In addition to the fourteen hours of English and Speech required of 
all students, those completing an emphasis in this field must take 327 
Voice and Phonetics and 375 Play Directing. Five or six hours must be 
selected from the following: 218 Public Speaking; 223 Speech and the 
Classroom Teacher; 374 Acting; 304 Oral Reading and Interpretation; 
377 Stagecraft; 378 Stage Make-up. Two or three credit hours must be 
selected from other courses in the department. (315 Shakespeare; 316 
Shakespeare; 321 Contemporary Drama; 324 Development of the English 
Drama are recommended.) 

LITERATURE 

-102-103 COMPOSITION AND INTRODUCTION TO LITERA- 
TURE 

3 hours pet week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A review of grammar, the writing of compositions, and reading of 
various forms of literature. A research paper required in the second semes- 
ter. Students needing additional help in English may be placed in small 
sections meeting five instead of three hours a week. 



61 



English 102-103 is prerequisite to all other courses in composition 
and literature in the department. 

"If a student has a superior record on his entrance examination and 
if he is recommended by the EngHsh Department as a candidate for exemp- 
tion from English 102 or 103, he may request an examination to exempt 
him from that course. The student will not receive credit for the course 
but will be allowed to take another English course to make up for the ex- 
empted hours. 

204 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work of major writers in EngUsh literature from 
Chaucer through Blake. 

205 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the work of major writers in English Hterature from 
Wordsworth through T. S. Eliot. 

224 THE SHORT STORY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The development of the short story, with attention to changing 
forms, techniques, and subject matter. 

225 AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A critical reading from the literary point of view of important 
American biographies and autobiographies. 

231 ADVANCED EXPOSITION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Practice in such types of expository writing as definition, process, 
analysis, the documentary, criticism and review, and research. 

232 ADVANCED GRAMMAR 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

English grammar, usage and sentence structure on an advanced level. 

233 ELEMENTS OF POETRY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Versification (meter, rhyme, rhythm, diction and figurative lan- 
guage) and the forms and purposes of poetry. 

307 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



62 



A survey of the major writers In American literature from the 
Colonial Period to Walt Whitman. 

308 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the major writers in American literature from Walt 
Whitman to the present. 

3 1 5 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Shakespeare's development as a poet and a dramatist during the period 
of the comedies and historical plays. 

316 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A detailed study of the great tragedies and the late romantic comedies. 

319 CONTEMPORARY POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A study of the work of important twentieth century poets. 

320 CONTEMPORARY NOVEL 

3 hojirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A study of the work of important twentieth century novelists. 

321 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The critical reading of plays of the late nineteenth century and the 
twentieth century. 

323 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN NOVEL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The history and development of the American novel from the begin- 
ning to 1900. 

324 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The history and development of English drama from the Middle Ages 
to the nineteenth century. 

326 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Greek and Roman mythology. Some attention to the use of mythology 
in English and American literature. 



63 



328 HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 
3 hojirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The chief books of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha studied 
from a hterary and historic point of view. Not a course in theology. 

333 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

European writings in translation from the time of Homer to the 
Renaissance. 

334 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hotirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

European writings in translation from the Renaissance to 1900. 

3 83 IMAGINATIVE WRITING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The art of imaginative expression. The writing of articles and short 
stories and the other creative forms. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

3 84 NEWSPAPER WRITING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Techniques of writing for the newspaper. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

405 HISTORY OF CRITICISM 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

The history and principles of literary criticism. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The history and development of the EngUsh Novel from the begin- 
nings to 1900. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of literature beyond the freshman year. 

430 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The changes and reasons for the changes in grammar, sound, and 
vocabulary of the language, from Old English to modern times. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of literature beyond the freshman year. 



64 



SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 

100 CORRECTIVE SPEECH 

2 hours per week. (No college credit.) 

A course that must be passed by teachers college students who have 
defective speech. Must be taken before student teaching is begun. 

==122 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The sound of spoken language, the principles and practice of public 
speaking, and the art of oral reading. 

* If a student demonstrates in a performance test the ability to do the 
work of English 122, he will be permitted to take advanced work in speech 
or an elective in any other field. 

218 PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The theory of public address and practice in speaking to a classroom 
audience. Selection and organization of subject, language, bodily action, 
pronunciation, and voice. 

Prerequisite: 122. 

300 SPEECH CORRECTION AND THE CLASSROOM TEACHER 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The educational principles that govern attitudes toward exceptional 
children in general, and speech and hearing handicapped children in 
particular. 

Each student spends one hour per week in the College Speech and 
Hearing Clinic for Children. 

304 ORAL READING AND INTERPRETATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

General principles of oral reading, and the art of interpretation in 
poetry, drama, and the short story. 

Prerequisite: 122 and consent of the instructor. 

327 VOICE AND PHONETICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

An advanced course in the study of voice production and phonetics. 
Individual practice and drill in speech sounds and acceptable spoken 
language. Electrical recordings of voice and speech. 

Prerequisite: 122. 



65 



374 ACTING 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The theory and practice of acting. Constant practice in the analysis 
of characters, the creation of roles, and the rehearsal of short scenes. Im- 
provisations. 

375 PLAY DIRECTING 

5 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The theory and practice of play directing. Analysis of plays for 
production, play casting, and the process of rehearsal. Each student makes 
a director's study of some specific play and has opportunities for practice. 

376 TECHNIQUES OF MAKE-UP FOR DRAMATIC PRODUC- 
TIONS 

1 hour per week. (Credit 1 hour.) Second Semester. 

Principles and practices of stage make-up. Approximate supply cost 
$4.00. 

377 STAGECRAFT 

2 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Visual elements of play production, including the theory of stage de- 
sign, construction of scenery, costuming, stage effects and lighting. (The 
third hour will be earned by 20 hours' work on college productions.) 

379 ELEMENTS OF CHILDREN'S THEATER 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A course concerned with the elements required to effectively stage 
plays with children and for children through the junior high level. 

Each student will be required to devote time for rehearsals with the 
children. 

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY 
GRADES 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 342. Course description on page 52. 

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 364. Course description on page 54. 

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 352. Course description on page 57. 



66 



ENGLISH IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
4 hours per week for 9 weeks. 

Credited as Education 3 56. Course description on page 57. 

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 401. Course description on page 59. 

JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 402. Course description on page 58. 

HEALTH EDUCATION (8) 

Miss Bize (Chairman), Miss Gilcoyne, Mr. Reitenbach, Miss 
Ward. 

The Health Education courses deal with the basic needs of the human 
organism for healthy growth and development. The courses stress not 
only the responsibility of the individual for maintaining his own health 
and contributing to that of others, but also the function of the teacher in 
influencing and guiding pupils in healthy living. 

105 PERSONAL HYGIENE 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Introduction to personal health with emphasis on health problems of 
the college freshman. 

305 CURRENT HEALTH PROBLEMS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Individual and community health problems and practices ; elements of 
anatomy and physiology as a basis for understanding. 

310 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN PUBLIC HEALTH 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the principles and practices in the field of public health, 
and the organization and administration of various agencies. Major public 
health problems considered. 

320 ADVANCED FIRST AID 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

The mechanism of shock, artificial respiration, traction splinting, 
splinting of fractures of lower extremities, transportation of injured, 
treatment of common medical emergencies. American Red Cross advance 



67 



certificate awarded upon successful completion of course. (For a Red 
Cross instructor's certificate, 19 class meetings are required.) 
Prerequisite: 305 or Standard First Aid Certificate. 

405 SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Materials for the teaching of health, the place of health in the school 
program and coordination of the work of teachers and school health 
services. Techniques for encouraging desirable health habits and for ob- 
serving the health of the child in the classroom. 

Prerequisite: 105 and 305. Open only to juniors and seniors. 



MATHEMATICS (11) 

Miss Archer, Mr. Beckey, Mr. Volpel (Chairman), Miss Zn?p. 

The mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for students to 
deepen and strengthen their understanding of the basic concepts of mathe- 
matics, explore the areas where mathematics is essential in everyday living, 
develop an appreciation of the role mathematics has played in the develop- 
ment of our civiHzation, and profit from the discipline it develops. 

Mathematics 204, Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic, is required 
of all teachers college students and should be taken in the sophomore year. 
Junior college students planning to transfer to other institutions should not 
elect this course. 



AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN MATHEMATICS 

Students desiring an area of concentration in mathematics are re- 
quired to take 1 5 credit hours of work in addition to the required covirse 
204. A concentration in mathematics must include the following courses: 
211 College Algebra, 212 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry, 313 and 
314 Calculus, and 431 Concepts in Modern Mathematics. 

Students in the kindergarten-primary, and elementary divisions pre- 
ferring a concentration in mathematics will need to defer American 
History to the junior year or obtain permission to carry 18 hours in the 
sophomore year. 



68 



105 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Basic problems of business. Mechanics of computation and fundamen- 
tals of problem solving and topics involving taxes, wages, interest, dis- 
count, business ownership, retailing, insurance, and securities. 

106 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Compound interest and discount, amortization, sinking funds, valua- 
tion of bonds, depreciation, annuities, and elements of insurance. 
Prerequisite: 10 J, or consent of the instructor. 

110 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

For students with inadequate background in algebra. A thorough 
treatment of the elementary topics through quadratic equations. 

204 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ARITHMETIC 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A mature treatment of the basic concepts of arithmetic. Origins of 
number, structure of a positional number system, principles underlying 
the fundamental operations, and computation with approximate numbers. 

Junior college students planning to transfer credits to other colleges 
should not elect this course. 

210 BASIC STATISTICS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Analysis and interpretation of data, measures of central tendency 
and variability, rank and correlations. 

211 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

A review and extension of basic algebraic principles, concepts, and 
skills. Includes logarithms, theory of equations, variation, progressions, 
complex number, probability, and determinants. 

Prerequisite: 110, or two years of high school algebra or consent of 
the instructor. 



69 



212 TRIGONOMETRY AND ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

Topics in trigonometry and triangulation, identities, polar coordinated 
and trigonometric equations; topics in analytic geometry are the straight 
line, conies, transformation of coordinates, and higher plane curves. 

Prerequisite: 111, or consent of the instructor. 

313,314 CALCULUS, DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

First semester: functions and Hmits, differentiation of algebraic func- 
tions, indefinite and definite integrals, and applications. 

Second semester: differentiation of transcendental functions, inte- 
gration, Taylor's formula, and applications. 

Prerequisite: 111-113, or consent of instructor. 

ARITHMETIC IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY GRADES 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 343. Course description on page 53. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 204. 

ARITHMETIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
2 hoiirs per week. 

Credited as Education 363. Course description on page 54. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 204. 

THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 3 57. Course description on page 57. 

SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 508. Course description on page 56. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204 or consent of the instructor. 

MODERN LANGUAGES (12) 
Miss Tansil, Mr. Von Schwerdtner (Chairman). 

Teachers college students may register for any course for which they 
are qualified. Junior college students should fulfil their language require- 
ments for eventual transfer. 



70 



121-122 FRENCH ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

221-222 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; translation 
of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the ability 
of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: French 121 and 122 or equivalent. 

111-112 GERMAN ELEMENTS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

211-212 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; transla- 
tion of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the 
ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: German 111 and 112 or equivalent. 

101-102 SPANISH ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation and 
elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

201-202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; translation 
of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate with the ability 
of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 and 102 or equivalent. 

ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES 

According to demand, the following courses on the advanced level 
ma)'^ be given: French 321, German 311, and Spanish 301 — Novel and 
Short Story; French 322, German 312, and Spanish 302 — Drama and 
Poetry; French 323, German 313, and Spanish 303 — History of Liter- 
ature with collateral reading of the French, German, or Spanish classical 
authors, in the original. 



71 



Each course 3 hours per week for 1 semester. {Credit 3 hours.) 

French 324, German 314, and Spanish 304 — Advanced Conversa- 
tion. 

2 hours per week for 1 semester. (Credit 2 hours.) 

French 325, German 315, and Spanish 305 — Advanced Composition. 
1 hour per week for 1 semester. {Credit 1 hour.) 

MUSIC (13) 

Mr. Bollinger, Mrs. Coulange, Mr. Duro (Chairman), Miss 
MacDonald, Mr. Haslup, Miss Weyforth. 

The music program aims to acquaint students with music, as con- 
sumers, through hearing it and reading about it; and as producers, through 
singing and playing. Through music, students have opportunities for self- 
expression in a social medium. It will be their privilege as teachers to bring 
similar opportunities to children. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN MUSIC 

The purposes of an area of concentration in music are to give com- 
prehensive introductions to both general music subjects and skill subjects; 
to afford an opportunity for self-expression, an acquaintance with the his- 
torical development of music, and the opportunity to investigate specific 
areas of music. 

The following courses are required for this concentration: Music 
Appreciation 103, Music Fundamentals 203, Education 346 (Experiences 
with Young Children) or Education 372 (Music in the Elementary 
School), and either Glee Club 209-10, Orchestra 215-16, or Men's Chorus 
217-18. 

Six or 7 credits must be taken from the following electives: 2 credit 
hours from either Instrumental Class and Ensemble 308 or Ensemble Sing- 
ing, Sight, Sight and Conducting 311,2 credit hours from either Creative 
Music 305 or Harmony and Ear Training 306, 2 or 3 credit hours from 
Twentieth Century Music 307, American Music 313, or History of Music 
315. 

The remaining 7 or 8 credit hours necessary to complete the 14 re- 
quired for the concentration may be selected from courses in the foregoing 
paragraph and the following: Class Piano 314, Music in the Elementary 
School 430. 

103 MUSIC APPRECIATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The elements of music (rhythm, melody, and harmony) together with 
tone color and form and their significance. Folk and art songs, opera, 
symphony, and tone poems. One hour per week class discussion and two 
hours of experience with music through phonograph records, movies, con- 
certs, radio and television. 



72 



203 MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Understanding music and its elements through singing, playing of 
various instruments, and rhythmic expression. Students grouped according 
to their musical abiKties and individual differences. One hour per week 
class instruction and two hours of individual and group activities. 

212-213 WOMEN'S CHORUS 

1 Yz hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for two consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of choral literature written and arranged 
for female voices. 

217-218 MEN'S CHORUS 

1 Yz hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for two consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of choral literature written and arranged 
for male vocies. 

305 CREATIVE MUSIC 

2 hours per \veek. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A basic course in composing and arranging for choral assemblies and 
instrumental combinations. 

Prerequisite: Harmony 306. 

306 HARMONY AND EAR TRAINING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Melody writing for instruments and voice, with and without accom- 
paniment. Musicianship is developed through keyboard harmony and 
melodic dictation. 

307 TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC 

2 hours per iveek. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A survey of the music of outstanding composers in the twentieth 
century. 

308 INSTRUMENTAL CLASS AND ENSEMBLE 

3 hours per tt^eek. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Class instruction in orchestral instruments on the elementary, inter- 
mediate, and advanced levels. 

3 1 1 ENSEMBLE SINGING, SIGHT SINGING, AND CONDUCTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Group instruction in voice and song interpretation. Ear training and 
sight reading of unison and part songs. Individual and group performance. 
Conducting. Participation in the Glee Club is expected. 



73 



313 AMERICAN MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A survey of types of American music from the Colonial period to the 
present with discussion of derivative and original sources. 

314 CLASS PIANO 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Class instruction in piano playing, designed to encourage participation 
in musical activity for personal expression. 

Five hours per week out-of -class preparation required. 

Open to beginning students and students with less than one year's 
piano instruction. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

3 15 HISTORY OF MUSIC 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

An historical study of the development of music in the western world. 

209-210 GLEE CLUB 

lYz hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for 2 consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of orchestra literature. A maximum of 3 
points credit may be earned in Glee Club and/or Orchestra. (See Musical 
Organizations, page 26, for extra-curricular aspects of this work.) 

215-216 ORCHESTRA 

lYz hours per week. {Credit 1 hour for 2 consecutive semesters.) 

Study and performance of orchestra literature. A maximum of 3 
points credit may be earned in Glee Club and/or Orchestra. (See Musical 
Organizations, page 27, for extra-curricular aspects of this work.) 

MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 372. Course description on page 55. 

MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL— ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 430. Course description on page 5 5. 

COURSES AT THE PEABODY 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Qualified students may take as many as 14 elective credit hours, for 
the most part in applied music, at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. 
Approval must be obtained, first, through the Chairman of the State 
Teachers College Music Department, and second, through the Dean of the 
Peabody Conservatory, and a receipt of payment for the Peabody course 
presented when registering at State Teachers College. 



74 



PHYSICAL. EDUCATION (16) 

Miss Bize (Chairman), Mrs. Bleul, Miss Daniels, Miss Gil- 
coYNE, Miss Jenkins, Mr. Killian, Mr. Melville, Mr. Minnegan, 
Miss Roach. 

The physical education program provides or the development of 
skills and understandings for satisfying participation in sports and in- 
formed spectatorship, and development of interest in active outdoor 
recreation. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION — First semester: 101, 201. Second Semester: 
102, 202. 

2 hours per week. {Credit 4 hours.) 

An introduction to physical education activities to provide the stu- 
dent a foundation for using them intelligently and for a systematic ap- 
proach to other and more advanced activities, while helping the student to 
develop and maintain physical fitness and ability in the fundamental skills. 

INDIVIDUAL GYMNASTICS 

Work in individual gymnastics for all students. Individual and group 
conferences. The work continties until the student shows progress in 
understanding and demonstration of good posture. This is part of the 
course 101-102. 

510 RECREATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Preparation for leadership and organization of after-school activities 
for children, such as club, hiking, camping and playground activities. 
Visits to recreation centers. Specialists in story telling, crafts, recreational 
singing, playground, and club work give part of the course. Participation 
in some organized recreation with children. 

373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 
Course description on page 5 5. 

374 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Course description on page 55. 

375 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

An elective in basic physical education activities. Methods of teaching 
sports, track and field, stunts, combatives, rhythms, relays, and mass games. 



75 



410 RHYTHMS AND DANCING 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Preparation for teaching rhythms and dancing. Analysis of funda- 
mental dance rhythm, creation of simple dance patterns, singing games 
and types of accompaniment, selection of appropriate material for various 
age levels, preparation of dance material for festival and holiday programs, 
and recreational dancing. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The aims of the physical education program, appropriate outcomes for 
different age levels and the selection and use of materials that contribute 
to the accomplishment of these objectives. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202. 

PSYCHOLOGY (20) 

Mr. Bing, Miss Clarke (Coordinator) , Mr. Mann, Mr. Moser, 
Mr. Neulander, Mr. "Wilson. 

Society requires of teachers that they exercise sympathetic under- 
standing, wise guidance, and intelligent direction of the growing child to 
the end that he may become a well-adjusted personality. Psychology pro- 
motes growth in the understanding, prediction, and control of human be- 
havior. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The purpose of the area of concentration in psychology is to pro- 
vide a planned selection of elective courses beyond the psychology require- 
ment of six semester hours. Students may select an area of concentration 
for the following reasons: 

1 . In order to become more eflfective teachers. 

2. In order to prepare for teaching in the fields of special education. 

3. In order to prepare for further study at the graduate level in the 
behavioral sciences. 

4. In order to further their general education in the behavioral 
sciences at the undergraduate level. 

Required courses are 202, 205, 206, or 307. The area of concentration 
will be completed by the selection of 11 or 12 elective hours in psychology. 

201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The problems, methods, facts and principles of psychology. General 
principles of psychological development; learning, remembering and 
thinking; motivation of behavior; perception; feeling and emotion; 



76 



measurement of individual differences. Open to junior college students 
only. 

202 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 
4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Research methodology and simple experimentation illustrating the 
subject matter of general psychology and human growth and development 
and the use of the experimental method. Demonstrations and experiments 
in learning, sensory experience, feeling and emotion, individual differences, 
measurement of personality traits. 

Prerequisite: For Junior College students, 20 L For Teachers' College 
students planning to take a concentration in psychology, 205 and 206 
(307). Psychology 202 may be taken concurrently with Psychology 206 
(307). 

205 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Principles, facts and methods of psychology useful in explaining 
human behavior and experience. The developmental aspects of growth 
and behavior as they pertain to children and adolescents. Observation, 
the writing and interpretation of records, and special readings. 

206 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY II 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The emotional development and motivational processes from childhood 
through adulthood. The impact of cultural and societal demands upon the 
growing child and his methods of meeting these demands. Observation and 
interpretation of child behavior and personality development. 

Prerequisite: 205. 

307 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Physical, emotional, intellectual development during adolescence; 
social development and heterosexuality; adolescent personality; problems 
of adjustment; juvenile delinquency; guidance of adolescents. 

308 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Learning as adjustment; forms of learning; experimental data con- 
cerning the fundamental nature and conditions of learning. Teaching and 
learning; procedures helpful for improving learning efficiency; transfer 
of training. 

322 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The structure and function of groups. Recent advances in sociology, 



77 



anthropology, clinical psychology and psychiatry. 
Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 

323 PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The mental equipment of individual children. Degrees of retardation 
and their causes, disorders of behavior which frequently are concomitant, 
and the psychological bases of a suitable curriculum for mentally retarded 
children. The causes and consequences of emotional disturbance in children, 
and the special needs of children with serious emotional problems. Charac- 
teristics and needs of the gifted child, special problems in development, 
motivation, and learning, and their impHcations for educational provisions. 

402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Educational and psychological testing and evaluation. The construc- 
tion, administration, interpretation and use of the various evaluative de- 
vices of achievement, aptitude, intelligence, interests and personality. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 

403 MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 

2 hours per tveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

General nature of motivation; theories of emotion; motivation and 
emotion in the structure of personality; social impHcations. 
Prerequisite: 205-206 (205-307) 

403a Same as 403. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

404 PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of individual differences in human traits and characteristics, 
methodology, basic principles, and major findings in research. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-307), 2 02, and a course in Statistics or 
Measurement and Evaluation. Permission of the instructor. 

405 PERSONALITY, ITS ANALYSIS, DEVELOPMENT, AND 
EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Theoretical approaches to the study of personality, including behav- 
iorism, typologies, semantics, need theory, psychoanalysis. Facts and theor- 
ies of sensation, and perception. Methods of personahty evaluation, includ- 
ing practice in personality assessment and analysis. 

Prerequisite: 205-206 (205-307). 



78 



420 MENTAL HYGIENE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The functions and processes of adjustment related to mental health, 
main problems of hfe to which adjustment is made, and the nature of con- 
flict. Guest lecturers, movies, and field trips. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 205. 

502 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Principal theoretical systems, with emphasis on modern schools of be- 
haviorism, gestalt, psychoanalysis, perception, structurahsm, functionalism 
and purposive psychology. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-307) or the equivalent. 

502a Same as 502 {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

503 SEMINAR IN SELECTED PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per xveek. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Investigation of selected problems from various fields of psychology 
that are of current educational significance. Students with special interests 
will have the opportunity to choose problems with psychological implica- 
tions. 

Prerequisites: 205-206 (205-307) or the equivalent. 

SCIENCE (17) 

Mr. Bareham, Mr. Belden, Mr. Cox, Mr. Crook, Mr. Erickson, 
Mr. Hathaway, Mr. Moorfield, Mr. Muma, Miss Odell, Mr. Pelham 
(Chairman), Mr. Rubendall, Mr. Stringer, Mr. Yarbrough. 

The curriculum in science helps students to understand their natural 
environment and the scientific phenomena which are part of their every- 
day lives, and to become aware of the nature of the scientific enterprise. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN SCIENCE 

CONCENTRATION I 

This concentration is for students desiring to teach science in the 
junior high school and for others desiring more intensive preparation in 
science. The following courses are required: 101-102 Biological Science, 
206-207 General Chemistry, 211-212 General Physics. Students must 
elect science courses totaling four to six credit hours to complete this 
concentration. 

Students selecting this concentration are excused from the general 
requirement of 202-203 Physical Science. 

CONCENTRATION II 

This concentration is for students with a general interest in science. 



79 



Courses required for this concentration are: 101-102 Biological Science, 
202-203 Physical Science. To complete the concentration students must 
elect, with the advice of members of the department, fourteen credit hours 
in science courses. 

The biology course should be taken first in each concentration. The 
sequence for physics and chemistry in Concentration I should be deter- 
mined in consultation with the adviser in the department. 

Students in the kindergarten-primary or elementary divisions choosing 
Concentration I in science will need to defer American History to the 
junior year or obtain permission to carry 18 hours in the sophomore year. 

101-102 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

First semester: general characteristics of living things, a survey of 
the animal kingdom, Hfe histories of representative animals, and a compar- 
ison of the morphology and physiology of frog and human organ systems. 

Second semester: embryology, genetics, a survey of important plant 
phyla and life histories, modern interpretations of organic evolution, and 
principles of ecology and conservation. 

104-105 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES 

6 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 8 hours.) 

First semester: general characteristics of living things, physiology 
and anatomy of vertebrate systems as represented by the frog and man, 
parallel study of human nutrition and embryology, and a survey of the 
animal kingdom based on its evolutionary significance. 

Second semester: genetics, modern interpretations of organic evolu- 
tion, and a survey of important plant phyla. Two hours of lecture and four 
of laboratory. 

202-203 PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

The general procedures and characteristics of modern physical science. 
In the first semester a definition and examination of energy, and a brief 
treatment of historical geology; in the second, a consideration of modern 
physics and astronomy. 

206-207 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

Principles and theories of modern chemistry. Chemical laws, physical 
constants, theories of solutions, ionization, valency, and structure of mat- 
ter. An experimental and problem approach. Two one-hour lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods. 

208 BRIEF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

A study of carbon compounds, their nomenclature and reactions. 



80 



Relationships of these reactions to everyday life. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 206, or consent of the instructor. 

211-212 GENERAL PHYSICS 

6 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 8 hours.) 1961-62. 

For junior college students, students concentrating in junior high 
school science teaching, and students desiring further background in 
science. Includes mechanics, heat, sound, Hght, electricity, magnetism, and 
an introduction to nuclear physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: Registration in Mathematics 1 1 1 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

302 BOTANY 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

The basic concepts of plant taxonomy, physiology, and ecology 
through laboratory and field experiences coupled with discussions and 
lectures. Emphasis on plants most common to the local environment 
and techniques most useful to an understanding and enjoyment of them. 
Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

303 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

4 hows per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Sequester 1960-61, 

Study of fresh, brackish, and salt water species of major phyla from 
the Protozoa through the Arthropoda (except the insects) with special 
emphasis on local forms. Economic, ecological, and taxonomic considera- 
tions. Field trips for collections. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

304 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

A comparative study of vertebrate animals, their structure, natural 
history, and relationships, by means of dissections, lectures, and discus- 
sions. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

310 FIELD NATURAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Life in its various forms, in various environments and the relation- 
ship of these forms to one another and to man. Lectures, discussions, labor- 
atory work, and field observations. 



81 



310a 4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

312 INTRODUCTORY AVIATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

Basic principles of flight theory and control, aircraft and engine 
construction, navigation, weather information processing, air traffic con- 
trol, and C. A. A. regulations. Military, political, and economic implica- 
tions of aviation. Field trips, laboratory work, and Link Trainer instruction 
optional and subject to the instructor's approval. 

3 1 2a 2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

Field trips, laboratory work, and Link Trainer instruction required. 

314 ORNITHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

A laboratory and field course in bird identification, structure, behav- 
ior, ecology, and general economic relationships. Emphasis on the birds 
of the Baltimore area. Migration and individual bird movements at the 
U. S. Government approved Banding Station established on the campus. 
One one-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. 

314a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

315 ENTOMOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A laboratory and field course in the study of insects. Recognition of 
the more common orders, and a study of their structure, behavior, ecology, 
economic importance, and control. 

315a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

318 MICROBIOLOGY 

4 hours per week {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

For prospective teachers and junior college students expecting to 
major in some phase of the biological sciences. Principally a laboratory 
course investigating such groups or organisms as bacteria, protozoa, and 
lower plant forms. 

Prerequisite: 101-102 or 104-105. 

320 GENERAL ASTRONOMY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

The present knowledge of the earth, moon, sun, planets, comets, 
meteors, stars and galaxies, and the methods by which this knowledge has 
been attained. Lecture. 

320a 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 
Lecture and problems. 



82 



324 GEOMORPHOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Land forms, their origin and the processes whereby they are modified. 
Field work in the local community. Two one-hour lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103. 

392 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

A laboratory and field course conducted by the conservation staff of 
the Maryland Department of Research and Education under the direction 
of the Science Department, providing information on such natural resour- 
ces as water, soil, forests, game, and fisheries. Field trips. 

Prerequisites: Geography 103-104 and Biology 101-102 or 104-105, 
or recommendation of the science department. 

401 ADVANCED LABORATORY IN PHYSICAL OR BIOLOG- 
ICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per tceek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Exacting laboratory work of an advanced nature under the guidance 
of the Science Department staff. Each student will present and defend his 
work at a seminar. When registering, the student must indicate whether 
he will take 401 A, the biological work or 40 IB, the physical science work. 

Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of elective science courses, or the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 509. Course description on page 56. 

SCIENCE IN THE KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY GRADES 
2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 345. Course description on page 53. 

SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. 

Credited as Eduation 362. Course description on page 54. 

SCIENCE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 353. Course description on page 57. 



83 



SOCIAL SCIENCE (30) 

Mr. Andrews, Mr. Beishlag, Miss Blood, Mr. Blumberg, Mr. 
Coleman, Mr. Diffenderfer, Mr. Falco, Mr. Firman, Mr. Hutson, 
Mr. Johnston, Miss Kahl (Chairman), Mr. Martin, Mr. Matthews, 
Mr. McCleary, Mr. Onion, Mrs. Ryburn. 

Eighteen semester hours of credit in the social sciences are required 
for teachers college students. The required courses are: 103-104 Elements 
of Geography, 121-122 History of Western Civilization, and 221-222 
History of the United States. 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Students may select an area of concentration in social science with 
emphasis in history, geography, or social studies. The purpose of the area 
of concentration is to provide a planned selection of elective courses be- 
yond the social science requirements of eighteen semester hours in general 
education, so that prospective teachers may develop greater proficiency in 
history, geography, or social studies. Those who are preparing to teach 
history, geography, and the social studies in the junior high school should 
check carefully the requirements for certification. 

EMPHASIS IN HISTORY 

Three to six credit hours must be selected from the electives in soci- 
ology, economics, political science or geography. Eight to twelve hours 
must be selected from the electives in history. 

EMPHASIS IN GEOGRAPHY 

Three credit hours must be selected from the electives in sociology, 
economics or poKtical science. Eleven or twelve hours are required from 
the geography electives. 

EMPHASIS IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

Those who wish this more general emphasis must take nine credit 
hours as follows: 301 Introduction to Sociology, 305 Introduction to Eco- 
nomics, 306 Government of the United States. Five to six additional hours 
must include one elective in geography and one other course in the social 
science department. 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY 

103-104 ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY 

3 /jours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Elements of the physical environment and the changes resulting from 
the operation of both human and natural agencies; regional studies with 
emphasis upon interrelations between the physical environment and plant, 
animal and human life; map reading and interpretation. 



84 



309 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA 

3 hours per tveek. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Areal distribution and character of the economic activities in various 
Latin American countries in relation to physical and cultural features. 
Resources and problems of their development; importance of foreign trade 
to the economy; relationships with the United States. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

310 GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The common social, economic and political interests of the major 
regions of the United States. The culture patterns of each region in 
relation to the natural settings in which they have developed. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

311 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A regional analysis and appraisal of the human geography and natural 
resources of Europe. Problems of nationaKty, economic development, and 
cultural conflicts. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104 

314 GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA 

3 hours per tveek. {Credit 3 hours.) First Sem^ester. 

Studies in relationships between physical and cultural features in se- 
lected countries of Asia. Principal human and economic resources, prob- 
lems of development, and role in world affairs. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

316 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The regional distribution of the world's resources, industries, and 
population with emphasis upon problems of international trade. An analy- 
sis of the productive and extractive industries, manufacturing, and com- 
merce in relation to the geographic environment. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

318 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

A regional analysis of the natural resources and human geography of 
Africa. Problems of economic development, nationality and cultural con- 
flicts. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 



85 



319 GEOGRAPHY OF THE USSR 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The regional diversity, natural resources, industrial and agricultural 
areas, and other factors bearing on the Soviet Union as a world power. 
Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 
3 hotirs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Pohtical, social and economic development of the state and its rela- 
tions to major events in the development of the nation. Natural resources; 
regional land use; industrial development, particularly in the Baltimore 
area. Field trips. Field trip expenses about $15, payable when trips are 
taken. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104; History 221-222. 

3 30 GEOGRAPHY LABORATORY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

Practical exercises in cartography, statistics, and field techniques. 
Study of selected visual materials and their use in teaching geography. 
Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

331 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hotirs.) First Semester 1961-62. 

An analysis of the effect of political groupings on man's use of the 
world, and of the influence of the geographic base on political power. 
Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

3 31a Same as 3 31. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

A geographical analysis of urban settlements and the problems pre- 
sented by them. Field study of a typical urban community area. 
Prerequisite: Geography 103-104. 

43 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Reading and research in selected problems in the field of geography. 
Prerequisite: At least 12 hours of Geography and approval of in- 
structor. 

COURSES IN HISTORY 

121-122 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 
3 hotirs per week for ttuo semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 



86 



The development of western man as a social being from post-Roman 
Europe to the present. 

221-222 HISTORY OF THE UNIITED STATES 
3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

The political, economic, social, and cultural forces which have shaped 
the pattern of life in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the origins 
and development of American democracy. 

260 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT WORLD 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The development of early Stone Age Man, the rise and fall of the 
ancient civilizations, and the emergence of Germanic Europe. 

303 SURVEY OF ENGLISH HISTORY TO 1783 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

The evolution of the political, legal, social, economic and cultural 
institutions of England and the spread of the Empire overseas. The triumph 
of Parliament over the monarchy and the development of the Rights of 
Englishmen. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

304 BRITISH HISTORY SINCE 178 3 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

The struggle against France, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of the 
bourgeoisie to political control, the spread of empire, the symbolism of 
the Victorian era, and the evolution of democratic process. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 
304a Same as 304. (Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

312 EUROPE SINCE 1914 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Events leading to World War I, the course of the conflict, and the 
peace which followed. The rise of conflicting political ideologies between 
wars; the origins, strategies, and results of World War II. The material 
achievements of the modern age. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 
Course description on page 84. 

321 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1820 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Spanish and Portuguese colonization of the New World; natural re- 
sources, government, economic and social life, and the War of Indepen- 
dence. 



87 



322 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1820 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Origin, political growth, and economic development of the Latin 
American republics, with emphasis upon present-day conditions. 

333 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

American economic development from the colonial period to the 
present, with an emphasis upon trends and problems of contemporary 
importance. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 

3 52 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

American foreign poHcy from the Revolutionary War to the present. 
Prerequisite: History 221-222. 

352a Same as 3 52. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

361 MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

The principal currents of social and iatellectual development in 
medieval Europe. Political and social theory, economic patterns, the church 
and major religious movements. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

362 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The social and intellectual changes in Western Europe between 13 50 
and 1650 which mark the transition from medieval to the modern world. 
Special attention to background development and impact on Western 
culture. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

362a Same as 362. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

363 EUROPE 1648-1815 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

The European State system — political changes within and relations 
between its various units — studied with reference to the expansion of 
European civihzation, intellectual growth and class relationships which cul- 
minated in the French Revolution and Napoleon. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

364 EUROPE 1815-1914 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 



88 



The major economic, political, social, and intellectual currents of the 
period. The effects of the industrial revolution, the development of nation- 
alism and imperialism, the origin of the first world war. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

365 HISTORY OF ASIA SINCE 1500 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

The social, political, and cultural institutions of the major Asian 
powers from early modern times. The impact of Western civilization upon 
Asia, the crisis of the 20th century and current problems of that area. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

370 RUSSIA SINCE 1800 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

Russian development since 1800, stressing the poHtical and economic 
conditions which form the background for the revolution of 1917. An 
analysis of the Soviet Regime, 1917 to the present. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

370a Same as 370. {Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

405 CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 

The historical forces resulting in the formation of the constitution; 
the development of American constitutionaHsm in theory and practice. 

414 INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Historical development of American intellectual hfe from the seven- 
teenth century to the present. 

415 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

The everyday Hfe of Americans from the seventeenth century to the 
present. 

416 RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The economic, social and political history of the United States since 
1914 as it affects the present status and future development of the Ameri- 
can people. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222 

420 PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1961-62. 



89 



Reading and research dealing with a particular phase of history with 
considerable attention to sources and historiography. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122; 221-222 and approval of instructor. 

421 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Selected problems in the Revolutionary and Constitutional periods. 
The technique and methodology of historical research and writing. 
Prerequisite: History 221-222 and approval of instructor. 

502 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A reading and research course dealing with the fields of European and 
American history in modern times. Various periods of development will 
be stressed alternately by the instructor, and particular attention will be 
given to the techniques of research and to bibliography. Prerequisite: His- 
tory 121-122, one elective in European history, and one elective in Ameri- 
can history or approval of instructor. 

503 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of recent problems faced by states in their relationships with 
each other. Ample opportunity will be given to the student to pursue 
topics of individual interest, and to present the results of such investiga- 
tion to the seminar. Political, economic, social, and cultural relationships 
among nations will be considered as worthwhile areas of research. Prere- 
quisite: History 121-122; 221-222 and Pohtical Science 307. 

COURSES IN ECONOMICS, POLITICAL 
SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY 

ECONOMICS 

202 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

(For Junior College students. See course description 305 below.) 

305 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Contemporary economic problems. The development of business 
organizations; production and pricing; the banking system; and national 
income and its distribution. 

315 PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF ECONOMICS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Economic principles and problems with particular emphasis on public 



90 



finance, agriculture, population growth, labor, international trade, and 
comparative economic systems. 

Prerequisite: Economics 305. 

325 CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1960-61. 

Non-corporate forms of economic enterprise; internal and functional 
organization of the corporation; the combination movement; regulation 
of combinations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

206 GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

(For Junior College students. See course description 306 below.) 

306 GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The structure and functions of the government of the United States 
and the problems involved in the extension of the scope of democratic 
government in our contemporary life. 

307 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The policies pursued and methods used by states in attempting to 
achieve their objectives in relations with other states. Sovereignty, power 
politics, balance of power, imperialism. The organization and role of the 
United Nations in international relations. 

Prerequisite: Geography 103-104 and History 121-122. 

308 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF FOREIGN POWERS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A comparative survey of the constitutional and legal processes of 
England, France, Russia, Italy, Germany, China and Japan, Some attention 
to the smaller social-democratic states of Europe. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

351 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1960-61. 

Political thought in the West from the Greeks to the present, em- 
phasizing the great political thinkers, the intellectual movements in polit- 
ical theory, and their role in shaping the ideologies of the present world. 

Prerequisite: History 121-122. 

3 5 5 THE LATIN AMERICAN POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours,) First Semester 1960-61. 



91 



Diplomatic and cultural relations between the United States and 
Latin America. The Pan-American Movement, implementing the Monroe 
Doctrine, and the advent of the Good Neighbor Policy. 

Prerequisite: History 221-222. 

3 5 5a Same as 355. (Credit 3 hours.) See page 47. 

417 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 

2 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1961-62. 

Origin and development of the American two-party system. The 
activities of pressure groups and organizations, and the ensuing eflfects 
upon the party system. 

SOCIOLOGY 

201 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

(For Junior College students. See course description for Sociology 301 

below. ) 

301 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The development of group life of man. Patterns of individual and 
group behavior, social interaction, the rise and diflFusion of culture elements, 
custom and fashion, caste and social classes, partriarchal and matriarchal 
societies, folkways, family and tribal organization. 

344 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 
2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The growth and development of the adult and the problems of physi- 
cal, mental and social adjustment in conjugal life. This course is carried 
on in cooperation with other departments of the college as well as with 
social agencies of the community. (Open to juniors and seniors only.) 

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. 

Credited as Education 361. Course description on page 52. 

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

3 hotirs per week. 

Credited as Education 354. Course description on page 55. 



92 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

PURPOSE 

The Master of Education program is intended to help successful, cer- 
tified Maryland elementary school teachers to improve their professional 
quahfications. Although built around a core of required courses, the pro- 
gram is tailored to suit the needs and interests of the individual as indicated 
by (a) his undergraduate record, (b) the demands of his position as a 
classroom teacher, and (c) the considered judgments of his supervisors, 
employers, and college teachers. Since the program is planned primarily 
for teachers in service, the courses are offered principally during the sum- 
mer session and in the evening. 

OBJECTIVES 

1. To help successful teachers continue to develop understandings 
and appreciations characteristic of broadly educated individuals. 

2. To enable teachers of professional promise to increase their com- 
petence as teachers. 

3. To increase the student's appreciation of the role of the teacher 
and of education in our complex world order. 

4. To provide a deeper and more functional understanding of human 
growth and development. 

5. To encourage a spirit of inquiry and to develop an acquaintance 
with recent studies in one's field of interest. 

6. To assist teachers in building more eflFective ways of working with 
students, professional colleagues, and residents of their commun- 
ity. 

ADMISSION 

Full admission is granted in the order of the receipt of applications 
on the basis of (a) an undergraduate average of B, (b) an interview with 
a graduate council member, and (c) two years of satisfactory teaching 
experience. 

The Admission procedure is as follows: 

1. Obtain an application form from the Director of Admissions, 
Graduate Division. 

2. Fill out and return the form to the Admissions Office (Graduate 
Division) and request the registrar of each college previously at- 
tended to send a transcript to the Director of Admissions. 

3 . Await a call from the college for an appointment with a member 
of the graduate council or admissions staff. 



93 



ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE 

Those wishing to become degree candidates should make application 
to the Dean of Intruction after completion of nine to twelve semester 
hours including the three required courses, attainment of a B average, and 
approval by the faculty adviser of a tentative degree program. Other con- 
siderations upon which favorable action will be based are: completion of 
two or more years of meritorious service as a teacher and a satisfactory 
score on the Teacher Education Examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

A. Completion of a program approved by an adviser including 
at least 30 semester hours with a B average. 

B. A distribution of hours so that not fewer than 9 nor more than 

12 are in professional education. The remainder of the 21 elec- 
tive hours may be in one or more of the departments other than 
Education. 

C. An approved special project. The student should apply for a sec- 
ond adviser when selecting a project. The introduction to the 
project may be written while completing the required introduc- 
tion to research course, or later. The completed project report 
must be presented to the two advisers by March 1 of the year in 
which the degree is anticipated; it must have the approval signa- 
tures of the advisers and be filed with the Dean of Instruction by 
May 1 of the year. 

D. Satisfactory performance on an examination that will relate 
principles of each student's special area of interest to the three 
required courses. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level work may be 
transferred from other accredited institutions. 

TIME LIMITATION 

All work credited toward the master's degree must be completed 
within a seven-year period. 

STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 

The graduate student should be mentally and physically healthy as 
well as socially mature. To insure the achievement of these objectives, the 
following are being developed as part of the Towson graduate program: 
(1) selective admissions, (2) cumulative records, (3) counseHng, (4) 
health services, (5) a varied activities program, (6) financial aid, and 
(7) assistance with placement. 



94 



Although independent planning and study along with cooperative 
group work with other students is emphasized, each graduate student will 
have a faculty adviser. If possible, the adviser will be the faculty member 
preferred by the student. After admission to candidacy one more faculty 
xnember will be appointed to form the student's advisory committee. The 
student must have the signature of his advisor for each registration. 

GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES 

At least one-half of the student's courses must be at the 500 level, 
designed exclusively for graduate students. Other courses may be taken at 
the 400 level (open to junior and seniors), but the instructor will expect 
graduate students to do graduate level work in these courses. 

Seniors in their final semester may request permission to register for as 
many as five semester hours of 500 level if they are within five semester 
hours of completing their baccalaureate degree requirement and if their 
vxndergraduate work has been of suflSciently high calibre. (These five hours 
may count toward the master's degree if they are in excess of the baccalau- 
reate degree requirement.) 

THE REQUIRED CORE OF COURSES 

EDUCATIONAL IDEAS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) (Offered each summer and occa- 
sionally during the tvinter xvhen there is sufficient demand.) 

Current trends and issues in education as reflecting and influencing 
the social, economic, and political forces in our cultural heritage. (Students 
should include this course among their first six semester hours in the 
program.) 

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of research as a method for solving problems. Contributions 
of research to education. Research processes and procedures. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Tests and Measurements, 
or Elementary Statistics, or consent of instructor. 

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT— ADVANCED 

COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

An advanced course designed for graduate students who have had a 
basic course in Human Growth and Development or Child Psychology. 

A study of the basic factors in the development of human behavior 
with an emphasis on social-cultural learning. The nature and conditions 
of learning as related to physiological, psychological, and sociological devel- 
opment are studied in the light of school practice. A review of contempor- 
ary theories of learning and their curricular implications. 



9 5 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following courses will be scheduled for one evening a week 
during the academic year, or during the six-week summer session, in 
accordance with demands indicated by (a) written requests and (b) 
preregistrations conducted by the college. For course descriptions see 
Courses of Instruction beginning on page 47. 

Art 420 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 
4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 401 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 426 METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF READING 
INSTRUCTION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Education 426a Same as 426. See page 46. 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 430 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL- 
ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hoitrs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 508 SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF ARITHME- 
TIC 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 509 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 405 HISTORY OF CRITICISM 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

English 422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 430 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Health 405 SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

2 hoti-rs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Philosophy 40 1 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Physical Education 420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



96 



Psychology 402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 403 MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Psychology 404 PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 40 5 PERSONALITY, ITS ANALYSIS, DEVELOPMENT 

AND EVALUATION 
3 hours week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 420 MENTAL HYGIENE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 502 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

2 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Psychology 502a Same as 502. See page 47. 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 503 SEMINAR IN SELECTED PROBLEMS IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per iveek. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 405 CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 414 INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

2 hotirs per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Social Science 415 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Social Science 416 RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 417 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 420 PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 



97 



Social Science 42 1 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hours.) 

Social Science 430 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN 
GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 502 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN 

CIVILIZATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 503 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY INTER- 
NATIONAL RELATIONS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

EXPENSES - GRADUATE 

The tuition cost is $15.00 per semester hour. There is a registration 
fee for non-Maryland residents of $15.00. 

During the summer session a weekly fee of $10.00 includes room and 
two meals a day (breakfast and dinner) Monday through Friday. Lunch- 
eon may be purchased in the cafeteria. Meals will not be served on the week- 
ends. Students may, of course, occupy their rooms over the week-ends 
and take meals outside. A fee of $2.50 for the use of service rooms and 
mail box will be charged summer resident students. 

In addition to the above expenses, there will be only those for books 
and incidental expenses. 

Fees are due on registration day and at the time of registration for 
those who register by mail. By special arrangements board may be paid 
in two installments. A fee of $5.00 is assessed for those who fail to 
complete registration by the time of the first class meeting. No late 
registrations will be accepted after the third day of a session. 



98 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

AND TRUSTEES OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

President: Jerome Framtom, Jr., Federalsburg 

Vice-President: William A. Gunter, Cumberland 

Secretary and State Superintendent of Schools: Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Members: Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Chevy Chase 
Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin, Aberdeen 
DwiGHT O. W. Holmes, Baltimore 
George C. Rhoderick, Jr., Middletown 
Richard Schifter, Bethesda 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Earle T. Hawkins, President 

Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 

Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 

Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 

Agnes T. Debauch, Acting Registrar 

Karl J. Moser, Business Manager 

Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

Faynelle Newland, Director of Residence Halls 

Mariana H. Ward, Director of Health Services 

Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 

Elsie Pancoast Wasson, Dietitian 

Odin Tidemand, Maintenance Superintendent 

FACULTY AND STAFF, 1959-1960 

Earle T. Hawkins, President 

A.B., Western Maryland College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., Western Maryland College 

Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 

A.B., Hastings College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania; LL.D., Doane College 

Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 



99 



Robert W. Abendroth, Education 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Ed., University of Vermont; graduate study, 

Temple University 

Howard B. Anderson, Education 

B.A., Western "Washington College of Education; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study, Pennsylvania State University 

Herbert D. Andrews, History 

A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwestern University; graduate study, 

Northwestern University 

Allene B. Archer, Mathematics 

A.B., Randolph-Macon CoUege; M.Ed., University of Virginia; graduate 
study, Harvard University; Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Johns Hopkins University; Cornell University 

John R. Bareham, Physical Science 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D, Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

George A. Beishlag, Geography 

A.B., Wayne University; M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of 

Maryland 

George W. Belden, Biological Science 

B.S., Cornell University; M.A., New York University; graduate study. 
New York University, San Jose State College, Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity 

Alma Bent, Education 

B.S., Wheelock College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

L. Edward Bevins, Engish 

A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
*Robert K. Bing, Psychology 

B.S. in O.T., University of Illinois; M.A., University of Maryland; gradu- 
ate study. University of Colorado, East Carolina College, University of 
Maryland 

Corinne T. Bize, Health, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 

Marjorie F. Bleul, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Loyola College; graduate study, Johns 

Hopkins University 

Pearle Blood, Geography 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; M.A., Columbia University; 

graduate study, University of Chicago 

*Part-time appointment for first semester 1959-1960 



100 



Arnold Blumberg, History 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

John P. Bollinger, Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester; M.M., School 

of Music, University of Michigan; graduate study, University of Iowa, 

University of Maryland 

Ella Bramblett, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., George Peabody CoUege for 

Teachers; graduate study, Colorado State College of Education 

Arthur W. Brewington, Speech 

A.B., Asbury College; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., George Peabody 

College for Teachers 

Thelma S. Brewington, Speech 

B.A., Cotner College; M.A., University of Denver; graduate study, 
Colorado State College of Education, New York University, University 
of Missouri 

Maud J. Broyles, Education 

A.B., Concord State Teachers College; M.A., Northwestern University; 

graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Grayson S. Burrier, Education 

A.B., Catawba College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, University of Maryland 

Frances M. Clarke, 'Psychology, Education 

A.B., Barnard College; A.M., Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

George C. Coleman, Social Sciences 

A.B., The College of the Ozarks; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., 

State University of Iowa 

David L. Cornthwaite, Education 

B.S., State Teachers CoUege at Towson; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study. University of Maryland 

Esther S. Coulange, Music 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.A., New York 

University; graduate study. University of Rochester 

Louis T. Cox, Physical Science 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D. Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Eunice K. Crabtree, English 

A.B., M.A., George "Washington University; Ed.D., Johns Hopkins 

University 

CoMPTON N. Crook, Biological Science 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study, George 

Peabody College for Teachers, Johns Hopkins University 



101 



Jane Daniels, Physical Education 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Norman R. Diffenderfer, Geography 

B.S., State Teachers College, Shippensburg; M.A., University of Nebra- 
ska; graduate study, University of Nebraska 

John Duro, Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Syracuse University; graduate study. New York Univer- 
sity 

Howard R. Erickson, Biological Science 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Warren D. Evans, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University, Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

Joseph A. Falco, Social Science 

B.A., Duquesne University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

David Firman, Geography, Social Science 

B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 

Regina I. Fitzgerald, Education 

A.B., Western Maryland College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Maryland 

Herbert N. Foerstel, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Hamilton College; M.A., in Library Science, Rutgers University 

Ethel G. Gardner, Assistant Dietitian 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene 
and Public Health 

Katharine Gilcoyne, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., University of Cahfornia, Berkeley; Ed.D., 
Teachers College, Columbia University 

W. Frank Guess, English 

A.B., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North Carolina 

David F. Guillaume, Art 

B.F.A., Alfred University; M.A., Syracuse University; graduate study, 
Ohio State University 

William H. Hartley, Education — Director of Junior High School 
Progravt 

B.S., Springfield College; M.S., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity 



102 



Charles A. Haslup, Music 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., University of Maryland; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Wilfred B. Hathaway, Science 

B.S., Massachusetts State College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; 
Ph.D. Cornell University 

Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Syracuse University; M.A., Cornell University; Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 

"•'Elaine R. Hedges, English 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., Radcliflfe College; graduate study, Harvard 

University 

Ruth Ann Heidelbach, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.Ed., University of Florida 

Marjorie R. Henry, English 

A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Richard L. Holler, Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Frostburg; M.Ed., Western Maryland 

College 

C. Gladys Hughes, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
A.B., Women's College, University of North Carolina; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study. New York University, 
Johns Hopkins University 

Nina Hughes, English 

A.B., Florida State College for Women; M.A., Catholic University of 
America; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University, Northwestern Uni- 
versity 

Harry M. Hutson, History 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Rita Iskowitz, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., George Washington University; 

graduate study, Catholic University, George Washington University, 

University of Maryland 

Edward R. Johnston, History, Admissions 

B.S.S., Spring Hill College; M.A., University of Detroit; graduate study, 

Rutgers University 

Mary Catherine Kahl, History 

A.B., M.A., University of Maryland; graduate study, University of 

Wisconsin 



'■"Part-time appointment, 1959-1960 



103 



Perry M. Kalick, Assistant Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia 

University 

Earl W, Killian, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. New York University 

William C. Kramer, Drama, Speech 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study. 

New York University 

* Robert E. Laubach, Mathematics 

A.B., Eastern Michigan University; M.S., University of Michigan 

John Smith Lewis, English 

A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Brown University; Ph.D., New York 

University 

Elsie H. Ludlow, Stipervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Cornell University; M.A., New York University 

* *Mary Norris Lynch, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
Diploma, Maryland State Normal School; additional study, Western Mary- 
land College, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Hazel E. MacDonald, Music 

B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

Frank A. Mann, Psychology, Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Curtis V. Martin, Geography 

B.S., State Teachers College, Trenton; M.A., Clark University; graduate 

study, Clark University 

John Carter Matthews, History, 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

John W. McCleary, History 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

Johns Hopkins University 

Robert Melville, Physical Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Slippery Rock; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Lloyd D. Miller, Art 

B.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Harvard University; graduate study. 
New York University 



*Part-time appointment for 19J9-1960 
** Appointed for 1959-1960 



104 



Jean C. Milnor, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Goucher College; M.S., in Library Science, Syracuse University 
Donald I. Minnegan, Physical Education, Director of Athletics 
B.Phys.Ed., Springfield College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D,, 
George Washington University 

John B. Mitchell, Art 

B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study, 

Teachers College, Columbia University 

Frances C. Moore, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Goucher College 

William T. Moorefield, Physical Science 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.Ed., Loyola College; graduate study, 

University of Maryland 

Harold E. Moser, Director of Testing Services, Psychology 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Duke University 

Karl J. Moser, Business Manager 

B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., George Washington 

University; graduate study, George Washington University, University of 

Maryland. 

Harold E. Muma, Biological Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Maryland; graduate study. University of Mary- 
land 

Samuel H. Nass, Art 

B.S., Ohio University; M.F.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Edward Neulander, Psychology, Education 

B.S., City College of New York; M.S., Cornell University; Ed.D., Cornell 

University 

Faynelle Newland, Director of Residence Halls 
B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 
Lois D. Odell, Biological Science 

A.B., New York State College for Teachers; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity 

Charles C. Onion, Social Sciences 

B.S., University of Minnesota; B.M., MacPhail School of Music; M.A., 

University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Willie E. Page, Jr., English 

A.B., East Carolina College; M.A., Florida State University 

William F. Pelham, Physical Science 

B.Ch.E., Clarkson College of Technology; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 



10) 



Patrick C. Phelan, Jr., College Physician 

A.B., Loyola College; M.D., University of Maryland 

James A. Phillips, Jr., Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Salisbury; M.Ed., University of Maryland; 

graduate study, Michigan State University 

Stanley M. Pollack, Art 

B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study, New York University 

Florence Pressman, Assistant Director of Residence Halls 

B.S., Simmons College; M.A., Teachers College; Columbia University 

Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 

A.B., Susquehanna University; B.S., in Library Science, Drexel Institute 

of Technology; M.A., in Library Science, University of Michigan 

Carl Reitenbach, Health 

B.S., State University Teachers College, Cortland, New York; M.A., 

New York University 

Mary E. Roach, Physical Education 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 
'^Willie L. Rose, History 

A.B., Mary Washington College; graduate study, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity 

Edward I. Rubendall, Physical Science 

A.B., Illinois College; M.S., University of Illinois; graduate study. Uni- 
versity of Illinois 

Betty C. Ryburn, Sociology 

A.S., A.B., Marshall College; M.A., Ohio University 
Marion Stiles Sargent, English 

A.B., Trinity University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Texas 

Julia R. Sawyer, English 

A.B., Bennington College;- M. A., Johns Hopkins University 

Harvey L. Saxton, Education 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College; M.A., Ph.D. University of 

Connecticut 

**Lenora Schwartz, Art 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Temple University; graduate study. University of Penn- 
sylvania, Columbia University 

Marguerite S. Seaman, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; A.M., University of Chicago 
'•Appointed for first semester 1959-1960 
^-Appointed for 1959-1960 



106 



Ellen E. Smith, Assistant Librarian 

B.S., State Teachers College, Millersville; B.S., in Library Science, Trenton 

State College 

Charles N. Somers, English, News Bureau 

B.A., Wayne University; M.A., University of Michigan; graduate study, 

University of Michigan, University of Maryland 

Kenneth T.Stringer, Biological Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of Maryland 

Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 

A.B., University of Tennessee; M.A., George Peabody College for 

Teachers; Ph.D., Columbia University; study. University of Barcelona 

Beateuce June Thearle, English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. University of Maryland 

Zenith Hurst Velie, Education — Director of Kindergarten-Primary 
Progravi 

B.Mus., Palmer College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
M.Ed., University of Maryland; graduate study, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Northwestern University, Syracuse University 

Marvin C. Volpel, Mathematics 

A.B., Western Michigan University; M.A,, University of Michigan; Ed.D., 

Michigan State University 

Ernest O. von Schwerdtner, Modern Languages 

A.B., St. Johns College; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University 

Mariana H. "Ward, Director of Health Services 

R.N., Oglethorpe Sanitarium; B.S., Western Reserve University 

Elsie P. Wasson, Dietitian 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Emma E. Weyforth, Music 

A.B., Goucher College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 

Walter W. Williamson, Education 

A.B., Lafayette College; Ed.M., Temple University; Ed.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

A. Isabel Wilner, Assistant Librarian, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.A., WilHam Smith College; B.S., in Library Science, Carnegie Institute 

of Technology 

Neil Dean Wilson, Psychology and Education 

B.S., State University of New York Teachers College, Brockport; M.A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study, Teachers College, 
Columbia University 



107 



Phineas p. Wright, English 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Virginia; graduate 

study, University of Virginia 

Arthur C. Yarbrough, Jr., Physical Science 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; graduate study, George Peabody College for Teachers 

Merle Yoder, Assistant Librarian 

Diploma in Library Science, Western Reserve University; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

Mildred Zindler, Art 

A.B., Florida State University; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 

University 

Margaret C. Zipp, Mathematics 

B.S., Douglass College, Rutgers University; M.A., University of Pitts- 
burgh; graduate study, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Clark Univer- 
sity, University of Pennsylvania 



108 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 
KINDERGARTEN - PRIMARY DIVISION 

1959- 1960 

Mrs. Charlotte Albrecht, Kindergarten, Robert Poole Elementary 
School 

Mrs. Catherine Burke, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 

Mrs. Dorothy Busick, Kindergarten, Franklin D. Roosevelt Elementary 
School 

Miss Ann Carney, Grade two, FuUerton Elementary School 

Mrs. Virginia Churchill, Grade one, Lutherville Elementary School 

Miss Bernice Cronin, Kindergarten, Yorkwood Elementary School 

Mrs. Alma Denny, Grade one, Gray Manor Elementary School 

Mrs. Viola Dischler, Kindergarten, Gardenville Elementary School 

Mrs. Mildred Dix, Grade three, Fallstaff Elementary School 

Mrs. Catherone Gill, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 

Mrs. Josephine Hurley, Kindergarten, Gaithersburg Elementary School 

Mrs. Virginia Kiefer, Grade one, Edmondson Heights Elementary School 

Mrs. Alma McMahon, Grade two, Montebello Elementary School 

Mrs. Joan B. Nacman, Grade three, Elmwood Elementary School 

Mrs. Margarat Naumann, Kindergarten, Mordecai Gist Elementary 
School 

Miss Angela Pieper, Kindergarten, Cross Country Elementary School 

Mrs. Louise Rankin, Kindergarten, Montebello Elementary School 

Mrs. Nell Robertson, Grade one. Lone Oak Elementary School 

Mrs. Virginia Schorr, Kindergarten, William Paca Elementary School 

Miss Thelma Smerkar, Grade one, Mt. Royal Elementary School 

Miss Yvette Velie, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 

Mrs. Winifred Wilson, Grade one, Westowne Elementary School 

Miss Iris Zimmerman, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 

COOPERATING TEACHERS 
ELEMENTARY DIVISION 

1959- 1960 

Mrs. Janice Bennett, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Miss Greeba Berry, Grade four, Gilpin Manor Elementary School 
Mrs. Christine Bobo, Grade five. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Frances Brooks, Grade four, Edgemere Elementary School 



109 



Mrs. Shirley Coleman, Grade five, Hampton Elementary School 

Mr. Charles Connor, Grade six, Northwood Elementary School 

Mr. James Cox, Grade six, Thomas Johnson Elementary School 

Mrs. Mariesther Dando, Grade two. Loch Raven Elementary School 

Mrs. Elaine Davis, Grade two, Fullerton Elementary School 

Mrs. Doris DiDomenico, Grade five, Villa Cresta Elementary School 

Mrs. Merrill Egger, Grade four, Westowne Elementary School 

Mrs. Helen Fowler, Grade four, Oakleigh Elementary School 

Mrs. Alice Gibson, Grade one, Fullerton Elementary School 

Mrs. Gladys Grimes, Grade four, Franklin Elementary School 

Mrs. Beatrice Hopper, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 

Mr. Herman Jackson, Grade five, Parkville Elementary School 

Mrs. Lillian Lunz, Grade five. Villa Cresta Elementary School 

Mrs. Dorothy McFadden, Grade five, Edgemere Elementary School 

Mrs. Dorothy Moler, Grade two. Villa Cresta Elementary School 

Mr. Parker Morrill, Grade six, Hampton Elementary School 

Mr. Henry Muller, Grade four. Pleasant Plains Elementary School 

Miss Hallie Odgers, Grade five, Oakleigh Elementary School 

Mrs. Narvella Phillips, Grade two, Taneytown Elementary School 

Mrs. Carolyn Portman, Grade two. Villa Cresta Elementary School 

Mrs. Ruth Rattan, Grade three, Parkville Elementary School 

Mrs. Lena Reilly, Grade six, Waverly Elementary School 

Mrs. Arlene Rodney, Grades one ^ two, Towson Elementary School 

Mrs. Margaret Rudigier, Grade six, Leith Walk Elementary School 

Mrs. Frieda Schaeffer, Grade three. Loch Raven Elementary School 

Mrs. Margaret Shea, Grade one, Dundalk Elementary School 

Mrs. Shirley Smith, Grade two, Waverly Elementary School 

Miss Edith Stark, Grade three, Lyndhurst Elementary School 

Mrs. Rena Sugar, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 

Mr. Bernard Taylor, Grades five & six, Arhngton Elementary School 

Mrs. Jean Taylor, Grade four, Montebello Elementary School 

Miss Margaret Tewes, Grade three, Montebello Elementary School 

Miss Margaret Van Breeman, Grade three, Hampton Elementary School 

Mrs. Pearl Vincent, Grade five, Dundalk Elementary School 

Mrs. Evelyn "Walker, Grade two, Havre de Grace Elementary School 

Mrs. Grace Walters, Grade three, Wakefield Elementary School 



no 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 

ELEMENTARY DIVISION 

1959 - 1960 con't. 

Mrs. Marcella Wilson, Grade jive, Lutherville Elementary School 
Miss Addie Wheeler, Grade jive, Franklin Elementary School 
Mrs. Polly Young, Grade three, Hampden Elementary School 
Mr. Harry Zemel, Grade six. Liberty Elementary School 

COOPERATING TEACHERS 

JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION 

1959-1960 

Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, History, Pimlico Junior High School 

Mr. Donald Algier, Core 8, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mr. Terry Biller, Science, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mr. Robert T. Bissett, Core 7, Hereford Junior-Senior High School 

Mrs. Maudre Bliss, History, Robert Poole Junior High School 

Mrs. Lilly Blum, Geography, Roland Park Junior High School 

Mrs. Ann Boyd, Math 9, Towsontown Junior High School 

Mr. Joseph A. Brusini, Math ^ Science 8, Catonsville Junior High School 

Mrs. Katherine Burhorst, English, Benjamin Franklin Junior High 
School 

Mrs. Dorothea Bush, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mrs. Johanna Cox, Science, Hamilton Jxmior High School 

Mr. John Darnaby, Science 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Miss Gertrude Denaburg, History, Pimlico Junior High School 

Mrs. Annette Downs, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 

Mrs. Stella Federline, Mathematics, Benjamin Franklin Junior High 
School 

Mrs. Cecelia Fink, Social Studies, Garrison Junior High School 

Mrs. Mary Fox, Science, Woodbourne Junior High School 

Mrs. Marie Francis, English, General Henry Lee Jvmior High School 

Mr. L. Craig Gerhard, Geography, Clifton Park Junior High School 

Mr. Edward Godeke, Math-Science, Parkville Junior High School 

Mr. William L. Gray, Math-Science 7, Arbutus Junior High School 

Mrs. Phyllis Heater, English, Roland Park Junior High School 



111 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 

JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION 

1959-1960 con't. 

Mrs. Grace Henderson, Math, Hampstead Hills Junior High School 

Mrs. Ethel High, Science, Bel Air Junior High School 

Mr. Robert J. Huber, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Miss Dorothy Huth, Mathematics, Clifton Park Junior High School 

Mr. John Jedlicka, Math-Science, Stemmers Run Junior High School 

Mr. Donald Kelbaugh, Science 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Mr. William P. Kildow, Core 9, Towsontown Junior High School 

Miss Rose Anna Kottler, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 

Mr. Bernard Loraditch, Core 8, Middle River Junior High School 

Mr. Franklin Lynch, Core 8, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mr. Clarence Maiden, Math ^ Science 7, Towsontown Junior High 
School 

Miss Myrtle Marcum, English, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mr. Roger Marks, Core 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Mr. Donald B. Maxwell, Core 7, Stemmers Run Junior High School 

Mr. John Metzger, Math ^ Science, Sudbrook Junior High School 

Mr. Edward Mitzel, Core 8, Dumbarton Junior High School 

Miss Marguerite Muller, Mathematics, Roland Park Junior High School 

Mr. Frederick D. Osing, Jr., Core 9, Catonsville Junior High School 

Mr. Robert Palter, Core 8, Sudbrook Junior High School 

Mrs. Margaret Payne, Core 7, Parkville Junior High School 

Mr. Alfred Proffit, Geography, Hamilton Junior High School 

Miss Annie Rampley, Core 8, Parkville Junior High School 

Mrs. Magdalene Rice, English, Garrison Junior High School 

Mr, Julius Rosenthal, History, Garrison Junior High School 

Miss Charlotte Schloss, English, Hamilton Junior High School 

Mrs. Edith P. Sloop, Core 8, Towsontown Junior High School 

Mrs. Mary T. Thomas, Core 8, Catonsville Junior High School 

Mr. William "Webb, Math & Science, 9, Parkville Junior High School 

Mr. Vaughn H. Weimer, Math & Science, 7 (3 %, Golden Ring Junior 
High School 

Mr. Donald G. Wenck, Math ?3 Science 7, Catonsville Junior High 
School 



112 



Mr. Douglas Woodbourn, Math ^ Science 9, Parkville Junior High 

School 

Mr. Bernard Yaffe, English, General Henry Lee Junior High School 

Mr. Sidney Zeltzer, History, Pimlico Junior High School 

OTHER STAFF MEMBERS AND ASSISTANTS 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Joan L. Albinsky, Senior Stenographer 

Margaret V. Barrett, Senior Stenographer 

RosEMARiE C. CuLOTTA, Senior Stenographer 

Ruth S. Davis, Receptionist and Switchboard Operator 

Marguerite S. German, Senior Stenographer 

Adda L. Gilbert, Administrative Assistant 

Frances Gill, Stenographer-Secretary 

KathryN S. Gordon, Principal Stenographer 

John S. Gwynn, Reproduction Machines Operator 

Lindsay Ann Leedy, Senior Stenographer 

Lela B. Magness, Senior Stenographer 

Annamarie C. Mayer, Senior Typist 

Arline p. Wbldason, Senior Stenographer 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE 

Patricia L. Faber, Senior Stenographer 

C. Elizabeth Owings, Stenographer-Secretary 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Margaret G. Barall, Principal Account Clerk 
Ruth J. Bartol, Junior Account Clerk 
Jane E. Eagler, Senior Account Clerk 
Geraldine Jaworski, Senior Account Clerk 
Helen V. Redel, Stenographer, Accounting 
Helen B. Kelly, Post Office Clerk 

REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 

Dianne I. Davis, Senior Typist 
Ann L. Kelleher, Senior Typist 



113 



Paula S. Peters. Senior Typist 

Ethel L. Richmond, Senior Stenographer 

ALBERT S. COOK LIBRARY 

June M. Baines, Senior Typist 
Eleanor E. Becker, Library Assistant 
Bernice K. Cox, Library Assistant 
M. Louise Pace, Library Assistant 
Howard E. Walters, Junior Clerk 

LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 

Winifred N. Baker, Stenographer-Secretary 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Mary E. Basler, Stipervisor of Residence, Newell Hall 
Florence A. Clements, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 
Florence Perrine, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 
Virginia K. Tilghman, Supervisor of Residence, Prettyman Hall 
Josephine Wagemann, Supervisor of Residence, Ward Hall 
*Warren D. Evans, Faculty Counselor, West Hall 
Elizabeth E. Starr, Senior Stenographer 

HEALTH CENTER 

Donna Jean Curtis, Registered Nurse 
Helen Porter, Licensed Practical Nurse 

STUDENT CENTER 

Sue W. Richardson, Book Shop Manager 
Rose Lee Gilbert, Book Shop Assistant 
Margaret A. Drost, "Snack Bar" Manager 
"'Amelia Warner, "Snack Bar" Night Manager 
'■■ Nancy Walbeck, Student Center Hostess 
'■"Mattie E. Ward, Student Center Hostess 
'■Esther Barrett, Student Center Hostess 



"'Part-time 



114 



GRADUATES 

Teachers College 

Bachelor of Science Degrees - June 7, 1959 

Sylvia Adler, Baltimore City 

Doris Yvonne Albert, Baltimore County 

Charles Lee Allen, Baltimore County 

Alva Mary Amoss, Harford County 

Kathryn Peterson Amick, Montgomery County 

Joyce Brown Archer, Baltimore City 

Eleanor Alice Bader, Baltimore City 

Carol Hayes Bailey, Baltimore County 

Jane Austin Bankert, Howard County 

Robert William Barnes, Baltimore City 

Anna Grace Barrick, Frederick County 

Lydia Carol Beachley, Harford County 

Dawn Marlene Beck, Baltimore County 

Sheila Beerman, Baltimore City 

Frances Adele Beimschla, Baltimore County 

Nadine Annette Bell, Washington County 

Tamar Belsky, Baltimore City 

Amy Corinthia Benham, Carroll County 

Debra Charlotte Berger, Baltimore City 

James Bruce Binko, Baltimore County 

Paul Frederick Birckner, Prince George's County 

Rita Fiskin Blecman, Baltimore City 

Mary Patricia Bloxham, Harford County 

Ann Mitchell Branch, Lynchburg, Virginia 

Eleanor Anne Brocato, Baltimore City 

Eileen Anne Broderick, Prince George's County 

Joan Rollman Broderick, Baltimore County 

Beth Frances Brodkin, Baltimore City 

Anita Mildred Brown, Carroll County 

Barbara Bayne Brown, Baltimore County 

Marvis Evon Brown, Baltimore County 

Carole Anne Brydon, Baltimore City 

Mary Ingham Bulcken, Baltimore City 

Virginia Ford Carl, Baltimore County 

Elspeth McGilchrist Carswell, Baltimore County 

Albert Joseph Cauffman, Baltimore County 

Kathleen Elizabeth Clagett, Montgomery County 



115 



Joan Naomi Clemons, Baltimore County 
Ilene Esther Cohen, Baltimore City 
Nancy Carol Morningstar Combs, Baltimore City 
Norma Jean Rinaca Cook, Baltimore County 
Eva Graser Cooper, Baltimore County 
Madaleste Lee Cox, Harford County 
Marcia Radin Craven, Baltimore City 
Margaret Catherine Crouse, Caroline County 
Courtney Marlene Cutsail, Frederick County 
Joan Rita Cweiber, Baltimore County 
George Stewart Davis, Baltimore City 
Jean Rogers Davis, Baltimore City 
Robert William Deller, Baltimore City 
Dorothy Ann Durm DeLuca, Baltimore County 
Nancy Jean Demey, Island Park, New York 
Barbara Ann Derr, Frederick County 
Marne Edith Reichard DeVaughn, Baltimore Co. 
Michael John DeVita, Baltimore County 
Nicholas Charles DiGiacomo, Baltimore County 
Mary Dell Drx, Baltimore County 
Dorothy Jane Dodson, Baltimore County 
Albert Ivor Dorsch, Baltimore County 
Mary Ann Eileen Dundon, Baltimore County 
Anna Marie Durkin, Baltimore County 
Margaret Mary Durkin, Baltimore County 
Malcolm Austin Dutterer, Jr., Baltimore City 
Gail Patricia Eades, Baltimore City 
David Earle Eden, Baltimore County 
Nancy Craig Edwards, Howard County 
Suzanne Louise Eichengreen, Baltimore City 
Catherine Elizabeth Engle, Frederick County 
John Edward Ensor, Baltimore County 
Elizabeth Anne Eser, Baltimore City 
Georgeann Fondulis Fagas, Baltimore County 
Beverly Anne Fedock, Baltimore City 
Sheila Honey Feldman, Baltimore City 
Eleanor Marie Fenwick, St. Mary's Coimty 
Charlotte Lillian Fishman, Baltimore County 
Patricia Jean Filsinger, Garrett County 
Allen Frances Fleishmann, Baltimore County 
Robert Montgomery Forder, Baltimore City 
John Warren Forsyth, Baltimore City 



116 



LiLLiAS Fradl, Baltimore City 
Henry Carson Frank, Baltimore County 
Dorothy Jacobs Friedman, Baltimore City 
Dennis Warren Fry, Baltimore City 
Marilyn Therese Galante, Long Beach, Calif. 
Marilyn Hyman Gamse, Baltimore City 
Brenda Elaine Garonzik, Baltimore City 
Sandra Jane Garrett, Baltimore County 
Richard Garriques, Baltimore County 
Grace Georgandis, Baltimore County 
Edith Louise Gesswein, Baltimore County 
NoRiNE Ginsberg, Baltimore City 
Nancy Elizabeth Girkins, Baltimore County 
Howard Henry Glick, Baltimore City 
Beatrice Roslyn Glinkovsky, Baltimore City 
Barbara Iris Gomberg, Baltimore City 
Janet Mae Gosnell, Baltimore County 
Carolyn Jones Grammer, Baltimore County 
Ruth Hellmann Greenfeld, Baltimore City 
Sue Zaner Griebler, Baltimore City 
Lois Griggs, Baltimore City 
Margaret Louise Gross, Baltimore City 
Joan Margaret Gurke, Yonkers, New York 
Shirley Ann Hackney, Baltimore City 
Margaret Hardin, Baltimore County 
Myra Ann Harris, Baltimore City 
SoNDRA Jane Harrison, Baltimore City 
Yvonne Harsh, Washington County 
Lewis Philip Heck, Aime Arundel Coimty 
Beverly Blanche Heine, Baltimore County 
Shirley Ann Hell wig, Baltimore County 
Florence Henkin, Baltimore City 
Dorothy Zeegler Herbold, Baltimore County 
Charlotte Honey Himelfarb, Baltimore City 
Shirley Elaine Himes, Frederick County 
Patricia Emely Hinton, Baltimore City 
Julia Eleanora Hofferbert, Baltimore City 
Marie Louise Holmead, Montgomery County 
Ethel Chelf Hooker, Baltimore City 
Ruth Goemmer Horn, Baltimore City 
Harold Norman Hough, Baltimore City 
Harold Leese Hughes, Baltimore County 



117 



Lawrence Quail Hutchins, Baltimore County 
Mildred Rand Irvin, Baltimore City 
Catherine "Webster Jackson, Baltimore City 
Edith Jackson, Prince George's County 
Nancy Jalis, Cecil County 
John Bruce Johnson, Baltimore City 
Patricia Lee Johnson, Baltimore County 
Genevieve Herr Johnson, Baltimore County 
Barbara Jean Keplinger, Washington County 
Gilbert Linwood Kerr, Baltimore County 
Charmagne Elaine Kessler, Baltimore City 
David Guthrie King, Baltimore County 
Joan Kirchner, Anne Arundel County 
Louis Henry Kirsch, Baltimore County 
Agatha Akers Kirwan, Baltimore City 
Parker Eugene Koons, Jr, Baltimore City 
Ethel Dacewicz Kougl, Baltimore County 
Maxine Fowble Krajovic, Baltimore County 
Judith Carol Kreusinger, Harford County 
Evelyn Charlotte Kroll, Baltimore County 
Frederick Robett Kruelle, Baltimore City 
Martin David Kurland, Baltimore City 
Margaret Ruby Langdon, Baltimore City 
Patricia Catherine Lastowski, Baltimore County 
Lois Marie Lauman, Baltimore County 
Arthur Lee Laupus, Baltimore City 
Judith Annette Royalene Laws, 

Prince George's County 
Mary Carolyn Lednum, Talbot County 
Lillian Roberta Lee, Baltimore City 
Vivian Elaine Lesher, Baltimore City 
Frederick Wylie Levin, Baltimore City 
Charles Louis Livingston, Baltimore City 
Mary Agnes Lynch, Baltimore County 
Susan Newbold Mace, Harford County 
Catherine Potter Malley, Baltimore County 
Sandra Rottenberg Marder, Baltimore City 
Martin Harry Steffen Marne, Baltimore City 
Robert Michael Mayr, Baltimore City 
Bertha Jordan Mays, Baltimore County 
Gail Gotsch McComas, Baltimore City 
Francis Xavier McGuire, Baltimore County 



118 



Christa Lechelt Menkel, Baltimore County 
Anita Louise Mermelstein, Baltimore City 
Jerry Ronald Merrenblum, Baltimore City 
Kathleen Burns Meushaw, Baltimore County 
Marilyn Sue Miller, Baltimore City 
Marlyn Merle Miller, Baltimore City 
Bobbie-Jane Singer Milligan, Baltimore County 
Frances Ann Moerschel, Baltimore City 
Margaret Elizabeth Moodie, Baltimore County 
Frances Ann Mullendore, "Washington County 
Catherine Mueller Murphy, Baltimore City 
LoRETTA Brown Murphy, Baltimore City 
Ruth Patricia Murphy, Baltimore County 
Earl Alton Myers, Jr. Baltimore County 
LaDonna Myers, Carroll County 
Barbara Ann Nedelsky, Baltimore City 
Helen Roberta Nelson, Prince George's County 
Francis Leroy Noel, Baltimore County 
Anne Elizabeth Oliver, Washington County 
Harriet Ann Orth, Baltimore County 
Allen Barry Oshry, Baltimore City 
Joseph Carroll Oursler, Baltimore County 
Sylvia Hendler Passen, Baltimore City 
Rosalind Eisman Pearlman, Baltimore City 
June Marie Pell, Prince George's County 
LoRNA Olga Penn, Baltimore County 
Alan Leonard Plotkin, Baltimore City 
Hilda Miriam Pollack, Baltimore City 
Jeanette Thalman Pollard, San Diego, California 
Audrey Powell, Baltimore City 
Sue Amos Price, Harford County 
Charlotte Ann Rasin, Kent County 
Charles Hurlock Raynor, Baltimore City 
Patricia May Reagan, Baltimore County 
Harriet Duvall Ressler, Baltimore County 
Dolores Nickel Righter, Baltimore City 
James Joseph Riley, Baltimore City 
Charles Lee Robbins, Cecil County 
Betty June Roberts, Baltimore County 
Catherine Ellen Rockel, Baltimore City 
Sharon Louise Romer, Prince George's County 
Phyllis Rona Rubin, Baltimore City 



119 



James Jospeh Sarnecki, Baltimore City 

Carole Sandler Schapiro, Baltimore City 

Marjanna Scheidt, San Antonio, Texas 

Edward Ludwig Schneider, Anne Arundel Coxmty 

John Edward Schriefer, Baltimore County 

Ruth Estelle Shaeffer, Baltimore City 

Evelyn Kingsley Sherry, Baltimore County 

Richard Shortt, Baltimore County 

Marian Halberson Sibley, Baltimore County 

Gretchen Annette Simmons, Baltimore County 

Joyce Lorraine Simmons, Harford County 

Sue Mae Simmons, Baltimore City 

Carolyn "Williams Smith, Baltimore County 

Prudence Ann Smith, Baltimore City 

Catherine Uebel Smoot, Baltimore County 

Gloryann Kohlenstein Snyder, Baltimore City 

Phyllis Angela Sobotka, Baltimore City 

Judith Horwitz Solomon, Baltimore City 

Louise Lohrfinck Southall, Baltimore City 

Lois Jean Speight, Baltimore City 

Henrietta Lloyd Stenger, Kent County 

Kenneth Guy Stiner, Baltimore County 

Marcia Marie Storm, Baltimore County 

Donna Muriel Story, Baltimore County 

Mary Elizabeth Wimmer Sudbrink, Baltimore Co. 

Warren Clayton Sylvester, Baltimore City 

Irene Marie Tanner, Harford County 

Richard Bruce Taylor, Baltimore City 

Valerie Fern Taylor, Baltimore City 

John James Thomas, Baltimore County 

Elizabeth Jane Thompson, Cecil County 

Joseph Carl Tischer, Anne Arundel County 

Sandra Tobashnick, Baltimore City 

Phyllis Mae Green Treadwell, Baltimore City 

Louis Anthony Truszkowski, Baltimore City 

Chrysanthy Tsakiris, Baltimore City 

Sheela Umin, Baltimore City 

Patricia Frances Wong Uyeda, Baltimore City 

Bertha Eileen Vesper, Baltimore County 

Jane Catherine Vogeler, Baltimore County 

Peggy Ann Volkman, Baltimore City 

Evelyn Wachs, Baltimore City 



120 



Patricia Ann Mullikin Walton, Baltimore County 
Richard Joseph White, Baltimore City 
James Edward Wiedermann, Baltimore City 
John Mitchell Williams, Baltimore County 
Edith Corinne Willoughby, Montgomery County 
Laura Carter Winter, Baltimore City 
Margaret Mary Wisnom, Baltimore County 
Richard Anthony Wolf, Baltimore City 
Donald Charles Wright, Baltimore County 
Shirley Ensor Wright, Baltimore County 
Geraldine Colson Young, Baltimore County 
Helen Lewis Young, Baltimore County 
Shirley Cecilia Ziemski, Baltimore County 

Posi-Baccalaureaie Candidates 

Donald Bernard Dixon, Baltimore City 
Dorothy Ann Wood, Baltimore City 

Associate in Arts 

William Robert Bosley, Baltimore County 
Beverly Anne Budnick, Harford County 
Robert Edward Callary, Harford County 
Nancy Lee Clawson, Baltimore County 
Patricia Ann Ennis, Baltimore County 
Mary Virginia Goode, Baltimore City 
Phyllis Goodman, Baltimore City 
Jean Lawson Hawkins, Baltimore City 
Harriette Virginia Held, Baltimore County 
Judith Blake Holley, Baltimore County 
Janice Jacqueline Jenkins, Baltimore County 
Wilma Elaine Kurth, Baltimore County 
Marlene Catherline Leonhardt, Baltimore City 
Sylvia Jean Lipsitz, Baltimore City 
James Rush Miller, Anne Arundel County 
Ruth Louise Miller, Baltimore County 
William Francis Moessinger, Baltimore City 
Robert Joseph Richards, Baltimore County 
Thomas Jerome Rubbling, Baltimore City 
Mary Emma Smrcina, Baltimore City 
Charles Neil Wolfkill, Baltimore County 



121 



*^enior ^lass Officers of 1959 

President Michael John DeVita 

Yice President Robert Michael Mayr 

Recording Secretary Barbara Ann Nedelsky 

Corresponding Secretary. Maky Elizabeth Sudbrink 
Treasurer Nancy Elizabeth Girkins 

^JHentDers of tne QraciHaiingi CLlass 
^Uctea to JKappa ^belia 9^/ 

Amy Corinthia Benham Vivian Elaine Lesher 

James Bruce Binko Marilyn Sue Miller 

Beth Frances Brodkin Helen Roberta Nelson 

Kathleen Elizabeth Clagett Charlotte Ann Rasin 

Eva Graser Cooper Betty June Roberts 

Eleanor Marie Fenwick j^^^ Edward Schriefer 

Patricia Jean Filsinger j^^^^^^ Halberson Sibley 

NoRiNE Ginsberg ^ tt c - 

„ ^ TT Catherine Uebel Smoot 

Ruth Goemmer Horn ^ ^r 

David Guthrie King Gloryann Kohlenstein Snyder 

Ethel Dacewicz Kougl Judith Horwitz Solomon 

Evelyn Charlotte Kroll Lois Jean Speight 

Patricia Catherine Lastovski Edith Corinne Willoughby 

Lillian Roberta Lee Geraldine Colson Young 

Summary of Graduates 

Junior College A A Certificates June 19 J9 21 

Teachers College B S Degrees June 1959 261 

Total number of Teachers College graduates since 1866 9,425 

Enrollment Summary 1958-59 

Men Women Total 

Junior College 39 64 103 

Teachers College 302 954 1256 

Evening Classes 2 16 18 

Graduate Students 8 25 33 

Grand Total 351 1059 1410 



122 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

1959-1960 

President 

Samuel Sharrow 724 Cloudyfold Drive, Baltimore 8, Md. 

First Vice-President 

William Jenkins 23 Chats worth Ave., Reisterstown, Md. 

Second Vice-President 

QuiNTON Thompson McDonogh School, McDonogh, Md. 

Third Vice-President 

Jacqueline Pfarr 8009 Gough Street, Baltimore 24, Md. 

Treasurer 

James R. Bowerman 8727 Roper Road, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Secretary 
Dorothy Rybka 1729 Lancaster Street, Baltimore 31, Md. 

Board of Directors 

Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, ex officio .... State Teachers College at Towson, 
Baltimore 4, Md. 

Harold Katz 708 Leafydale Terrace, Baltimore 8, Md. 

Donald Leuschner 404 La Clair Ave., Linthicum Heights, Md. 

Mrs. Iva Jenkins Lutz .... 4403 Walther Boulevard, Baltimore 14, Md. 

James J. Sarnecki 2414 Fleet Street, Baltimore 24, Md. 

Dr. M. Theresa Wiedefeld 5403 Tramore Road, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Nancy Hovermale .. State Teachers College at Towson, Baltimore 4, Md. 

Senior Class Representative 



123 



INDEX 



Academic program, 33-35 

Academic regulations, 29 

Accidental injury reimburse- 
ment, 19 

Accreditation, 7 

Administrative OflScers, 99 

Admission 

to advanced standing, 15 
to block of professional 

courses, 31 
to graduate program, 93-94 
to the Junior College, 14 
of liberal arts graduates, 15 
of special students, 15 
to student teaching, 31 
to the Teachers College, 12-14 
of transfer students, 15 

Advisory program, 22, 23 

Alumni, Association, 123 

Application fee and advance 
payments, 17 

Areas of concentration, 33-34 

Art department, 49-52 

Associate in Arts 

conferred June 1959, 115 
requirements for, 44 

Athletic Association, 28 

Attendance, 31-32 

Auditing courses, 29 

Automobile regulations, 25 

Awards and Honors, 33, 122 

Bachelor of Science 

conferred June 1959, 115-122 

requirements for, 34 
Block of professional courses 

requirements for admission, 31 
Buildings, 8-10 

Calendar, 5-6 
Campus, 8-10 
Certification, 3 5 
Change of course 
or schedule, 30 



Classification of students, 30 
Clubs and organizations, 25-29 
Cooperating teachers, 109-113 
Counseling, preadmission, 22 
Courses of instruction 

non-departmental, 48 

numbering of, 47 

offerings by department, 49-92 

required courses, 36-37 

sequence of courses, 37 

time of offering, 47 
Curriculum sequences 

Elementary, 40-41 

Kindergarten-Primary, 38-39 

Junior High School, 42 - 43 

Junior College, 45-46 
Degree, requirements 

Bachelor of Science, 34 

Required Courses, 36-37 
Dining facilities, 10, 16 
Degrees conferred, June 1959, 115 
Dramatic organization, 27 
Education department, 52-60 
Elective courses, 33, 47 
Employment, Student, 22 
Enghsh department, 60-67 
Enrollment 1958-1959, 122 
Expenses, 16-18 
Facilities, 10-11 
Faculty and staff, 99-114 
Fees, 16- 18 

Financial aid for students, 20 - 22 
Future development of college, 11 
Glen, The, 1 1 
Grading system, 30 
Graduate program, 93-98 
Graduates, June 1959, 115-122 
Health Center, 11 
Health Education 

department, 67-68 
Health services, 24 
History of college, 7 



INDEX (Continued) 



Honor societies, 28-29 
Housing and boarding, 16-18 
Junior College 

admissions, 14-15 

degree requirements, 44 - 46 

expenses, 16 

objectives, 8 

program, 44 

transfer, 1 5 
Liability for unpaid tuition, 19 
Library, 9 
Lida Lee Tall School 

building, 9 

calendar, 6 

faculty and staff, 99-114 
Loan funds, 21-22 
Mailing facilities, 11 
Master of Education, 93-98 
Marking and point system, 30 
Mathematics department, 68-70 
Modern Language 

department, 70 - 72 
Music department, 72-74 
Music organizations, 26 
Non-departmental courses, 48 
Objectives, 7-8 
Off campus students, 16 
Organizations and clubs, 24-28 
Orientation courses, 48 
Out-of -State students, 16 
Part-time and summer 

students, 15, 16, 18 
Payment of fees, 17 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, 74 
Physical Education 

department, 75-76 
Placement, 24 
Pledge to teach, 14 
Post Office, 11 
Probation, 30 



Programs and special events, 29 
Psychology department, 76 - 79 
Publications, student, 28 
Refunds, 17, 19 
Registration, 29 
Religious organizations, 26 
Required Courses, 36 
Residence halls 

activities, 2 5 

names, 9-10 

policies, 18 
Resident students 

costs and deposits, 16 

housing and boarding, 16-17 

room furnishing, 18 
Scholarships and loans, 20-22 
Science department, 79-83 
Service organizations, 26 
Social Science department, 84-92 
Special interest clubs, 27-28 
Speech requirement, 31 
Standards of academic work, 31 
State Board of Education, 99 
Student Center, 10 
Student Employment, 22 
Student government 

organizations, 24 - 29 
Student life program, 22-24 
Student load, 29 

Student teaching centers, 104-107 
Summer and part-time 

students, 1 5 
Transripts, 32 
Transfer students, 15 
Tuition, 1 6 
Unpaid tuition, 19 
Veteran students, 23 
Visiting day for freshman 

parents, 23 
Vocational guidance, 23 
Withdrawals, 32 



!^,;,.' 



STATUS OF TEACHING IN MARYLAND 

There exists at present, and will likely exist for the next ten years, 
a serious shortage of qiialified teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 
Within the next decade the pubUc schools of the State will have enrolled 
upwards of a hundred thousand more children than they had in 1950. The 
planned reduction in class size throughout the entire state will improve 
teaching conditions but will also call for more teachers. Never has there 
been a time when graduates of the teachers colleges were more in demand. 

Maryland has been in the forefront in establishing a single salary 
schedule — resulting in teachers with a college degree receiving the same 
salary regardless of whether they teach in the kindergarten, elementary 
school, junior high school, or senior high school of the public school sys- 
tem. 

The increase in number oi schooi posuions means also a corresponding 
increase in the number of administrative and supervisory positions. Such 
positions are generally filled by promoting experienced and able teachers 
who have shown the necessary qualities of leadership and personaUty and 
have prepared themselves for promotion through further study. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



The mailing address 

State Teachers College at Towson 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 

The telephone number 

VAlley 3-7500 

Switchboard open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily 
excej^t Saturday and Sunday 

Specific correspondence should be addressed as toUows: 

ADMISSION MATTERS Director of Admissions 

BUSINESS MATTERS Business Manager 

GENERAL MATTERS President 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS Director of Residence 

SCHOLARSHIPS Dean of Students 

SUMMER SESSION Dean of Instruction, 

and Director of Special Professional Program (for 
teachers lacking full certification) 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS Registrar 



STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT TOWSON 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 




ABBREVIATED CATALOGUE 

1961 - 1962 

Ninety-Sixth Year Begins September, 1961 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar 5 

The State Board of Education; Administrative Officers 7 

Tire College 8 

Campus and Buildings 8 

Objectives 9 

Admission 9 

Expenses : . 10 

The Pledge to Teach 10 

Student Life Program 11 

Health Service 11 

Residence Hall Policies 11 

The Academic Program 13 

Degree Requireinents 14 

Courses Required of All Students 15 

The Teacher Education Program 16 

Courses Required in Education 17 

Sequence of Courses 18 

Arts and Sciences 24 

A First-Year Plan 24 

Changing Programs 25 

Academic Regulations 25 

Courses of Instruction 

Art 30 

Education 31 

English 32 

Health Education 34 

Mathematics 34 

Modern Language 35 

Music 35 

Physical Education 36 

Psychology 36 

Science 37 

Social Science 38 

The Graduate Program 40 

Summary of Graduates 40 

Enrollment Summary 40 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
AT TOWSON, MARYLAND 



1961 
June 24, Saturday 



June 26, Monday 
July 4, Tuesday 
August 4, Friday 



September 10, Sunday 
September 10-14 
September 13, Wednesday 

September 14, Thursday 

September 15, Friday 
September 29, Friday 

October 13, Friday 

November 10, Friday 

November 22, Wednesday 

November 26, Sunday 
November 27, Monday 
December 12, Tuesday 

December 20, Wednesday 

1962 
January 2, Tuesday 



Calendar for 1961 - 1962 



Summer Session 

Registration for classes, 9 a.m. to 12 

noon, Stephens Hall 
Registration for residence, 9 a.m. to 12 

noon, Newell Hall 
Classes begin 
No classes 

End of summer session 
Residence halls close 5 p.m. 

First Semester 

Residence halls open for new students, 
1 p. m. to 4 p.m. 

Orientation and registration for new 
students 

New day students leave residence halls 
by 9 a.m. 

Residence halls open for returning stu- 
dents, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Registration in Gymnasium for return- 
ing students, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Last day for adding course or changing 
value of a course 

Last day for dropping course without 
receiving grade of Pass or Fail 

Midsemester; deficiency slips due in 
Registrar's Office 

Thanksgiving holiday begins at 2 p.m.; 
residence halls close at 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open at 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Preregistration in Gymnasium, 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Christmas holiday begins at 2 p.m.; resi- 
dence halls close at 3 p.m. 



I anuary 2, 1 uesday 
January 3, Wednesday 
January 22, Monday 
January 23, Tuesday 
January 30, Tuesday 



Residence halls open at 3 p.m. 
Classes resume 

Reading day prior to final examinations 
First semester examinations begin 
First semester ends 



1962 
January 31, Wednesday 

February 4, Sunday 

February 5, Monday 

February 6, Tuesday 
February 20, Tuesday 

March 6, Tuesday 

March 30, Friday 

April 13, Thursday 

April 23, Sunday 
April 24, Monday 
May 15, Tuesday 

May 28, Monday 
May 29, Tuesday 
June 6, Wednesday 
June 10, Sunday 



Second Semester 

Residence halls open lor new students, 
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

New students report for Orientation and 
preregistration, 9 a.m. 

Residence halls open for returning stu- 
dents, 1 p.m. 

Registration for returning students at 
the Gymnasium, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Last day for adding course or changing 
value of a course 

Last day for dropping course without 
receiving grade of Pass or Fail 

Midsemester; deficiency slips due in 
Registrar's Office 

Easter holiday begins at 2 p.m.; resi- 
dence halls close at 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open at 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Preregistration in the Gymnasium, 
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Reading day prior to final examinations 

Second semester examinations begin 

Second semester ends 

Baccalaureate Service at 10:30 a.m. 

Commencement at 2 p.m. 

Residence halls close at 6 p.m. 



LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 



1961 

September 5, Tuesday 
November 22, Wednesday 
November 27, Monday 
December 20, Wednesday 

1962 

January 3, Wednesday 
April 19, Thursday 
April 30, Monday 
June 8, Friday 



School opens 

Thanksgiving holiday begins 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Christmas holiday begins 2 p.m. 



Classes resume 

Easter holiday begins 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

School closes 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND TRUSTEES 
OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

President: Jerome Framptom, Jr., Federalsburg 

Vice-President: George C. Rhoderick, Jr., Middletown 

Secretary and State Superintendent of Schools: 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Members: Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Chevy Chase 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin, Aberdeen 

Dwight O. W. Holmes, Baltimore 

Richard Schifter, Bethesda 

William L. Wilson, Cumberland 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Earle T. Hawkins, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

Kenneth A. Browne, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean o£ Instruction 

Orrielle Murphy, Ed.D., Dean of Students 

Rebecca C. Tansil, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Hazel L. Bowman, M.A., Registrar 

Karl J. Moser, M.A., Business Manager 

Genevieve Heagney, Ed.D., Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

Nancy Lester, M.A., Director of Residence Halls 

Mariana H. Ward, B.S., Director of Health Service 

Dorothy W. Reeder, M.A., Librarian 

Ethel G. Gardner, Sc.D., Dietitian 

Odin Tidemand, Maintenance Superintendent 



INTRODUCING THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
AT TOWSON 1961 - 1962 

The State Teachers College at Towson is Maryland's oldest 
and largest teacher education institution. Its fine reputation in the 
field extends nationally. Towson is a four-year college, accredited 
by the Maryland State Board of Education, the Middle States As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. It has a well- 
qualified faculty of over a hundred members, increasing regularly 
with the growth of the student body, which now numbers 1600. 

The College is a part of the system of public education in the 
State. It is governed by the State Board of Education and is sup- 
ported almost entirely by legislative appropriations. 

While retaining completely the function for which it was 
founded — the preparation of teachers for the public schools of 
Maryland — Towson is now expanding to include a second func- 
tion, the offering of a four-year general, or liberal arts, program. 
This expansion, made necessary by the constantly increasing de- 
mand for general higher education in the area, continues a per- 
sistent trend in the growth of the College: in recent years the 
teacher-education program has been steadily "liberalized," allowing 
students wider and increased choice of elective courses; and in 1946 
the College inaugurated a junior college division with a curriculum 
comparable to that of the first two years of a liberal arts college. 



THE CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS 

Towson has an attractive 100-acre campus, located seven miles 
from downtown Baltimore on the York Road, one mile north of 
the City line and a half mile south of the main shopping area of 
Towson. 

Besides academic buildings there are three residence halls for 
women and two for men, a dining hall and a student center (with 
lounge, recreation room, and snack bar) connected with one of the 
residence halls, a health center (with physician on call and resi- 
dent registered nurse), and a campus elementary school used for 
observation, demonstration, and directed teaching. There are three 
athletic fields, an archery range, tennis courts, and a gymnasium 
used jointly by men and women. 

Of the academic buildings the library deserves special men- 
tion, not so much because it is a new, handsome, eminently func- 
tional building, but because its already respectable holdings are 
being purposefully and energetically increased— for a strong college 
is possible only with a strong library. 



OBJECTIVES 

The Teacher Education Program 

The central purpose of the college is to prepare the best pos- 
sible teachers for the public schools of Maryland. To this end, the 
teacher education program comprises a careful blend of cultural 
and professional offerings. The aim is to provide learning experi- 
ences through which students may acquire a broad cultural back- 
ground, professional knowledge and skills, and a philosophy of 
education. In fulfillment of this purpose, the faculty aims to help 
each student demonstrate progress in ability to: 

1. Practice the values of democracy, accepting the responsibil- 
ities as well as the privileges involved. 

2. Live by ethical principles and respect spiritual values. 

3. Acquire facts, develop understandings, skills, and appropri- 
ate attitudes in the various academic areas. 

4. Understand and use the general and special methods of 
inquiry of all the major disciplines. 

5. Learn and apply the contributions of the past, of all races, 
and other cultures. 

6. Gain increasing understanding of self and of human 
development. 

7. Know the materials for learning and the procedures for 
planning experiences to meet the needs of learners. 

8. Apply in teaching the principles that govern the learning 
process. 

9. Evaluate and record individual strengths and needs of 
learners. 

10. Organize time and daily living to foster physical and mental 
health. 

11. Go on learning continuously. 

The Arts and Sciences Program 

With the exception of those that relate to professional educa- 
tion, the objectives of the teacher education program apply to the 
liberal arts or arts and sciences progiam. 

ADMISSION 

Admission requirements include (1) graduation, with a better 
than average record, from an approved high school or preparatory 
school, or in lieu of this satisfactory scores on the equivalence 
examinations given through the State Department of Education; 
(2) recommendation by high school principal; and (3) satisfactory 
physical examination by college physician. Entrance tests are re- 



quired of all applicants; these are administered by the college and 
the results of these tests serve as additional bases for determining 
the applicant's eligibility for admission. 

All applicants must be citizens of the United States unless this 
requirement is waived by special permission of the State Board of 
Education, upon recommendation of the College. 

Details concerning admission and procedures for making appli- 
cation may be secured from the brochure "Admissions Procedures" 
which can be requested from the Admissions Office. 

EXPENSES 

Towson is essentially a scholarship college. The tuition for 
Maryland residents who enter the teacher-education program is 
paid by the State on the basis of the student's pledge to teach at 
least two years in the public schools of the State. Those in the 
liberal arts program pay a tuition of $200 a year. Out-of-state stu- 
dents in either program pay a tuition of $450 a year. All students 
pay student activities and athletic fees amounting to $41 The cost 
of books is $50 to $80 a year. 

Room and board in the college residence halls, available only 
to Maryland residents in the teacher-education program, living 
beyond the commuting area, costs only $312 a year. A limited 
number of liberal arts students may request off-campus housing 
and if approved these students may have meals in the college dining 
hall at a cost of $225 a year. 

College loan funds, Federal loans under the National Defense 
Act, and a few financial grants are available to both freshmen and 
upperclassmen. Full details concerning financial aid may be found 
in the brochure "College Expenses and Financial Aid" issued by 
the Committee on Financial Aid. 

THE PLEDGE TO TEACH IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND 

Every Maryland student applying for admission to the teacher- 
education program is required to sign the pledge to teach two years 
in Maryland immediately following graduation unless temporarily 
released by the State Board of Education. 

A student who for any reason cannot teach immediately upon 
graduation is expected to secure from the president of the college a 
deferment or a release. 

Deferments may be granted for periods of one or two years for 
reasons deemed valid by the president. A release from the pledge 
to teach is granted only in rare circumstances when it is obvious 
that fulfilling the pledge would be a virtual impossibility. 

A student who, upon graduation, does not teach and does not 
obtain a release or deferment shall have entered on his permanent 
record a statement that he is not entitled to honorable dismissal 
because of his failure to fulfill his obligation to the State. 



10 



STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 

A Student Life Council, consisting of faculty and students, 
coordinates the program, establishes policy, and handles cases re- 
ferred to it. The Council is responsible to the President of the 
College. College housing, the health program, the advisory system, 
orientation of new students, student activities, including publica- 
tions, clubs, and religious groups, vocational guidance, traffic, 
foods, the Student Centre, are all part of the student life progi'am. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Medical advice and office treatment are free to all students. 
The health center contains rooms for emergency use. In case of 
contagious diseases parents are notified and are required to remove 
the student from the campus for the duration of the disease. The 
college assumes no financial responsibility for illness of sufficient 
seriousness to require hospitalization, x-rays, or special treatment. 
The college does not assume financial responsibility for any injury 
incurred on the athletic field or in any physical education class. 

RESIDENCE HALL POLICIES 

Due to increasing enrollment and limited facilities for campus 
living, applications for residence hall space can be accepted only 
from students enrolled in the Teachers College program. Liberal 
Arts students who are not able to commute will be given assistance 
in securing rooms in college approved homes off campus and the 
privilege of taking their meals in the college dining hall. 

To qualify for living on the campus, a student must be single, 
enrolled in the Teachers College, and carrying a ininimum of 
twelve semester hours of credit. 

A married student whose husband or wife lives at a distance 
greater than 50 miles from the college may also be eligible for resi- 
dence living. A Housing Committee handles all exceptions on an 
individual basis. 

Single students under twenty-one years of age who live in off- 
campus housing other than their legal residence must live in col- 
lege approved homes. These students are responsible to the Direc- 
tor of Residence Halls and are expected to adhere to the rules and 
regulations of the residence councils. 

Priority for residence is given to the Teachers College student 
who resides beyond a twenty inile radius of State Teachers College 
at Towson. A student who resides beyond a twelve mile radius but 
within a twenty mile radius of the college may live in residence 
only if he lives beyond public transportation by one mile, or lives 
more than two hours away by existing public transportation. A 
student who resides within a twelve mile radius of State Teachers 
College at Towson is considered ineligible for residence. 



11 



Students who have reserved a room and entered a residence 
hall may withdraw to become day students only in case of change 
of residence, or student teaching in their home areas. An adjust- 
ment of fees is made in the Business Office for special cases. If 
vacancies occur in the halls during the year, students on the wait- 
ing list may be admitted according to their dates of application, 
commuting problems or other extenuating circumstances. 

All residence hall students are expected to leave the halls no 
later than twenty-four hours following their last examination at 
the end of each semester. (See college calendar for opening of 
residence halls.) 

Room Furnishings for Residence Students 

Each student will need at least four single sheets, one pair of 
blankets, pillows and pillow cases, spread, quilted pad for bed 
72 x 30 inches, towels, and two laundry bags. Bed linen and towels 
must have woven tags attached giving the student's full name. 

ACCIDENTAL INJURY REIMBURSEMENT 

For the benefit of those students who wish to participate, the 
college enters into an agreement with an approved insurance com- 
pany to cover the students against any accidental injury either at 
school or at home during the college year. Participation in the 
plan is voluntary and costs approximately $4.50 for women and 
$7.30 for men. Students desiring this coverage should make appli- 
cation at the Business Office. 

LIABILITY FOR UNPAID TUITION 

A Maryland student enrolled in the teachers college program 
pays no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the State. 

If he leaves before graduation and requests a transcript for the 
purpose of continuing his education in a college program which 
does not lead to teacher certification, he will be billed at the junior 
college tuition rate for the education he obtained at the college. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he 
transfers to a Maryland institution which has a teacher education 
program approved by the State Department of Education and if he 
reaffirms his pledge to teach for two years in the Maryland public 
schools upon graduation. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

A student withdrawing from the college must complete an 
official withdrawal card and file it in the Registrar's Office before he 
is entitled to any refund. Refunds are made on the following 
basis: 



12 



Day Students 

A day student who withdraws within two weeks after his 
initial registration is entitled to a refund of fees paid and to a 
refund of tuition for the semester minus ten dollars. After the two 
week period no fees are refunded and tuition is refunded only on 
a half-semester basis. 

Residence Students 

A residence student who withdraws from the college receives 
refunds for fees and tuition in accordance with the regulations for 
day students. The refvnid of payment for room and meals is subject 
to the following regulations: 

1. A residence student who withdraws within two weeks after 
the initial registration will be charged for one week in 
excess of his residence in the college. 

2. A student who withdraws at the request of the college after 
the first two weeks of any semester shall be charged for one 
week in excess of his residence in the college. 

3. A student who withdraws on his own or his guardian's 
initiative after the two weeks following registration and 
before mid-semester shall receive no refund of board or 
room for the first half of the semester. If the withdrawal 
occurs after the mid-semester, there will be no refund of 
board or room paid for the entire semester. 

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Although the curriculum is designed primarily for prospective 
teachers, it is weighted heavily with general or arts and sciences 
courses. Fifty-two semester hours of the latter are required of all 
students, whether in the teacher education or the arts and sciences 
program. Additional work in general education is required of 
prospective elementary school teachers, and all others will acquire 
depth of understanding by developing a major in one field. 

Specialization 

A major in academic fields is earned by completing about eight 
courses, generally, beyond the basic required courses in the chosen 
field— or about 35 credit hours of work, the exact amount being 
set by the various departments. Three possible benefits make the 
pursuit of a major course of study desirable: it prepares the stu- 
dent for graduate study in the field; it qualifies the graduate from 
the teacher-education program to teach the subject in junior and 
senior high school; it prevents a possible too-wide dispersion of 
effort which would result in a lack of real competency in any 
branch of knowledge. 



In some fields the college provides a specialization that is less 
intensive than is required for a major. This is referred to as an 
area of concentration and normally prepares the individual for 
certification to teach in that field. 

Students may select a major from one of the following fields: 
Biology, English, Elementary Education, Geography, History, and 
Mathematics. Areas of Concentration are available in Art, High 
School Science, Elementary School Science, Music, Psychology, 
Social Science, and Speech. Majors are being developed in these 
and other areas such as Physical Education and Modern Languages. 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements 
for graduation as set forth in the college catalogue. When the re- 
quirements are changed after a student has enrolled in the college, 
the student has the option of meeting in full the requirements that 
were in effect at the time of entrance or those that are in effect at 
the time of graduation. The student's adviser assists in the plan- 
ning of a program, but the final responsibility for meeting the 
requirements for graduation rests with the student. 

Degree Requirements 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements 
will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. College credit of one hundred twenty-eight semester hours. 

2. Credit in the courses required of all students. 

3. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has 
elected. 

4. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

5. Fulfillment of the speech requirement.* 

6. Certification by the college physician of physical fitness. 

7. Record of attendance at the college for at least one college 
year during which thirty semester hours of credit were 
earned. A student is expected to earn his final 30 credits 
at the college unless he receives special permission to the 
contrary. 

8. Demonstration of personal qualities which are expected of 
an educated person. 

Those wishing to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree may do 
so by fulfilling the above requirements and two years or the equi- 
valent of a modern foreign language. 



*Students luho are deficient in speech at any time after taking 
English 122, Fundamentals of Speech, are required to satisfy the 
requirement of English 100, Corrective Speech, before being 
recommended for graduation. 



14 



COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS 

For the B.S. Degree 

ART 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 

Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 122 2 credits 

English 204 3 credits 

American Literature 307 or 308 or 

English Literature 205 3 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Health Education 205 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 

Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 101-102 2 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 

General Psychology 201 3 credits 

SCIENCE 

Biological Science 4 credits 

Physical Science 4 credits 

Another course approved by the Department 4 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History of Western Civilization 121-122 or History 
of the United States 221-222, plus six hours of 
other social sciences 12 credits 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the College credit 

For the B.A. Degree 

The requirements for the B.S. Degree plus 12 hours or equi- 
valent in one foreign language. 

ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS 
IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
ART 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 



15 



MATHEMATICS 

General College Mathematics 205 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 201-202 2 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Geography 103-104 (il 6 hours have not been taken 

in the 12 hours of social science requirements.). 6 credits 

THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The supply of Towson graduates does not come close to meet- 
ing the demand for them. This in part reflects the current national 
shortage of teachers; it also reflects a special regard for Towson 
graduates in school systems throughout the State. 

Towson has been preparing teachers for the public schools of 
Maryland for over ninety years. Out of this long experience have 
come the present three programs for teachers, directed toward 
three grade-levels: kindergarten-primary (through the third grade), 
elementary (first through sixth grades), and secondary (seventh 
through twelfth grades). The necessary variations among them lie 
mainly in the required professional courses— that is, those courses 
concerned with understanding children, educational theory, and 
classroom techniques. 

These professional courses, comprising about twenty per cent 
of the four years' work, consist of roughly two-thirds classwork at 
the College and one-third experiences, including directed teaching, 
in the classrooms of neighboring public school systems. 

The remaining work is given over to studies of a general na- 
ture—in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sci- 
ences—providing a well-rounded college education, as well as neces- 
sary background in the subject the student will eventually teach. 
Certain basic courses are required, assuring foundations in all 
broad areas of knowledge; but even among these there are frequent 
choices, and beyond them is the opportunity for electives that 
make possible the pursuit of special interests. 

Successful completion of one of the three teacher-education 
programs assures certification by the State Board of Education to 
teach in the counties of the State for four years. Certification is 
renewable upon evidence of successful performance. Certification 
to teach in Baltimore City is based in part upon the passing of a 
professional examination. 



16 



COURSES REQUIRED IN EDUCATION 

Kindergarten-Primary Division 

Introduction to Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

Professional Block 1 6 

Professional Block II 3 

Professional Block III 5 

Directed Teaching 390 10 

Foundations of Education 410 2 



Elementary Division 

Introduction To Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

The Teaching of Arithmetic 363 2 

Overview of Education 392 2 

*Art or Music or Physical Education Methods 

(Two are to be taken) 4 

The Child and His Curriculum 360 6 

Directed Teaching 390 10 

Foundations of Education 410 2 



Secondary Division 

Introduction To Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

Principles of Secondary Education 381 3 

Methods in Major Subject 383, 384, 386, 387, 451 2 

Audio-Visual Laboratory 391 1 

Foundations of Education 410 2 

Directed Teaching 390 10 



^Students in Elejuentary Education will he assigned to two of the 
three methods courses in Art, Music, or Physical Education after 
an analysis of their individual needs. Students majoring in Ele- 
mejitary Education will take the third of these methods courses 
as a requirement for the B.S. degree. 



17 



SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

The prescribed sequence o£ courses for the degree in Kinder- 
garten-Primary, Elementary, and Secondary School Education are 
outlined on the following pages. No deviations are permitted ex- 
cept at the recommendation of the Admissions and Standards Com- 
mittee. Students in the Kindergarten-Primary, Elementary, and 
Secondary School divisions will be assigned to Program A or Pro- 
gram B and are expected to adhere to that program. Transfer 
students and others unable to meet graduation requirements under 
the regular programs are urged to plan curriculum patterns during 
the first semester at the college in conference with the director of 
their professional division. 

Sequence of Courses For the Program of 
KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION** 

FRESHMAN YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

*Science 4 

30.121, 103, or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives*** or Major 

Courses 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design.. 2 
5.105 Introduction to 

Teaching 1 

6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.122, 104, or 222 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 or 7 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

30.103 Geography or History... 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.104 Geography or History ... 3 
Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR— PROGRAM A (Kindergarten-Primary) 



Semester I 



hours 
6 



5.333 Professional Block I... 
20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

5.334 Professional Block II 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

5.334 Professional Block III. 

5.390 Student Teaching 

Total 



Semester II 
hours hours 

5 5.410 Foundations of Education. 2 
10 6.205, 307 or 308 Literature ... 3 

15 *Science 4 

Electives and Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design.. 2 
6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.103, 121, or 221 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

5.105 Introduction to Teaching. 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Pubhc Speaking 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

♦Science 4 

30.104, 122, or 222 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

5.333 Professional Block 1 6 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Elective to 2 

Total 15 to 17 



19 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 



hours 
3 



5.334 Professional Block II . . 
11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

*Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 11 

5.335 Professional Block 
5.390 Student Teaching 
Total 



III 



hours 

5 

.. 10 

15 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 



Semester II 



hours 
2 

2 
3 



hours 

4 



♦Science 

30.122, 222, or 104 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



1.203 Art in the Culture 

5.401 Foundations of Education 
6.205, 306, or 308 Literature . . . 
30.121, 221, or 103 History or 

Geography 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 

* Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be sup- 
plied by faculty advisers. 

** Students who are interested in a concentration in Elementary or Kinder- 
garten-Primary education may apply to the director of this division for 
details and requirements. 

*** Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language 
or a course needed for a major is preferred. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before com- 
pleting freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a 
course in the department. 

Sequence of Courses For the Program of 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION** 

FRESHMAN YEAR-PROGRAM A 

Semester I Semester II 

hours hours 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design. . 2 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching. 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.122, 222, or 104 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives*** 6 or 7 

Total 16 or 17 



0.101 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121, 221, or 103 History or 

Geography 3 

*Science 4 

Electives*** 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic .. 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

30.103 Geography or History ... 3 

Electives*** 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 



hours 
2 



1.203 Art in the Culture 

8.205 Health 2 

11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.104 Geography or History .... 3 

Electives*** to 2 

Total 15 to 17 



20 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A (Elementary) 



Semester I 



i.363 
).370 



5.392 
20.203 



hours 
2 



Mathematics Methods . . . 
Art or Music or Physical 
Education Methods 

(Take 2) 4 

Overview of Education . , 2 
Human Growth & 

Learning 3 

Electives*** 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



).360 
;.390 



Semester 11 



Curriculum 

Student Teaching 
Total 



hours 

6 

. . 10 

16 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

hours 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

♦Science 4 

Electives*** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 11 

hours 
5.410 Foundations of Education. 2 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives*** 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester 1 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design. . 2 
6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121, 103 or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives*** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 11 

hours 
5.105 *Introduction to 

Teaching 1 

6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

♦Science 4 

30.122, 104, or 222 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives*** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester 1 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic. . . 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.103 Geography or History ... 3 

Electives*** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



Semester 11 

hours 
11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.203 Human Growth & 

Learning 3 

30.104 Geography or History .... 3 

Electives*** 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 1 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives* *♦ 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B 

Semester 11 



hours 
5.392 Overview of Education . . 2 

6.205, 307 or 308 Literature 3 

5.363 Mathematics Methods .... 2 
5.370 Art, Music, or Physical 
Education Methods 

(Take 2) 4 

Electives*** 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



21 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B (Elementary) 
Semester 1 



5.3GO Curriculum 

5.390 Student Teaching 
Total 



Semester 11 
hours hours 

... 6 5.410 Foundations of Education 2 

... 10 *Science 4 

16 Electives*** 9 or 10 

Total 15 or 16 

* Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be 
supplied by faculty advisers. 

** Students who are interested in a concentration in Kindergarten-Primary or 
Elementary education may apply to the director of this division for details 
and requirements. 

*** Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language 
or a course needed for a major is preferred. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before com- 
pleting freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a 
course in the department. 



Sequence of Courses For the Program of 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester 1 



hours 




0.101 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

IG.lOl Physical Education 1 

♦History 3 

Electives*** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 11 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching. 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

*Science 4 

*History 3 

Electives*** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM A 



Semester I 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic . . 3 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

Electives and Major 

Courses 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

6.204 English Literature 3 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives and Major 

Courses 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A 

Semester 1 



hours 
5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Education 3 

*Science 4 

♦Social Science 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 5 to 7 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester 11 

hours 

5.391 Directed Teaching 10 

*Methods 2 

5.451 Audio- Visual 1 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



22 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM A (Secondary) 
Semester I Semester II 



hours 
5.401 Foundations of Education. 2 

♦Science 4 

*Social Science 3 

Electives*** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 

FRESHMAN YEAR- 
Semester I 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

*Science 4 

*History 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

Electives*** 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



hours 

♦Literature 3 

Electives*** 12 to 14 



Total 



PROGRAM B 

Semester II 



15 to 17 



hours 



5.105 



Introduction to 

Teaching 1 

6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

*History 3 

Electives 6 or 7 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

6.204 English Literature 3 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic .. 3 
20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 



hours 
3 
4 



♦Social Science 

♦Science 

Electives or Major 

Courses 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

*Literature 3 

5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Education 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PROGRAM B 



Semester I 

hours 

5.390 Directed Teaching 10 

5.451 Audio- Visual 1 

♦Methods 2 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 



hours 
. 3 
4 



♦Social Science 

♦Science 

5.410 Foundations of 

Education 2 

Electives 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 

* Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be 
supplied by faculty advisers. 

** Students who are interested in a concentration in Elementary or Kinder- 
garten-Primary education may apply to the director of this division for 
details and lequirements. 

♦♦* Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language 
or a course needed for a major is preferred. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before com- 
pleting freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a 
course in the department. 



23 



THE PROGRAM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Towson is developing its arts and sciences or liberal arts pro- 
gram to be comparable to that of any standard liberal arts college. 
As in the teacher-education program, certain basic courses are re- 
quired, but the student has much freedom of selection. The gradu- 
ate is prepared to enter graduate or professional schools if that is 
the goal, or to enter one of the innumerable lines of work open to 
well-educated people (such as applied science, business, communi- 
cations, dramatics,, government service, personnel work, politics, 
transportation) which interest, aptitude, and opportunity may 
suggest. 

For some professions, such as law and medicine, it is usually 
advisable to complete a four-year liberal arts course before begin- 
ning professional study. For others, like engineering, students 
should plan to transfer to a professional school after one or two 
years unless the professional school's admission plan permits a 
longer period of pre-professional study. 

Suggested First Year Program 

The following courses are suggested for the first year of a 
program of arts and sciences. This play may be varied upon con- 
sultation with advisers in the light of the student's vocational 
objective: 

English Composition and Literature, 6 semester hours; History 
of Western Civilization, 6; Biological Science or Physical Science, 
8; Art in the Culture, Music Appreciation, or Health Education, 2; 
Fundamentals of Public Speaking, 2; Physical Education, 2; Orien- 
tation, 0; and Electives, 6 or 7. A foreign language should be elected 
by those wishing to earn a B.A. rather than a B.S. degree and by 
those who have studied a foreign language in high school and wish 
to continue it in college. 

Students may be interested in a field such as mathematics, 
which requires that the work be started in the freshman year; if so 
they should see their adviser about including a course in this de- 
partment in the freshman year. 

The liberal arts student will, before the end of his freshman 
or sophomore year ordinarily, choose a field for concentrated study 
(biology, history, or literature, for example) and with the aid of 
his faculty adviser develop a coherent program to be pursued dur- 
ing the remaining years of study. This major field will in many 
cases be dictated by occupational goals, but the first aim of con- 
centrated study is not preparation for a s])ecific occupation; it is 
to provide the important experience of extensive and intensive 
inquiry into a field of knowledge and the deep satisfaction that 
derives from being, even in a modest way, an authority in that field. 
And these are benefits to be prized by any intellectually inclined 
person, regardless of his professional interest. 

24 






~^9^ 



Sophomores in Spring 




A Towson Graduate with her First Group of 
Children 



25 



CHANGING PROGRAMS 

Because the teacher-education and arts and sciences programs 
are similar in their first two years of work and because of the flexi- 
bility afforded by the elective portion of the teacher-education pro- 
gram, transfer from arts and sciences to teacher-education without 
loss of time or credit is usually possible at the end of either the 
freshman or sophomore year. 

Transfer from teacher-education to arts and sciences is also 
possible, but for Maryland residents this entails reimbursement to 
the State in the amount of $100 for each semester of work com- 
pleted in the teacher-education program. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

The college calendar, which will be found on pages and , 
indicates the dates when students must register. Students are not 
permitted to attend classes without having completed registration, 
and a fee is assessed for registration after the time assigned (see 
Expenses, page ). In addition to payment of the fee, students 
who register later than one week after the first day of classes must 
secure permission from the Committee on Admissions and 
Standards. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal student load is 15 to 17 semester hours of credit 
each semester. Permission to deviate from these hours may be 
sought from the Dean of Students. Approval for a reduced load is 
often granted for appropriate personal reasons. Permission is 
usually granted for 18 semester hours if the student has a cumula- 
tive average of 2.50 and for 19 hours if the average is 3.00 or 
better. 

Students who are on academic probation, who have health 
problems, or who are carrying heavy programs of work outside of 
the college may be required by the Dean of Students to carry less 
than a normal load of classes. Blanks for requesting permission to 
carry fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained in the 
Registrar's Office. 

AUDITING COURSES 

With the consent of the instructor, a student may request per- 
mission to audit a course in which he has a particular interest. If 
the auditing of the course will not constitute an excessive load, per- 
mission is granted by the Dean of Instruction for the student to 
register as an auditor. No credit is to be earned in courses which 
are audited. 



26 



CHANGE OF COURSE OR SCHEDULE 

The Dean of Instruction approves requests for course changes 
during the first week; thereafter, requests for changes are made to 
the Dean of Students. Under no circumstances may course changes 
be made after the end of the third week of the class. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified according to the number of semester 
hours completed as follows: freshmen, 0-30 semester hours; sopho- 
mores, 30-60 semester hours; junior, 60-90 semester hours; senior, 
above 90 semester hours. 

MARKING AND POINT SYSTEM 

The five-point marking system used, with the numerical points 
assigned to each grade, is as follows: 

A, 4 points 

B, 3 points 

C, 2 points 

D, 1 point 

F , points (failure) There are no plus or minus grades. 

The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in 
that course, then totaling the credit hours and points for all courses 
taken in the semester, and dividing the total number of points by 
the total number of hours of credit. For example, a student receives 
these grades on the cards enclosed: 

A in I course of 4 hours credit 

B in 1 course of 3 hours credit and in 1 course of 1 hour credit 

C in 1 course of 3 hours credit 

D in 1 course of 3 hours credit 

F in 1 course of 2 hours credit 

The computation would be as follows: 

4 hours of A (4 points each) 16 points 

4 hours of B (3 points each) 12 points 

3 hours of C (2 points each) 6 points 

3 hours of D (1 point each) 3 points 

2 hours of F (0 points each) points 

16 Total hours 37 Total points 

Dividing 37 by 16, the student's grade-point average for this 
semester is found to be 2.31. 

A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required for gradua- 
tion. An average of better than 3.00 is usually worthy of special 
mention. 



27 



STANDARDS OF WORK REQUIRED 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain at least 
the following cumulative averages: Freshmen, 1.70; Sophomore, 
1.80; Juniors, 1.90; Seniors, 2.00. Students are placed on probation 
when the cumulative average is below the minimum standard for 
their class. 

Probation indicates uncertainty on the part of the college as 
to the student's probable success. Probation is lifted when the stu- 
dent shows satisfactory improvement in his work. A probationary 
student who fails to show such improvement may be asked to leave 
the college. A student on strict probation is required to withdraw 
at the end of that term unless a substantial improvement in the 
grade-point average is attained. The complete records of such stu- 
dents are reviewed by the Committee on Admissions and Standards 
at the close of each semester. 

Failure in a course usually delays graduation from the college, 
fiowever, a student may attend a summer session here or with the 
permission of the Committee on Admissions and Standards attend 
elsewhere and transfer the earned credit to the college. As a rule a 
student may not rej^eat a course more than once. 

Students in the liberal arts program who expect to transfer 
to another institution with advanced standing should maintain 
gi'ades of C or higher in each course attempted, since, ordinarily, 
institutions of higher learning do not accept courses in which a 
giade of less than C has been earned. 

Entering students who are defective in speech and/or hearing 
are referred to the Speech Division for testing and required to take 
a course in Corrective Speech. 

Freshmen are required to take a course in Fundamentals of 
Public Speaking. Exemption from the required course is granted if 
the student passes a performance test given by two members of the 
Speech Division. The performance test must be taken before the 
end of the first week of the course in Fundamentals of Speech. 
Those who thus qualify for exemption may choose an advanced 
course in speech or an elective in another field! 

Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking 
English 122, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, are required to 
satisfy the requirement of English 100, Corrective Speech, before 
being recommended for graduation. 

In general, a student is ready to enter the block of professional 
courses when: (a) he has met the orientation and speech require- 
ments, (b) he has completed all required freshmen and sophomore 
courses (totaling at least 60 hours) with an average of 1.80 or 
higher, (c) he has cleared any failing grades in required courses 
from his record, and (d) he has received the recommendation of 



28 



the director oi his division. Deviations from these requirements 
may be made only with the approval of the Committee on Admis- 
sions and Standards. 

A student in the elementary or kindergarten-primary program 
who makes more than one D grade in professional courses during 
the semester preceding student teaching will not be permitted to 
enter student teaching. If the student is allowed to remain in the 
college, he must repeat the professional courses in which he received 
D grades. 

In order to be eligible to enter student teaching a student must 
have earned a minimum cumulative average of 1.80. 

The personal development of each student is considered. // 
the Comynittee on Admissions and Standards is convinced that a 
student does not Jiave the qualifications necessary for teaching, he 
may he asked at any time to withdraw from the college. 

ATTENDANCE 

A student-faculty attendance committee, responsible to the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards, administers the college 
attendance policy. 

The college attendance policy places responsibility on the stu- 
dent for attending classes and for filing reasons for absence from 
classes. Students should file within 48 hours after their return to 
college, on the official blank, a record of each absence except those 
for college-sponsored events. A record of absence for medical rea- 
sons will be filed at the Health Center. A record of absence for 
personal reasons will be filed at Stephens Hall in Room 109. 

No absences are permitted on the day preceding or the day fol- 
lowing a holiday except by prior approval of the Attendance Com- 
mittee. No absences from final examinations are permitted except 
by prior approval of the Attendance Committee. Absences from 
examinations because of emergency illness or accident should be 
reported to the Office of the Dean of Students immediately by tele- 
phone. All students are reminded that semester examinations are 
scheduled on Saturdays and that unexcused absence from a final 
examination constitutes a failure. 

LENGTH OF ATTENDANCE 

Only in unusual cases may a student remain in the college for 
longer than eight semesters. Any requests for deviation from this 
plan must be submitted to the Admissions and Standards Commit- 
tee a month prior to the end of a semester. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A student wishing to withdraw should see the Dean of Stu- 
dents, who will provide the form needed to make the withdrawal 
official. 



29 



TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of a student's record will be sent to other educa- 
tional institutions and organizations only upon written request of 
the student concerned. The first transcript is issued free of charge. 
A charge of one dollar is made for each subsequent transcript and 
should be enclosed with the request. A supplement of one semes- 
ter's work only will be furnished for fifty cents. Upon a student's 
graduation a transcript is sent to the Maryland State Department 
of Education. When requested, transcripts are sent to the Balti- 
more City Department of Education. No charge is made at any 
time for transcripts sent to either of these departments in Maryland. 
One copy of the student's record marked "not an official transcript" 
is furnished free to the student upon graduation. At any time, a 
student may have an official copy on written request and payment 
of one dollar. It is not the policy of the college to issue official 
transcripts directly to students and graduates. 

A student who withdraws from the teacher-education program 
before graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose of con- 
tinuing his college education must first reimburse the college for 
whatever education he has received tuition-free (see Liability For 
Unpaid Tuition page 12). 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THE MEANING OF COURSE NUMBERS 

Each department of the college has a code number, shown in 
parentheses at the head of the department announcement. 
Each course has a distinctive number, with the following sig- 
nificance: Courses numbered 100-199 inclusive are primarily 
for freshmen, 200-299 primarily for sophomores, 300-399 pri- 
marily for juniors, and 400-499 primarily for seniors. Stu- 
dents may register for courses one level above or one level 
below their classification. Seniors are expected to confine 
themselves to 300 courses and higher, unless the curriculum 
pattern for the degree specifies particular 200 courses in the 
senior year. 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a 
hyphen are to be taken in sequence throughout a year. When 
course numbers are separated by a corntna, either semester may 
be taken independently of the other. 

"a" COURSES 

For all courses numbered with the addition of the letter "a" 
the following explanation applies: for the additional credit 
hour, students are required to do extra work in areas of special 
interest under direction of the instructor. 

Permission to register for any course carrying the letter "a" 



30 



must be obtained from the instructor of the course at registra- 
tion time only. A student electing the additional hour credit 
may not change the value of the course after the second week 
of the semester. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Students majoring in the various areas will need to choose 
their electives with extreme care. Before registering for 
courses which are not required consult with your adviser. 
The advice of the instructor in the course or the chairman of 
the department in which the elective course is listed may need 
to be sought before a wise decision is made concerning the 
choice of an elective. 

TIME OF OFFERING 

A course is offered every semester of every year, unless the 
semester or the semester and year of offering is specified. All 
non-required courses are offered subject to sufficient enroll- 
ment. 

CREDIT VALUE OF COURSES 

The figure in parentheses following the title indicates the sem- 
ester credit value of the course. 

Non-Departmental Courses 

101 Orientation to the Teachers College (0) 

102 Orientation to Liberal Arts College (0) 

103 Orientation for Transfer Students (0) 
401 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

ART 

Mr. David Guillaume, Mr. Lloyd Miller, Mr. Samuel Nass, 
Mr. Stanley Pollack (Chairman), Mrs. Lenora Schwartz, Dr. Mil- 
dred Zindler.* 

Courses in the practice and understanding of the visual arts. 
An area of concentration may be used for certification in Art Edu- 
cation for those who wish to teach Art. 
103 Fundamentals of Design (2) 

203 Art in the Culture (2) 

210 Drawing and the Appreciation of Drawing (2) 

304 Graphics (2) Semester II, 1963-64 



^For each department, these are the names of individuals on the 
teaching staff the first semester of the 1960-61 year. 



31 



305 The Art of Puppetry and Marionette Production (2) 

Semester I, 1963-64 

306 Architectural Concepts (2) Semester II, 1962-63 
310 Three Dimensional Design (2) Semester I, 1962-63 
310a Three Dimensional Design (3) Semester I, 1962-63 
314 The Art of Enameling on Metal (2) 

320 Exhibition Techniques (2) 

321 The History of Art: Ancient Through Renaissance (2) 

Semester II, 1963-64 

322 History of Art: Baroque Through Contemporary (2) 
325 Advertising Design and Commercial Art (2) 
329-330 Painting (3) each semester 

331-332 Ceramics (2) each semester Semester I, 1962-63 

340-341 Sculpture (3) each semester Semester II, 1962-63 

414,415 Special Art Problems (2 to 4) each semester 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Robert Abendroth, Miss Alma Bent, Miss Ella Bramblett, 
Dr. Maud Broyles, Mr. Grayson Burrier, Miss Ann Cimino, Mr. 
David Cornthwaite, Dr. Regina Fitzgerald, Dr. William Hartley 
(Chairman), Mr. Richard Nelson, Dr. James A. Phillips, Dr. Ruby 
Shubkagle, Mr. Carlton Sprague, Mrs. Zenith Velie. 

Faculty members from other departments participate in teach- 
ing the education courses. 

The teacher-education program provides many opportunities 
for students to work with and study children. Professional labora- 
tory experiences begin in the freshman year and are an integral 
part of the work of each of the succeeding years. 

Common Required Courses 
090 Improvement of Reading (0) (for selected students) 

105 Introduction to Teaching (1) 

410 Foundations of Education (2) 

390 Directed Teaching (10) 

Required Courses in Kindergarten and Primary Education 

333 Professional Block I (6) 

334 Professional Block II (3) 

335 Professional Block III (5) (Accompanies student teaching) 

Required Courses in Elementary Education 

363 Arithmetic in the Elementary School (2) 

364 The Teaching of Reading and Other Areas of the Lan- 

guage Arts in the Elementary School (3) 
In accordance with his previous background, each student is re- 
quired to take two of the following three courses: 

371 Art and the Child (2) 

372 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (2^ 



The Teaching ot Physical Education in the Elementary 
School (2) 

Overview ol Elementary Education (2) 

The Teaching of Science and Social Studies in the Ele- 
mentary School (3) 

Differentiated Student Teaching Experiences (4 to 8) 

Physical Education in the Elementary School (3) 

Advanced Art Education (3) 

Reading and the Language Arts in the Elementary 
School— Advanced Course (2) 

Music in the Elementary School— Advanced Course (3) 

Seminar in the Teaching ol Arithmetic (3) 

Seminar in Elementary School Science (3) 

Required Courses in Secondary Education 

Principles of Secondary Education (3) 
Principles of Secondary Education (4) 
Language Arts in the Secondary School (2) 
The Teaching of Science in the Secondary School (2) 
The Teaching of Social Studies in the 
Secondary School (2) 

385 Measurement in the Secondary School (2) 

386 The Teaching of English in the Secondary School (2) 

387 The Teaching of Mathematics in the 

Secondai~y School (2) 
379 Guidance in the Public School: Secondary (2) 

391 Audio-Visual Laboratory (1) 

395 Physical Education Activities for the 

Secondary School (2) 
402 Juvenile Literature (3) 

451 Core Techniques in the Junior High School (2) 

Elective Courses in Education 

315 Audio- Visual Materials and Methods of Instruction (3) 

331 History of Education (3) 

401 Children's Literature (3) 

405 Field Studies on the Child and His Community (2) 

426 Methods and Principles of Reading Instruction- 

Advanced (2) 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Edward Bevins (Chairman), Dr. Arthur Brewington, Mrs. 
Thelma Brewington, Dr. Eunice Crabtree, Mr. Frank Guess, Mr. 
Paul Hanson, Dr. Marjorie Henry, Miss Nina Hughes, Mr. William 
Kramer, Dr. John Lewis, Mr. W. E. Page, Dr. Marion Sargent, 
Mrs. Julia Sawyer, Dr. June Thearle, Mr. Vernon Wanty, Mr. 
Phineas Wright. 



33 



The English program provides the student with experiences 
in the appreciation of hterature, present and past, and affords 
opportunities for self-expression in written and spoken forms. 
090 Remedial English (0) (For selected students) 

Literature 
102-103 Composition and Introduction to Literature (3) 
each semester 

204 English Literature (3) 

205 English Literature (3) 

224 The Short Story (2) 

225 American Biography (2) 
231 Advanced Exposition (2) 
233 Elements of Poetry (2) 

307 American Literature (3) 

308 American Literature (3) 

315 Shakespeare (3) Semester 1, 1962-63 

316 Shakespeare (3) Semester II, 1961-62 

319 Contemporary Poetry (3) Semester I, 1961-62 

320 Contemporary Novel (3) Semester II, 1961-62 

321 Contemporary Drama (3) Semester II, 1961-62 

323 The Development of the American Novel (2), Semester I, 

1962-63 

324 The Development of the English Drama (3) 

Semester I, 1961-62 
326 Classical Mythology (2) 

328 History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 

Semester I, 1961-62 
332 Advanced Grammar (2) 

333, 334 Readings in World Literature (3), (3) 
383 Imaginative Writing (3) 

384-385 Newswriting (3) each semester 
405 History of Criticism (3) 

422 The Development of the English Novel (3) Semester I, 

1961-62 
430 History of the English Language (3) Semester II 

440 Seminar in English Studies (3) 

Speech and Drama 

091 Corrective Speech (0) (For selected students) 

122 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2) 

218 Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

220 Oral Interpretation (3) Semester II 

300 Speech Correction— Principles and Methods (3) 

Semester I 

302 Voice and Diction (2) Semester I, 1962-63 

304 Advanced Oral Interpretation (3) Semester II, 1962-63 

327 Phonetics of American English (3) 



34 



374 Acting (2) Semester II 

375 Play Directing (3) Semester I 

376 Techniques of Make-Up for Dramatic Productions (1) 

Semester II 

377 Stagecraft (3) Semester I 

379 Children's Theater (2) Semester II 

450 Clinical Practice in Speech Correction (2 or 4) 

Semester II 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Dr. Corinne Bize, (Chairman), Dr. Katharine Gilcoyne, Mr. 
Carl Reitenbach, Miss Marian Ward. 

The Health Education courses deal with the basic needs of 
the human organism for healthy growth and development. 

205 Health Education (2) not offered 1961-62 

305 Current Health Problems (2) 

310 Principles and Practices in Public Health (3) 

320 Advanced First Aid (1) 

405 School Health Materials (2) 

MATHEMATICS 

Miss Allene Archer, Mr. Robert Beckey, Dr. Gerson Miller, Dr. 
Marvin Volpel (Chairman), Miss Margaret Zipp. 

The mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for stu- 
dents to deepen and strengthen their understanding of the basic 
concepts of mathematics, explore the areas where mathematics is 
essential in everyday living, develop an appreciation of the role 
mathematics has played in the development of our civilization, and 
profit from the discipline it develops. 

105 Business Mathematics (3) Semester I 

106 Mathematics of Finance (3) Semester II 

107 Trigonometry (3) 

110 Intermediate Algebra (3) Semester I 

111 College Algebra (3) 

112 Analytic Geometry (3) Semester II 

202 Introduction to Statistics (3) Semester I 

204 Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic (3) 

205 General College Mathematics (3) 
210 Basic Statistics (2) 

223-224 Calculus, Differential and Integral (3) each Semester 

331 College Geometry (3) alternate years 

333 Theory of Equations (3) alternate years 

335 Intermediate Calculus (3) alternate years 

401 Probability and Statistical Inference (3) Semester II 

431 Concepts of Modern Mathematics (2) Semester I 

431a Concepts of Modern Mathematics (3) Semester I 



35 



MODERN LANGUAGE 

Dr. Rebecca Tansil, Mr. Ernst von Schwerdtner (Chairman). 

Foreign languages are open as electives to all students in the 
college. In addition, the completion of the intermediate or second 
year course, or its equivalent, is required of all candidates for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. 

121-122 French Elements (6) two semesters 

221-222 Intermediate French (3) two semesters 

111-112 German Elements (6) two semesters 

211-212 Intermediate German (6) two semesters 

101-102 Spanish Elements (6) two semesters 

201-202 Intermediate Spanish (6) two semesters 

Advanced Language courses 

According to demand, the following courses on the advanced 
level may be given: French 321, German 311, and Spanish 301 — 
Novel and Short Story; French 322, German 312, and Spanish 302— 
Drama and Poetry; French 323, German 313, and Spanish 303— 
History of Literature with collateral reading of the French, Ger- 
man, or Spanish classical authors, in the original. (3) for each 
course. 

French 324, German 314, and Spanish 304— Advanced Conver- 
sation (2) for each course. 

French 325, German 315, and Spanish 305— Advanced Composi- 
tion (1) for each course. 

MUSIC 

Mr. Clifford Alper, Mr. John Bollinger, Mrs. Esther Coulange, 
Mr. John Duro (Chairman), Mr. Charles Haslup, Miss Emma 
Weyforth. 

The music program aiins to acquaint students with music, as 
consumers, through hearing it and reading about it; and as pro- 
ducers, through singing and playing. An area of concentration 
may be used for certification in Music Education for those whc 
wish to teach music. 

103 Music Appreciation (2) 

203 Music Fundamentals (2) 

205 Class Voice (1) 

209-210 Glee Club (1) 

215-216 Orchestra (1) 

217-218 Men's Chorus (1) 

307 Twentieth Century Music (2) 

308 Instrumental Class Ensemble (2) 
313 American Music (2) 



36 



314 Class Piano (1) 

315 History of Music (2) 

316 Choral and Instrumental Conducting (3) 

317 Sight Singing and Ear Training (3) 
318-319 Harmony (3) 

320 Choral and Instrumental Methods and Materials (3) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Corinne Bize (Chairman), Mrs. Marjorie Bleul, Miss Jane 
Daniels, Dr. Katharine Gilcoyne, Miss Carolyn Graeser, Mr. Earl 
Killian, Mr. Robert Melville, Dr. Donald Minnegan, Miss Mary 
Roach. 

The physical education program provides tor the development 
of skills and understandings for satisfying participation in sports 
and informed spectatorsliip, and development of interest in active 
outdoor recreation. A major field of study is being developed. 
101-102 Physical Education (1) each semester 
201-202 Physical Education (1) each semester 

Individual Gymnastics (part of 101-102) 

110 Introduction to Physical Education (2) 

210-211 Curriculum Construction in Physical Edtication (2) 

each semester 
310 Recreation (3) Semester I 

410 Rhythms and Dancing (2) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Cleo Ammen, Dr. Donald Cassatt, Dr. Harold Moser, Dr. 
Edward Neulander (Coordinator), Dr. Harvey Saxton, Mr. Neil 
Wilson. 

Psychology as a science is concerned with the overall adjust- 
ments of organisms to their environment. The psychology pro- 
grams offered in this college are designed to promote growth in the 
understanding, prediction, and control of human behavior. 

201 General Psychology (3) 

202 Experimental Psychology (3) Semester I 

203 Human Growth and Learning (3) 
206 Psychology of Adjustment (3) 

307 Psychology of Adolescence (3) 

308 Psychology of Learning (3) Semester II 

322 Social Psychology (3) Semester I 

323 Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3) 

402 Measurement and Evaluation (3) Semester I 

403 Motivation and Emotion (2) Semester I 
403a Motivation and Emotion (3) Semester I 



37 



404 Psychology of Individual Differences (3) Semester II 

405 Personality (3) Semester I 

420 Mental Hygiene (3) Semester II 

502 Systems of Psychology (2) Semester II 
502a Systems of Psychology (3) Semester II 

503 Seminar in Selected Problems in Psychology (3) 

SCIENCE 

Dr. John Bareham, Mr. Maynard Bowers, Dr. Louis Cox, Mr. 
Compton Crook, Dr. Howard Erickson, Dr. Wilfred Hathaway, 
Mrs. Caryl Lewis, Mr. William Moorefield, Dr. Lois Odell, Dr. 
William Pelham (Chairman), Mr. Edward Rubendall, Dr. Kenneth 
Stringer, Mr. Allan Walker, Mr. Arthur Yarbrough. 

General Courses 

103 Fundamentals of Biology (4) 

207 Physical Science I (4) 

208 Physical Science II (4) 

Courses in Biology 

210 Invertebrate Zoology (4) Semester I 

211 General Botany (4) not offered 1961-62 

212 Field and Systematic Botany (4) Semester II 

213 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) not offered 1961-62 

214 General Zoology (4) not offered 1961-62 

215 Vertebrate Zoology (8) two semesters Semester II 
304 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (4) 

not offered 1961-62 

314 Ornithology (2) not offered 1961-62 
314a Ornithology (3) not offered 1961-62 

315 Entomology (2) not offered 1961-62 
315a Entomology (3) not offered 1961-62 
318 Microbiology (4) Semester I 

325 Histology and Microtechnique (4) not offered 1961-62 

326 Gentics (3) not offered 1961-62 

327 Animal Physiology (4) not offered 1961-62 

328 Comparative Plant Anatomy (4) not offered 1961-62 

329 Economic Botany (3) not offered 1961-62 
401 Biological Literature (2) not offered 1961-62 
501 Selected General Principles in Biology (3) 

not offered 1961-62 

Courses in Chemistry 

206-207 General Chemistry (4) two semesters 

208 Brief Organic Chemistry (4) not offered 1961-62 

200 Quantitative Analysis (4) Semester I 



38 



Courses in Physics 

211-212 General Physics (8) two semesters 

402 Introduction to Modern Physics (3) not offered 1961-62 

Courses in Earth Science 
320 General Astronomy (2) Semester II 

320a General Astronomy (3) Semester II 

324 Geomorphology (3) Semester II 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

300 Physical Science III (3) not offered 1961-62 

310 Field Natural Science (2) Semester II 

310a Field Natural Science (3) Semester II 

312 Introductory Aviation (2) Semester I 

312a Introductory Aviation (3) Semester I 

392 Conservation of Natural Resources (2) not offered 1961-62 

392a Conservation of Natural Resources (3) not offered 1961-62 

400 Physical Science IV (3) not offered 1961-62 

401 Advanced Laboratory in Physical or Biological Science (2) 

Semester II 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Mr. Herbert Andrews, Dr. George Beishlag, Dr. Arnold Blum- 
berg, Dr. George Coleman, Mr. Norman Diffenderfer, Dr. Joseph 
Falco, Dr. David Firman, Dr. Harry Hutson, Mr. Edward Johns- 
ton, Miss Mary Catherine Kahl (Chairman), Mr. Curtis Martin, 
Dr. John Carter Matthews, Mr. Paul Mattingly, Dr. John McCleary, 
Dr. Charles Onion, Mrs. Betty Ryburn. 

Basic survey courses are available in geography, history, eco- 
nomics, political science and sociology. The department also offers 
advanced electives in each of the social science fields covering 
special regions and particular topical and systematic approaches. 

Courses in Geography 

103-104 Elements of Geography (6) two semesters 

309 Geography of Latin America (3) Semester I, 1962-63 

310 Geography of the United States (3) 

311 Geography of Europe (3) Semester II 
314 Geography of Asia (3) Semester I 
316 Economic Geography (3) Semester II 

318 Geography of Africa (3) Semester II 

319 Geogi-aphy of the USSR (3) Semester II, 1962-63 

320 History and Geography of Maryland (3) 

330 Geography Laboratory (2) Semester I 

331 Political Geography (3) Semester I 

413 Urban Geography (3) Semester I, 1962-63 

425 Map Reading and Interpretation (2) 

430 Proseminar: Problems in Geography (3) Semester II, 

1962-63 



39 



Courses in History 

121-122 History of Western Civilization (6) two semesters 

221-222 History of the United States (6) two semesters 

260 History of the Ancient World (3) Semester I 

303 Survey of English History to 1783 (3) Semester I 

304 British History Since 1783 (3) Semester II 
312 Europe Since 1914 (3) Semester I 

320 History and Geography of Maryland (3) 

321 Latin American History to 1820 (3) Semester I, 1962-63 

322 Latin American History Since 1820 (3) Semester II, 

1962-63 

333 Economic History of the United States (3) Semester I 

352 Diplomatic History of the United States (3) Semester I 

361 Medieval Civilization (3) Semester II 

362 Renaissance and Reformation (2) Semester II, 1962-63 
362a Renaissance and Reformation (3) Semester II, 1962-63 

363 Europe 1648-1815 (3) Semester I 

364 Europe 1815-1914 (3) Semester II, 1962-63 

365 History of Asia Since 1500 (3) Semester I, 1962-63 
370 Russia Since 1800 (3) Semester II 

405 Constitutional History of the United States (3) Semester I 

414 Intellectual History of the United States (3) Semester I, 

1962-63 

415 Social History of the United States (3) Semester II, 

1962-63 

416 Recent History of the United States (3) Semester II 

420 Proseminar in History (2) 
420a Proseminar in History (3) 

421 The Age of the American Revohition (3) Semester I, 

1962-63 
502 Seminar in the History of \Vestern Civilization (3) 

Courses in Economics 

202 Economic Principles and Problems (3) Semester I 

203 Economic Principles and Problems (3) Semester II 
312 Labor Economics and Labor Relations (3) Semester II 
325 Contemporary Economic Institutions (3) Semester II, 

1962-63 

Courses in Political Science 

206 Government of the United States (3) 

207 State and Local Government (3) Semester I 

307 International Relations (2) Semester II 

308 Comparative Government of Foreign Powers (3) 

Semester II 
351 Political Theory (3) Semester I, 1962-63 



40 



355 The Latin American Policy of the United States (2) 

Semester I, 1962-63 
355a The Latin American Policy of the United States (3) 

Semester I, 1962-63 
417 American Political Parties (2) Semester II 

Courses in Sociology 

201 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

205 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) Semester I 

310 Social Pathology (3) Semester II 

344 Marriage and the Family (2) 

THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Master of Education program is intended to help success- 
ful, certified, Maryland elementary school teachers improve their 
professional qualifications. Since the program is planned primarily 
for teachers in service, the courses are offered principally during 
the summer session and in the evening. Because study in the gradu- 
ate program is concentrated in the summer, a more detailed descrip- 
tion of it is included in the summer session bulletin. 

SUMMARY OF GRADUATES 

Junior College A A Certificates June 1960 18 

Teachers College BS Degrees J^ric 1960 290 

M Ed Degree 4 

Total number of Teachers College giaduates since 1866: 9,706 

ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 1959-60 

Men Women Total 

Junior College 36 48 84 

Teachers College 316 1059 1375 

Evening Classes 16 16 

Graduate Students 10 30 40 

Summer Session 158 649 807 

Grand Total 520 1802 2322 



41 




CATALOGUE 1962-1963 



CORRESPONDENCE 



The mailing address 



State Teachers College at Towson 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 

The telephone number 

823-7500 

Switchboard open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily 
except Saturday and Sunday 

Specific correspondence should be addressed as follows: 

ADMISSION MATTERS Director of Admissions 

BUSINESS MATTERS Business Manager 

GENERAL MATTERS President 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS Director of Residence 

SCHOLARSHIPS Dean of Students 

SUMMER SESSION Dean of Instruction 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORD Registrar 



BULLETIN OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT TOWSON 

is published four times a year by the State Teachers College at Towson, Balti- 
more 4, Maryland. Issued in February, March, May, October. Application to 
mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Baltimore, Maryland. New 
Series 1962. Vol. I, No. 1. 

MAY, 1962 



STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT TOWSON 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 




ALBERT S. COOK LIBRARY 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT TOWSON 

BALTIMORE 4, MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE 1962 - 1963 

Ninety-seventh Year Begins September, 1962 
1962, Number 1 



CONTENTS 

Calendar for 1962-63 5 

The College 7 

History 7 

Accreditation and State Support 7 

Objectives 8 

Campus and Building 9 

Facilities 11 

Future Development 12 

Admissions 13 

The Teacher Education Program 13 

The Arts and Sciences Program 16 

Summer Session, Special Students, and Graduate Program 17 

Expenses 18 

Student Life Program 22 

Health Service 22 

Residence Halls 23 

Financial Aid 24 

Veterans; Selective Service 29 

Student Organizations and Activities 29 

The College Curricula , 35 

Academic Regulations 52 

Courses of Instruction 57 

Graduate Program 132 

State Board of Education, 1960-61, 1961-62 139 

Administrative Officers, 1960-61, 1961-62 139 

Faculty and Staff, 1960-61, 1961-62 139 

Cooperating Teachers 1960-61, 1961-62 152 

Graduates, 1960, 1961 160 

Alumni Association, 1960-61, 1961-62 175 

Index 177 

Map of Campus Inside back cover 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT TOWSON, MARYLAND 

Calendar for 1962-63 



1962 

June 23, Saturday 



June 25, Monday 
July 4, Wednesday 
August 3, Friday 

1962 

September 10, Monday 

September 10, Monday 

September 11-14 
September 16, Sunday 

September 17, Monday 
September 24, Monday 

October 15, Monday 

November 13, Tuesday 
November 21, Wednesday 

November 25, Sunday 
November 26, Monday 
December 11, Tuesday 
December 21, Friday 

1963 

January 6, Sunday 
January 7, Monday 
January 21, Monday 
January 22, Tuesday 
January 29, Tuesday 



Summer Session 

Registration for classes, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 

Stephens Hall 
Registration for residence, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 

Newell Hall 

Classes begin 

No classes 

End of summer session 

Residence Halls close, 5 p.m. 

First Semester 

Registration for upperclassmen changing pre- 

registration 
Residence halls open for new students, 1 p.m. 

to 4 p.m. 
Orientation and registration for new students 
Residence halls open for returning students, 

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Last day for adding course or changing value 
of a course 

Last day for dropping course without receiv- 
ing grade of Pass or Fail 

Midsemester evaluation of students 

Thanksgiving holiday begins, 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close, 3 p.m. 

Residence halls open, 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Preregistration, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Christmas holiday begins, 2 p.m. 
Residence halls close, 3 p.m. 



Residence halls open, 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Reading day prior to final examinations 

First semester examinations begin 

First semester ends 



1963 

January 30, Wednesday 



February 4, Monday 

February 5, Tuesday 

February 6, Wednesday 
February 13, Wednesday 

March 6, Wednesday 

April 1, Monday 
April 11, Thursday 

April 21, Sunday 
April 22, Monday 
May 14, Tuesday 
May 28, Tuesday 
May 29, Wednesday 
June 5, Wednesday 
June 9, Sunday 



1963 

June 22, Saturday 
August 2, Friday 



Second Semester 

Residence halls open for new students, 9 a.m. 

to 11 a.m. 
New students report for orientation and pre- 

registration 
Residence halls open for returning students, 

1 p.m. 
Registration for returning students, 8:30 a.m. 

to 4:30 p.m. 
Classes begin 
Last day for adding course or changing value 

of a course 
Last day for dropping course without receiv- 
ing grade of Pass or Fail 
Midsemester evaluation of students 
Easter holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

Residence halls close, 3 p.m. 
Residence halls open, 3 p.m. 
Classes resume 

Preregistration, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Reading day prior to final examinations 
Second semester examinations begin 
Second semester ends 
Commencement 

Residence halls close, 6 p.m. 

Summer Session 

Registration for classes and residence 
End of summer session 



1962 



LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 



September 6, Thursday School opens 

November 21, Wednesday Thanksgiving holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

November 26, Monday Classes resume 

December 21, Friday Christmas holiday begins, 2 p.m. 



1963 

January 7, Monday 
April 11, Thursday 
April 22, Monday 
June 12, Wednesday 



Classes resume 

Easter holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

School closes 



THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY 

The State Teachers College at Towson, Maryland's oldest and 
largest teacher education institution, traces its history back to 1865, 
when the General Assembly of Maryland first established a State- 
wide public school system. A chapter of the law authorized the 
founding of the State's first Normal School which was formally 
opened in Baltimore on January 15, 1866. 

For many years it was the only institution devoted exclusively 
to the preparation of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 
Prior to 1900 the Head of the Normal School was, ex officio, the 
State Superintendent of Education, and the Normal School was the 
headquarters for the State Board of Education. 

The school had three locations in Baltimore City, the best re- 
membered being the Romanesque building on Lafayette Square 
which was erected for the School in 1876 and occupied for nearly 
forty years until the institution moved to its present suburban 
location in Towson. 

For the first sixty-five years of its history the school offered a 
two year course for the preparation of elementary school teachers 
for Maryland. In 1931 the course of study was extended to three 
years and in 1934 to four years. 

In 1935 the General Assembly authorized the institution to 
grant the Bachelor's degree and to change its name to the State 
Teachers College at Towson. For the past thirty-six years the col- 
lege has been offering a full four-year collegiate program. 

Until 1946 the college confined itself to the single purpose of 
educating teachers for the elementary schools. In that year a two- 
year junior college program in the arts and sciences was added. 

In 1947 the college enlarged its offerings to include the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the junior high school and in 1949 the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the kindergarten-primary grades. 

In 1958 a graduate program for elementary teachers leading 
to the degree Master of Education was inaugurated. 

In 1960 the college extended its offerings in teacher education 
to include the preparation of teachers for the senior high school. 
The former two-year junior college program was extended by action 
of the State Board of Education, to a four-year program in the arts 
and sciences leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bache- 
lor of Arts. 

ACCREDITATION AND STATE SUPPORT 

The College is accredited by the Maryland State Board of 
Education, the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 



Schools and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. It is a member of the American Council on Education 
and has been approved by the American Association of University 
Women. 

The College is an integral part of the system of public educa- 
tion in the State of Maryland. It is governed by the State Board of 
Education and is supported almost entirely by legislative appropria- 
tions. No tuition is charged Maryland residents for the teacher- 
education program. In lieu of tuition payments, students from 
Maryland pledge themselves to teach two years in the public schools 
of the State upon graduation. Students in the program of arts and 
sciences pay tuition. All students pay a curriculum fee. 

OBJECTIVES 

Objectives of the Teacher Education Program 

The central purpose of this program is to prepare the best 
possible teachers for the public schools of Maryland. To this end, 
the educational offerings comprise a careful blend of cultural and 
professional courses. The aim is to provide learning experiences 
through which students may acquire a broad cultural background, 
professional knowledge and skills, and a philosophy of education. 
In fulfillment of this purpose, the faculty aims to help each student 
demonstrate progress in ability to: 

1. Practice the values of democracy, accepting the responsibil- 
ities as well as the privileges involved. 

2. Live by ethical principles and respect spiritual values. 

3. Acquire facts, develop understandings, skills, and appro- 
priate attitudes in the various academic areas. 

4. Understand and use the general and special methods of 
inquiry of all the major disciplines. 

5. Learn and apply the contributions of the past, of all races, 
and other cultures. 

6. Gain increasing understanding of self and of human de- 
velopment. 

7. Know the materials for learning and the procedures for 
planning experiences to meet the needs of learners. 

8. Apply in teaching the principles that govern the learning 
process. 

9. Evaluate and record individual strengths and needs of 
learners. 

10. Organize time and daily living to foster physical and 
mental health. 

11. Go on learning continuously. 

Objectives of the Arts and Sciences Program 
The objectives of the teacher education program except for 
those which relate specifically to professional education, apply also 



to the program in arts and sciences. This program, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts, comprises a four 
year sequence of offerings for students who wish a general college 
education or who are preparing to enter one of the professions that 
require undergraduate education as a prerequisite. 

The program provides opportunities to major in Art, English, 
Speech and Dramatics, Mathematics, Physical Education, Biology, 
Geography, or History. Preprofessional programs are available for 
Engineering, Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Forestry, Nursing, 
and Medical Technology. 

CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS 

In 1915 the college moved to its present site in the southern 
part of Towson on York Road eight miles from the center of Balti- 
more City and a mile and a half beyond the city's northern bound- 
ary line. The campus of more than one hundred acres is one of the 
most beautiful in this part of the country. It offers opportunities 
for healthful outdoor recreation and for coordinating classroom 
instruction with field study. 

The college is near enough to Baltimore for students to share 
in the cultural advantages that the city offers. 

Within a five mile radius of the campus will be found Goucher 
College, John Hopkins University, Loyola College, Morgan State 
College, College of Notre Dame, Mt. St. Agnes College, and the 
Baltimore Museum of Art. The Walters Art Gallery, the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music and Library, and the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library in Baltimore are also accessible to students. The city affords 
many opportunities to attend opera, concerts, and the theatre. 

Although the institution can claim almost one hundred years 
of existence, it has occupied its present campus only slightly more 
than forty-five years. All buildings are thus of modern fire-resisting 
construction and have been erected in line with a definite plan of 
campus development. 

Stephens Hall (the administration building) is an impressive 
structure of Jacobean architecture which dominates the campus 
group and sets the pattern of architecture characteristic of all the 
buildings on the front campus. It is named for M. Bates Stephens, 
State Superintendent of Education from 1900 to 1920, and contains 
administrative offices, classrooms and laboratories, and the audito- 
rium. 

The Albert S. Cook Library, completed in 1957, is named for 
Albert S. Cook, State Superintendent of Schools from 1920 to 1941. 
This striking building of modern architecture and functional de- 
sign has a book capacity of 100,000 volumes and a seating capacity 
of 450. In addition to stack areas and general reading rooms, it 
contains a periodical room, a seminar room, a micro-film and micro- 



card room, a listening room for phonograph records, a lecture room, 
a teaching materials center, and several typing alcoves. The build- 
ing is completely air-conditioned. 

Van Bokkelen Hall was erected in 1931 and was used for a 
number of years as the campus elementary school. Completely re- 
modeled and renovated in 1961 it serves as a college classroom 
building for the departments of art, mathematics, speech and instru- 
mental music. Included in the building are recording and listening 
rooms for the speech department, piano practice rooms for the 
music department, and display areas for the art department. 

The building is named for Libertus Van Bokkelen who was 
Maryland's first Superintendent of Public Instruction, holding that 
post from 1865 to 1868. It was during this period that this school 
was founded. 

The Lida Lee Tall School is the campus laboratory school used 
for observation, demonstration, and the practice of teaching. It in- 
cludes a kindergarten and six grades of elementary school with two 
rooms for each grade. In addition to classrooms the building in- 
cludes offices, conference rooms, a health suite, a library, an art 
room, a music room, a science room with greenhouse, a cafeteria, 
an assembly room, and storage rooms. Erected in 1960, the building 
is of modern functional design and represents the best thinking in 
elementary school planning. 

Wiedefeld Gymnasium is named for M. Theresa Wiedefeld, 
president of the college from 1938 to 1947, during whose adminis- 
tration it was erected. The building includes a large playing floor, 
spectators' balcony, offices, special rooms for individual physical 
education work, and shower, locker and dressing room facilities. 

Newell Hall, named for McFadden Alexander Newell, the 
founder and first principal of the institution, is one of the three 
residence halls for women. In this hall are the offices of the resident 
director and the dietitian, a large foyer, a television room, a con- 
ference room, a guest room, service rooms for students, and study 
and committee rooms. Students' rooms on the first and second floors 
are arranged in suites of two rooms with bath. Each room accom- 
modates two or three students. The third floor has the usual ar- 
rangement of rooms and group baths. 

Richmond Hall, named for a former principal of the school, 
Sarah E. Richmond, adjoins Newell Hall. This building is occu- 
pied by freshmen women and some members of the Freshmen Ad- 
visory Council. Most of the rooms accommodate two students. 
There are a few single rooms and a sleeping porch with adjoining 
dressing and study rooms. On the first floor is a large attractive 
lounge which is used for formal social affairs. 

Prettvman Hall, named for E. Barrett Prettyman, principal of 
the school from 1890 to 1905, is the newest women's residence hall. 



10 



Most of its rooms accommodate two students, but there are a few 
single rooms and several larger rooms for three students. The build- 
ing contains a large lounge, several smaller lounges and study 
rooms, a recreation room, students' service rooms, and quarters for 
the resident director and resident supervisors. 

George W. Ward Hall and Henry S. West Hall are two iden- 
tical residence halls for men, named for former principals of the 
school. Each contains a lounge with connecting kitchen, recreation 
room, and office and apartment for the resident supervisor. Rooms 
for students are modern in design and equipped with built-in 
facilities. 

East Hall (a converted adjacent residence) is used to house 
visiting athletic teams. 

The Service Building includes the heating plant, engineers' 
offices, and the laundry. The top floor of this building is used as 
an auxiliary gymnasium. 

Glen Esk, the President's home, is located on the northern part 
of the campus. The large house is surrounded by some rare trees 
planted years before the college acquired the Towson site. 

Other buildings on the campus house the Health Center, and 
serve as homes for the chief engineer and the superintendent of 
grounds. 

FACILITIES 

The Library, now located in the modern Albert S. Cook Li- 
brary building, includes over 60,000 catalogued books in addition 
to a collection of 5,000 volumes in the library of the Lida Lee Tall 
School. The Cook library also houses periodicals, courses of study, 
text books, pictures, pamphlets, standardized tests, slides, film strips, 
maps, phonograph records and other audio-visual aids. A reserve 
book section is located near the main charging desk. 

The Dining Room in Newell Hall has a seating capacity of 500 
persons. It is open to day students and faculty at lunch time. 

The Auditorium located in a wing of Stephens Hall has a seat- 
ing capacity of one thousand in main floor and balcony. It is 
equipped with a Baldwin concert grand piano and a large Baldwin 
electronic organ. The stage has recently been supplied with a 
modern lighting system for the use of the dramatic groups. 

The Student Centre on the lower floor of the dining hall wing 
has a snack bar, bookshop, recreation room, lounge, a small dining 
room, offices for student organizations, a chapel, study rooms, and 
an outdoor patio. In the Lounge, the Art Department regularly 
sponsors a series of art exhibits which are open to the public. 

The Health Center in the Cottage west of the Library includes 
a physician's and nurses' offices, a diet kitchen, rooms for men and 



11 



women students, and living quarters for the nurse. A new Health 
Center is under construction. 

The Athletic Field in the north part of the campus is com- 
pletely tile-drained and surrounded by a quarter-mile cinder track. 
It is used for track, soccer, and baseball. Tennis courts, archery 
ranges and facilities for other outdoor activities are nearby. 

The Post Office located on the ground floor of Stephens Hall is 
a regular branch of the Baltimore Post Office. It is open daily from 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday for the 
sale of stamps and money orders and for mailing letters and pack- 
ages. 

The Glen containing ten acres of land is developed as a con- 
servation and recreation area. It is registered as a bird sanctuary 
and is a United States bird banding station. Science classes use the 
Glen as a laboratory. Several outdoors fireplaces and a large shelter 
with fireplace provide opportunity for many outdoor social activ- 
ities. 

An Aviation Center is a feature of the science department. It 
is equipped with a Link Trainer and is used by college students, 
pupils from the Lida Lee Tall School and from neighboring public 
schools. 

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT 

The sharp increase in enrollment in public elementary and 
secondary schools is certain to lead to an increased enrollment in 
the colleges within the next few years. The State Department of 
Education has estimated that this college should look forward to 
an enrollment of 3,000 or more students in order to more nearly 
meet the need for teachers in the public schools of the State. 

The college has been fortunate in securing the services of a 
nationally recognized firm of landscape and campus architects. 
They are advising the college regarding the placement of future 
buildings that are likely to be needed. 

Requests presented to the State Planning Commission for fu- 
ture development include additional men's and women's residence 
halls, a new physical education building, a fine and dramatic arts 
building, a science building, a service building, additional class- 
rooms, a student union, and an addition to the library. 



12 



ADMISSIONS 

ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program is granted to ail 
applicants whose academic and personal qualifications and interest 
in the teaching profession give promise of success in the College. 
Because of limited facilities, the College reserves the right to close 
admissions when no further space remains. It is therefore advisable 
for high school students to make their college choice at the close of 
the junior year or early in the senior year. 

Students seeking admission should file applications by Decem- 
ber of the senior year. Part I is submitted to the College Admis- 
sions Office and Part II is filed with the high school counselor with 
the request that it be forwarded to the College immediately upon 
the close of the first semester. It is requested that all admission 
material reach the College not later than April 1, prior to the Sep- 
tember when admission is desired. Admission for February is 
limited to students with advanced standing or students who have 
been out of high school at least two years. 

Applicants with excellent records are granted admission on the 
basis of seven semesters of high school work, with the understanding 
that the remaining high school work will be satisfactory. Other 
applicants are granted tentative admission or notified that the de- 
cision concerning admission will be postponed until June. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Graduation from approved high school.* 

An approved high school is a standard public high school 
or an accredited non-public secondary school. 

2. Recommendation from local school officials. 

Each candidate for admission from a Maryland public high 
school must be recommended by both the high school principal and 
the superintendent of schools in whose area the high school is lo- 
cated. A graduate of a non-public Maryland school or an out-of- 
state school must have the recommendation of the high school 
principal. 

3. Specific subject matter units. 

All applicants must have completed a well-organized cur- 



Applicants over 19 years of age who are not graduates of ap- 
proved high schools may qualify for admission by making satis- 
factory grades in the Equivalence Examinations. The State De- 
partment of Education will issue equivalence diplomas based 
upon tests given by the Department or will accept the records 
from USAFI for veterans. 



13 



riculum totaling 16 units, including the following subjects required 
for graduation from any Maryland public high school: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 1 unit 

Social Sciences, of which 1 unit must 

be United States History 3 units 

Science 2 units 

Electives 6 units 

Total 16 units 

4. Achievement in scholarship. 

a. The scholarship standards for students entering from Balti- 
more City and from the counties, though based on different mark- 
ing systems, are approximately the same. They are as follows: 
County Students. The scholarship standard set by the State Board 
of Education as the basis for certification by the high school prin- 
cipal for college entrance requires that the applicant shall have 
made a grade of A or B in at least 60 percent of the college entrance 
courses and a grade of C or higher in all other college entrance 
courses taken during the last two years of high school. Students not 
meeting this average may be considered for admission on the 
recommendation of the high school principal and the approval of 
the superintendent of schools. 

Baltimore City Students. The agreement with the State Depart- 
ment of Education on the scholarship standards recommended by 
the Board of School Commissioners of Baltimore City as the basis 
of certification for admission to the teachers colleges is that the stu- 
dent must have made an average of 80 per cent in the last two years 
of high school work. Students with averages between 75 and 80 may 
be considered for admission on the recommendation of the high 
school principal and the approval of the superintendent of schools. 

b. The testing programs now operating in the high schools 
and the freshman testing program of the college are regarded as 
sources of important supplementary data. Results of these tests are 
used in analyzing a student's potentialities and may serve as addi- 
tional bases for determining a student's readiness for college. 

c. Students entering from private schools are considered under 
the same scholarship standards as those coming from public high 
schools. Some of the private schools use letter grades, while others 
follow a numerical grading system. 

5. Certification by the College Physician. 

Applicants must meet acceptable standards of health and 
physical fitness; therefore a thorough physical examination by the 
College Physician is required of all students. Complete speech and 
hearing tests are required of those referred to the speech clinic by 
the College Physician or the Admissions Office. 



14 



6. Citizenship in the United States. 

According to a bylaw passed by the State Board of Education, 
only citizens of the United States shall be employed in the State 
public school system or admitted to the state teachers colleges. The 
Board may make exceptions in special cases upon the recommenda- 
tion of the College and the State Superintendent of Schools. 

The Pledge to Teach in the State of Maryland 

Every Maryland student applying for admission to the Teacher 
Education program is required to sign the pledge to teach two years 
in Maryland immediately following graduation unless temporarily 
released by the State Board of Education. 

A student who for any reason cannot teach immediately upon 
graduation is expected to secure from the President of the College 
a deferment or a release. 

Deferments may be granted for periods of one or two years 
for reasons deemed valid by the president. A release from the 
pledge to teach is granted only in rare circumstances when it is 
obvious that fulfilling the pledge would be a virtual impossibility. 

A student who, upon graduation, does not teach and does not 
obtain a release or deferment shall have entered on his permanent 
record a statement that he is not entitled to honorable dismissal 
because of his failure to fulfill his obligation to the State. 

Admission Procedures 

1. Secure an application blank from the guidance department 
of the high school or from the Admissions Office of the 
College. 

2. Complete Part I of the application and forward to the Ad- 
missions Office with the application fee of ten dollars. Give 
Part II of application to the high school counselor at the 
time of submitting Part I to the College. 

3. Entrance tests (American College Test) are given at a 
designated testing center. Students who have submitted 
applications are notified of the date and place to report for 
entrance examinations. 

4. The high school counselor will send Part II of application 
to the College Admissions Office as soon as the grades for 
the first semester of the senior year are available. 

5. As soon as all admission material is on file, the student is 
sent official information concerning eligibility. After official 
notification of eligibility, the student is asked to send an 
advance payment of fifteen dollars to the College as well as 
a ten-dollar room reservation fee if eligible for residence on 
the campus. 



15 



ADMISSION TO THE ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAM 

The requirements for admission to the Arts and Sciences pro- 
gram are the same as those to the Teacher Education program, ex- 
cept for the following: (1) the application does not have to be 
approved by the School Superintendent; (2) the applicant to the 
program in Arts and Sciences does not have to meet as rigid physical 
standards as the Teacher Education student. 

Advanced Placement and Advanced Credit for Entering 

Freshmen 

The College does not wish students to repeat work already 
taken. Entering freshmen who have had the opportunity for ad- 
vanced work may receive advanced placement (and in some cases 
advanced credit) for this work. 

During the spring prior to admission or during the opening 
week, freshmen take placement tests in various fields, and registra- 
tion is based on the results of these tests. 

Students who would like advanced credit as well as advanced 
placement are required to take the Advanced Placement Tests of 
the College Entrance Examination Board in May of the senior year 
of secondary school. These tests are scored and sent to the College 
about September 1; they are then considered along with grades in 
these subjects and the recommendations by departments concerned. 
At the time of registration students are notified about advanced 
placement and credit. 

A bulletin of information about the Advanced Placement Tests 
may be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, 
P.O. Box 592, Princeton, N. J. 

Transfer Between Arts and Sciences 
AND Teacher Education Programs 

Students in either Teacher Education or Arts and Sciences 
desiring to transfer to the other program in the College may secure 
the necessary request forms in the Registrar's Office. 

Those seeking transfer to Teacher Education from Arts and 
Sciences must meet the health, speech, and academic standards and 
must sign the Pledge to Teach. Usually, transfer will be considered 
only for the September semester and only for students who have 
enrolled for two semesters. 

All applicants for transfer within the College must have the 
approval of the Committee on Admissions and Standards. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

In addition to meeting the regulations under Admission Re- 
quirements, an applicant for advanced standing must present com- 



16 



plete records from each college attended and an acceptable aca- 
demic record from the college that he last attended. Personal recom- 
mendations from colleges previously attended are also required. 

Courses offered for transfer credit must be of C grade quality 
or better. 

A satisfactory record in this college is necessary to establish 
advanced standing. Advanced standing is provisional until the stu- 
dent shows ability to maintain a satisfactory record in this college. 

Transfer Between Maryland Teachers Colleges 

A student may not transfer from one Maryland state teachers 
college to another except by written permission from the State 
Board of Education. A student with failures in his courses will not 
be considered for transfer. 

SUMMER SESSION AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Because of the urgent need for elementary school teachers in 
Maryland, the College provides for part-time and summer study as 
follows: (1) a program for graduates of liberal arts colleges, to be 
taken during three six-week summer terms or in two semesters on 
the campus, (2) part-time study, including late afternoon or eve- 
ning classes for public school teachers on emergency certificates who 
wish to work toward their degrees, (3) a six-week summer session 
for (a) undergraduates who are former students of the College and 
hold teaching contracts or former students of other colleges with 
teaching positions who wish to work toward a degree, (b) present 
students of the College who have their advisers' approval, (c) stu- 
dents currently enrolled in other colleges who have the permission 
of the institution where matriculated to attend the Towson sum- 
mer session, and (d) public elementary school teachers who qualify 
for admission to the Graduate Program (see page 132). Further 
information regarding the summer session should be requested from 
the Dean of Instruction at least one month prior to the date for 
registration. A bulletin is published early in each calendar year. 



17 



EXPENSES 

TUITION 

For Maryland residents who register for the Teacher Education 
program no tuition is charged. In lieu of paying tuition they pledge 
at least two years of teaching service in the public schools of the 
State upon graduation. 

Those who enroll in the Arts and Sciences program pay $200 
per year tuition. 

For out-of-state students the tuition is |450 per year for enroll- 
ment in either the Teacher Education or the Arts and Sciences 
program. 

Part-time students (normally those who register for less than 
12 semester hours) in the regular session, and all summer students, 
pay fifteen dollars per credit hour each term. Out-of-state summer 
students pay an additional fifteen dollars. Graduate student ex- 
penses are outlined on page 133. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING COSTS 

Students who live on the campus pay $312 for room and board 
for the academic year. Students approved as boarding students for 
whom residence facilities are not available pay $225 a year for meals 
only. As residence space becomes available these students who are 
eligible to reside in the dormitories will be required to room in one 
of the halls, at which time an adjustment will be made in the rate 
charged for board and room. 

For all students who live off campus and take their meals in 
the college dining room, the cost for meals is $225 per year— $112.50 
per semester. 

Rates for living expenses are subject to change by the State 
Board of Education. 

OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

An activities fee of twenty-five dollars a year is assigned to the 
Student Government Association fund for class dues, student pub- 
lication, dramatics, assembly programs and other authorized proj- 
ects. 

An athletic fee of fifteen dollars a year is assigned to the ath- 
letic associations and used for the athletic and physical education 
program. 

A limited number of lockers are available for student use. The 
college assumes no responsibility for personal property placed in 
the lockers. There is a fifty-cent locker fee and a fifty-cent gymnas- 
ium locker fee. 



18 



A curriculum fee of $10.00 each semester ($20.00 per year) is 
used for supplies and materials for classroom instruction. 

Each student shares a mailbox with another student. There is 
an annual fee of fifty cents for the mail box. 

A student is expected to buy the textbooks for his courses. 
These may be purchased in the College Bookshop. Students are 
required to buy gymnasium suits for the courses in physical educa- 
tion. 

A late-registration fee of five dollars is charged to any student 
who registers after the date of registration named in the Catalogue 
calendar. This fee also applies if a student does not pre-register as 
prescribed. 

There is a ten-dollar graduation fee for those receiving the 
Master's degree. 

Part-time and summer students are charged fifteen dollars per 
credit hour for courses audited. 

STUDENT TEACHER TRANSPORTATION FEE 

Beginning with the Fall Term 1962, each student is respon- 
sible for his own transportation to and from his student teaching 
center. 

Students unable to make other arrangements for transportation 
to centers not accessible by public transportation or by other means 
may apply for transportation at the college Business Office. When- 
ever possible, college vehicles will be made available to groups of 
students at rates specified below. Such transportation cannot be 
guaranteed^ however. 

Transportation to student teaching centers when provided by 
the college will be charged at the rate of sixty cents per day, payable 
in advance for each student teaching experience. This will mean 
the following approximate amounts: 

Students in the Kindergarten-Primary division— $19 per ex- 
perience ($38 for both terms); 

Students in the Elementary division— $36 per experience; 
Students in the Secondary division— $30 per experience. 

No refunds will be made after the second week of full-time 
teaching. 

No college vehicle will be sent to: centers within walking dis- 
tance (two miles); centers available by public transportation; cen- 
ters which may be reached through other arrangements which may 
be made with (1) students driving their own cars, (2) rides provided 
by teachers in the school, (3) other possible transportation facil- 
ities. 



19 



Vehicles will be made available only if at least five students are 
involved. The driver will be allowed to ride without payment of 
the fee. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES: MARYLAND RESIDENTS 

Teacher Education Students 

Semester Semester Total for 
I II Year 

Activities Fee I 25.00 $ 25.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 15.00 

Mail Box and Locker Fee 1.00 1.00 

Curriculum Fee 10.00 $ 10.00 20.00 

Total Day Students $ 51.00 $ 10.00 $ 61.00 

Arts and Sciences Students 

Fees as above I 51.00 $ 10.00 | 61.00 

tuition 100.00 100.00 200.00 

Total-Day Students $151.00 |110.00 |261.00 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the 
State Teachers College at Towson for the exact amount of the 
charges. All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
No student will be admitted to classes until such payment has been 
made. A late fee of $5.00 is charged for failure to pay before or on 
the day of registration. 

ADVANCE PAYMENTS 

Each applicant must pay an application fee of $10.00 and no 
application will be processed without this fee. When accepted, each 
applicant must make an advance payment of $15.00 in order to 
reserve a place in the college. Both the application and advance 
payment fees are applied to the total student fees due at the time 
of registration. The application fee is not refundable. The advance 
payment fee is refundable only when the applicant is not eligible 
and admission is denied. 

A deposit of $10.00 for room reservation is required of all ap- 
plicants who are eligible to live on the campus because of living 
outside the commuting boundaries. This fee is applied to the final 
amount of room and board due at the time of registration. 

The above room deposit is refundable if the student cancels 
his application and notifies the Admissions Office, in writing, prior 
to June 30 for those entering in September and prior to December 
15 for those entering in February, or if the College denies admis- 
sion to the applicant. 

All advance payments are sent to the Admissions Office. 



20 



LIABILITY FOR UNPAID TUITION 

A Maryland student enrolled in the Teacher Education pro- 
gram pays no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the 
State. 

If he leaves before graduation and requests a transcript for the 
purpose of continuing his education in a college program which 
does not lead to teacher certification, he will be billed at the Arts 
and Sciences tuition rate for the education he obtained at the 
College. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he 
transfers to a Maryland institution which has a teacher education 
program approved by the State Department of Education and if he 
reaffirms his pledge to teach for two years in the Maryland public 
schools upon graduation. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

A student withdrawing from the College must complete an 
official withdrawal card and file it in the Registrar's Office before 
he is entitled to any refund. Refunds are made on the following 
bases: 

Day Students 

A day student who withdraws within two weeks after his 
initial registration is entitled to a refund of fees paid and to a 
refund of tuition for the semester minus ten dollars. After the 
two-week period no fees or tuition are refunded. 

Boarding Students 

A boarding student who withdraws from the college receives 
refunds for fees and tuition in accordance with the regulation for 
day students. The refund of payment for room and meals is sub- 
ject to the following regulations: 

1. A student who withdraws from the dormitory within two 
weeks after the initial registration will be charged for one 
week in excess of his residence in the College. 

2. A student who withdraws from the dormitory at the re- 
quest of the College after the first two weeks of any semester 
will be charged for one week in excess of his residence in 
the College. 

3. A student who withdraws from the dormitory on his own 
or his guardian's initiative after the two weeks following 
registration and before mid-semester will receive no refund 
of room and board for the first half of the semester. If the 
withdrawal occurs after the mid-semester, there will be no 
refund of room and board paid for the entire semester. 



21 



STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 

A Student Life Council, consisting o£ faculty members and stu- 
dents, coordinates the program, establishes policy, and handles 
cases referred to it. The Council is responsible to the President of 
the College. College housing and boarding, the health program, 
financial aid, part-time employment, the advisory system, orienta- 
tion of new students, student publications, clubs and religious 
groups, career guidance, campus traffic involving students, and the 
Student Centre are all part of the student life program. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Medical advice and emergency office treatment are available 
and free to all students. In cases of contagious disease or acute ill- 
ness parents are notified and are required to remove the student 
from the campus for the duration of the condition. The profes- 
sional staff consists of the college physician, two full-time graduate 
nurses and a licensed, full-time practical nurse. The physician 
maintains office hours at the College and is on call at all times. 

A physical examination by the college physician is required 
of all students prior to the time of admission. Additional examina- 
tions are given when conditions warrant. A student is expected to 
correct remedial defects immediately. Failure to follow the physi- 
cian's instructions will jeopardize a student's status in the college. 
Annual chest X-rays are compulsory for all students. Health educa- 
tion and prevention of disease are essential parts of the college 
health program. 

The college assumes no financial responsibility for illness of 
sufficient seriousness to require hospitalization. X-rays, or special 
treatment. The college does not assume financial responsibility for 
any injury incurred upon the athletic field or in any physical edu- 
cation class. 

A student who has a physical condition which prevents com- 
plete participation in the regular physical education program may 
be permitted upon authorization of the college physician and the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards to take a modified pro- 
gram or be exempt from physical education requirements. 

AccmENT Insurance 

For the benefit of those students who wish to participate, the 
college enters into an agreement with an approved insurance com- 
pany to cover the students against any accidental injury either at 
college or at home during the college year. Participation in the 
plan is voluntary and costs approximately .S4.50 for women and 
S7.30 for men. Students desiring this coverage should make appli- 
cation at the Business Office. 



22 



LiDA Lee Tall Health Services 

The children attending the Lida Lee Tall School have the 
advantage of services rendered in the health suite of their school. 
A nurse is on duty two hours a day, and the college physician con- 
ducts physical examinations there. Additional services are available 
to the children in the college Health Center. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Policies 

Due to increasing enrollment and limited facilities for campus 
living, applications for residence hall space can be accepted only 
from students enrolled in the Teacher Education Program. Arts 
and Sciences students who are not able to commute will be given 
assistance in securing rooms in college-approved homes off campus 
and the privilege of taking their meals in the College dining hall. 

To qualify for living on the campus, a student inust be single, 
enrolled in the Teachers College, and carrying a minimum of 
twelve semester hours of credit. 

A married student whose husband or wife lives at a distance 
greater than 50 miles from the College may also be eligible for 
residence living. A Housing Committee handles all exceptions on 
an individual basis. 

Single students under twenty-one years of age who live in off- 
campus housing other than their legal residence must live in col- 
lege-approved homes. These students are responsible to the Direc- 
tor of Residence Halls and are expected to adhere to the rules and 
regulations of the residence councils. 

Priority for residence is given to the Teacher Education stu- 
dent who resides beyond a twenty-mile radius of State Teachers 
College at Towson. A student who resides beyond a twelve-mile 
radius but within a twenty-mile radius of the college may live in 
residence only if he lives beyond public transportation by one mile, 
or lives more than two hours away by existing public transporta- 
tion. A student who resides within a twelve-mile radius of the State 
Teachers College at Towson is ineligible for residence. 

Students who have reserved a room and entered a residence 
hall may withdraw to become day students only in case of change 
of residence or student teaching in their home areas. An adjust- 
ment of fees is made in the Business Office for special cases. If 
vacancies occur in the halls during the year, students on the wait- 
ing list may be admitted according to their dates of application, 
commuting problems or other special circumstances. 

A student living in residence who withdraws from the student 
teaching block at the end of the preliminary courses and before 
going out to student teach will be required to leave college resi- 
dence. 

23 



All residence hall students are expected to leave the halls no 
later than twenty-four hours following their last examination at 
the end of each semester. (See the college calendar for times of 
opening of residence halls.) 

Room Furnishing for Residence Students 

Each student will need at least four single sheets, one pair of 
blankets and pillow cases, spread, quilted pad for bed 72 x 30 
inches, towels, and two laundry bags. Bed linen and towels must 
have woven tags attached giving the student's full name. 

Activities 

Men and women students in the residence halls elect as their 
governing bodies a Women's Residence Council and a Men's Resi- 
dence Council. There are also three subordinate bodies of the 
Women's Residence Council, known as Prettyman Hall House 
Council, Newell-Richmond Hall House Council and the Judicial 
Board. These groups in cooperation with the residence personnel 
formulate policies pertaining to group living and arrange a pro- 
gram of activities for the resident students. The Judicial Board 
handles cases of infractions by women in residence. Any student 
may be required to leave residence on the recommendation of the 
Judicial Board and its acceptance by College authorities. 

The College encourages students to attend services in the 
churches of their choice and makes it possible for them to meet 
the local clergymen. 

Students who are absent frequently over week-ends miss much 
of the education that living at college affords. Students are there- 
fore encouraged to remain on the campus for as many weekends as 
possible. 

FINANCIAL AID 

All students attending the College receive subsidy from the 
State, and residents of the State of Maryland enrolled in the Teach- 
ers College pay no tuition. Still, there are the costs of residence 
living, transportation, books and other incidental matters which 
some students are unable to meet. Limited assistance is available 
through the scholarship fund or one of the loan funds. 

The establishment of policy concerning scholarships and loans 
and the administration of funds is under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Financial Aid, subject to the approval of the Student Life 
Council and the President of the College. 

Scholarships 

The Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships were established by 
the will of Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of J. Charles Linthicum, 



24 



who was a member o£ the class of 1886. The fund is administered 
by the trustees of the estate and the College committee. Both fresh- 
men and upperclassmen are eligible for these one hundred dollar 
awards. Fifteen of the scholarships have been set aside for entering 
freshmen. High school seniors who are contemplating entering the 
college and who need some assistance in meeting college expenses 
for tlie first year should write to the Director of Admissions for 
scholarship application blanks. These applications must be filed 
no later than April 15. 

Income from the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund is allocated 
in fifty-dollar amounts to students in the Teachers College. This 
fund was begun by Miss Richmond, a former principal of the 
normal school, and augmented by her friends. Five scholarships 
are usually awarded. 

One upper-class student may receive the Minnie V. Medwedeff 
Endowment Scholarship. This award is made annually to an out- 
standing student selected by the trustees of the fund. The scholar- 
ship was established in memory of Minnie V. Medwedeff by her 
father. Miss MedwedeflE was an instructor in the college from 1924 
until her death in 1935. 

Other scholarships, usually $100, are donated by various com- 
munity groups. Service clubs, parent-teacher associations, women's 
clubs and businesses are among the groups which furnish scholar- 
ships. Some of the organizations ask the College to select the award 
winners and some select their own recipients. 

Upper-class students may secure application blanks for all col- 
lege allocated scholarships from the Business Office and file them 
with the chairman of the Committee on Financial Aid. For con- 
sideration for the academic year, applications must be filed by 
April 1, prior to the September term. 

Loans 

Students in need of funds to meet college expenses may submit 
an application to the chairman of the Committee on Financial Aid 
at any time the need becomes evident. College loans are made at a 
low rate of interest and can be renewed until after the student has 
received a position. 

Four loan funds have been established for college students. 
They are the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund, the College Loan 
Fund, the Edward Moulton Fund and the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program. 

The Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund was established by Sarah 
E. Richmond, who was connected with the college for fifty-five 
years, as student, teacher, principal and dean of women. This fund 
has been increased by gifts from the alumni association. The Sarah 
E. Richmond Fund is administered by a special alumni committee 



25 



consisting of Mr. George Schluderberg, Mrs. Grace Carroll, and 
Mrs. Mary N. Lynch. Requests for loans from this fund may be 
made to Mr. Schluderberg, 3613 Lochearn Drive, Baltimore 7, 
Maryland. 

The College Loan Fund has a value of $8,000 and was made 
by contributions from the following: the Class of 1900 Memorial to 
Katherine Muhlback, the Class of 1925, the Normal Literary So- 
ciety, the Pestalozzi Society, the Reese Arnold Memorial, the Lillian 
Jackson Memorial, the Esther Sheel Memorial (Class of 1927), the 
Carpenter Memorial, the Eunice K. Crabtree Fund (gift of the Class 
of 1931), the Pauline Rutledge Fund (gift of the Class of 1934), the 
Pearle Blood Fund (gift of the Class of 1940), the 1933 Gift Loan 
Fund of Faculty and Students, the Gertrude Carley Memorial, 
Washington County Alumni, the Grace Boryer Downin Fund, the 
Class of 1941 Fund, the Martha Richmond Fund, the Tower Light 
Fund, the M. Clarice Bersch Fund (gift of the Class of 1951), the 
Bettie Sipple Fund sponsored by the Maryland Federation of 
Women's Clubs, the Lucy Scott Memorial Fund, the James B. 
O'Toole, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund, the Ellen Pratt Hamilton 
Memorial Loan Fund, and the Rodgers Forge PTA Loan Fund in 
Memory of Ellen Pratt Hamilton. 

The Edward Moulton Fund, with assets of $2500, established 
in memory of a student of the Class of 1957, is a short-term loan 
fund limited to $75 and open to all students, interest free. Applica- 
tions for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of Stu- 
dents. 

The National Defense Student Loan Program was established 
by the National Defense Education Act of 1958. The Act provides 
that the repayment of the principal of the loan, together with 
accrued interest thereon, shall be made to the college over a ten 
year period beginning one year after the date when the borrower 
ceases to be a full-time student and ending eleven years after such 
date. The loan bears simple interest upon the unpaid balance at 
the rate of 3 per cent per year. Interest does not begin to accrue 
until one year from the date the borrower ceases to be a full-time 
student. The loan, and interest thereon, of any borrower who serves 
as a full-time teacher in a public elementary or secondary school 
within a state shall be cancelled up to a maximum of 50 per cent 
at the rate of 10 per cent of the amount of the loan plus interest 
thereon for each academic year of service. 

Under provisions of the Act, students must meet four qualifica- 
tions to be eligible for assistance: they must be citizens or perman- 
ent residents of the United States; they must be in good academic 
standing and, in the opinion of the college, capable of maintaining 
a strong academic record; they must be full-time undergraduate 
students; they must show financial need. Students attending the 
college may obtain application forms from the Business Office. High 



26 



school seniors should write to the Chairman of the Committee on 
Financial Aid at the college. 

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

Students who operate vehicles in the Towson area must register 
these vehicles with the Business Office at the time of course regis- 
tration. The operation of vehicles on the Towson campus and the 
use of campus parking facilities are privileges extended to eligible 
student personnel. Parking space limitations require the issuing of 
parking permits on the basis of student need. Detailed traffic and 
parking regulations are issued and must be adhered to in order to 
avoid fines and other disciplinary action. A student-faculty commit- 
tee establishes and carries out policy under the asupices of the Stu- 
dent Life Council. 

ADVISEMENT 

Pre-admission 

A close relationship exists between the guidance departments 
of the high schools and the admissions office of the College. This 
relationship enables students to become acquainted with the Col- 
lege offerings early in their high school course and to work toward 
meeting the admission requirements. Representatives of the Col- 
lege participate in college nights and career days sponsored by 
school systems throughout the state. Visiting days for high school 
seniors are held on the campus each fall, followed by an open house 
for parents of high school juniors and seniors. All of these direct 
contacts with the college assist juniors and seniors in determining 
their college choices. 

After an application is filed, each student is asked to report to 
the College for a physical examination and an interview with a 
member of the admissions staff. The high school record and results 
of the entrance test aid the interviewer in counseling the student. 
If there is doubt concerning the eligibility of an applicant, he is 
assisted in making other plans and contacts. If the applicant is 
planning residence housing, the admissions interview is followed by 
an interview with a member of the residence staff. 

Freshmen 

Selected faculty members serve as personal and professional 
counselors to freshmen. Personal interviews, group meetings, and 
laboratory experiences are provided to promote self-orientation and 
to help freshmen explore interests and abilities of professional 
significance. This program of personal and professional orientation 
is organized and administered as a regular part of the college cur- 
riculum. During the first semester Teacher Education students par- 
ticipate for three days in the public schools of the state as partial 
preparation for the selection of a suitable teaching area. Arts and 



27 



Sciences students spend this time in career study under the super- 
vision of an adviser. Preparation of the career report may include 
a self-analysis, job analysis, community contacts, the taking of spe- 
cial tests and a study of professional literature. (See Orientation 
0.090 and 0.095, page (58), and Freshman Advisory Council, page 
(30), for further details.) 

On the first Sunday of the fall semester, parents of all freshmen 
students are invited to spend an afternoon at the college. This oc- 
casion provides an opportunity for parents to tour the campus and 
to meet other parents, students and some faculty members. 

Upperclassmen 

At the end of the freshman year, each student selects a faculty 
member who will serve as his adviser for the remaining years the 
student is in college. Students should consider requesting an adviser 
in the area of their primary academic interest, particularly if they 
wish to qualify for a major in that department. The relationship 
between student and adviser provides the student with an under- 
standing adult with whom he may discuss his personal, professional 
and educational problems, and consider his special needs. When 
such assistance seems desirable, students are encouraged to consult 
instructors, the deans, and other college officials. 

PLACEMENT 

Teacher Education Students 

The supervisors of student teaching furnish the seniors with 
whom they work information concerning placement in city or 
county schools. The Dean of Instruction helps to coordinate the 
requests from superintendents of schools for candidates at the vari- 
ous teaching levels. From the Registrar's Office are sent out com- 
plete records of each graduate, including a summary of his progress 
in the college and a full report of his student teaching. Each fall 
the College sponsors a Superintendents' Day. Teacher Education 
students are given an opportunity to confer with representatives of 
the various Maryland school systems. 

Arts and Sciences Students 

Plans are being made to provide a transfer and placement serv- 
ive for students in the program of Arts and Sciences. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

On Campus 

Opportunity for student employment on campus is limited. 
New students are not eligible until their second semester in attend- 
ance. All students on the college payroll must be in good standing. 



Normally, no student works beyond twelve hours weekly. The col- 
lege library, cafeteria, various offices and departments employ stu- 
dents. All requests for employment are filed in the Office of the 
Dean of Students. 

Off Campus 

The Dean of Students posts notices from outsiders requesting 
students for employment during the academic year and during the 
summer. The college can assume no responsibility for working con- 
ditions or remuneration. 

VETERAN STUDENTS 

Students entitled to the vocational rehabilitation and educa- 
tional assistance offered through the Veterans Administration, 
namely, Disabled Veterans, Korean War Veterans and War Or- 
phans, should consult the nearest office of the Veterans Adminis- 
tration at least 60 days prior to college entrance and should present 
their VA Certificates for Education and Training at the Registrar's 
Office during the college registration period in September or 
February. The college appoints a member of the faculty to serve 
as adviser to students receiving educational benefits through the 
Veterans Administration. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

High school senior men should consult their counselor for in- 
formation on the Qualification Test administered by the Selective 
Service to determine men eligible for Class II-S student deferments. 
Students admitted to college may request the Registrar's Office, im- 
mediately after registration, to make a report on their academic 
progress at the end of each academic year (two semesters) to their 
local Selective Service Board. For this purpose each student must 
present his Classification Card at the Registrar's Office. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Extracurricular activities are provided for the many and varied 
interests of Towson students. Out-of-class activities are recognized 
as worthwhile complements and supplements to a college education, 
and students are encouraged to participate. 

STUDENT GOVERNING ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association is the student govern- 
mental body authorized by the administration of the college. Upon 
enrollment at Towson each student automatically becomes a mem- 
ber of the SGA. The organization is composed of an Executive 
Committee and a Student Senate comprised of elected representa- 
tives of each campus extracurricular organization. 



29 



The SGA operates on a budget derived from the required stu- 
dent activity fee and has fiscal autonomy. To promote the 
objectives outlined in its constitution, the SGA maintains sub- 
committees ranging in scope from national and international afiEairs 
to local social events. Committee membership is open to all inter- 
ested students. 

Each College organization must secure the approval of the Stu- 
dent Government Association before it may function on the cam- 
pus. Once an organization's constitution is approved, that club is 
eligible for financial subsidy from the SGA. 

Student REsmENCE Councils 

The Men's and Women's Residence Councils, with the coopera- 
tion of all residence students, are responsible for establishing and 
maintaining standards of group living and for promoting the social 
program of the residence halls. The Resident Director and her as- 
sistants cooperate with these groups. 

Student Centre Board 

The main objective of the Student Centre Board is to set the 
policies governing the Student Centre, promote student friendliness, 
social life, and general college spirit, and to add to the educational 
and cultural atmosphere of the College through the use of facilities 
provided, whenever such use may contribute to the convenience of 
students, faculty and their friends. The Student Centre Board is 
responsible to the President of the College. 

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 

Freshman Advisory Council 

The Freshman Advisory Council is an organization whose pur- 
pose is to aid new students in becoming acquainted with college 
life. The Orientation Program during the first week at college is 
especially designed by the FAC and the faculty to answer all ques- 
tions that arise from students concerning clubs and organizations, 
social functions, or academic matters, and to present a comprehen- 
sive view of life at Towson. 

Alpha Phi Omega 

Alpha Phi Omega, a national service fraternity, is composed of 
men who are or have been Boy Scouts and who have a desire to 
serve others. There are many opportunities for service and social 
interchange on campus and regional levels. 

Circle K Club 

The Circle K Club is sponsored jointly by the Towson Kiwanis 
Club and the College. It is a men's organization founded on the 



30 



principles of Kiwanis International and dedicated to service to the 
College and its community. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Inter-Faith Council 

The Inter-Faith Council is composed of the president and a 
representative from each religious organization on campus. This 
group is responsible for the coordination of religious activities at 
Towson. 

Inter-Denominational Clubs 

YM - YWCA 

The YM-YWCA (formerly the Student Christian Association), 
the oldest religious organization on campus, ofEers an opportunity 
to explore the meaning of the Christian faith and its insights into 
problems college students face. The activities consist of vespers, 
Bible study, discussion groups, picnics, square dances, and special 
parties. 

All members of the student body are invited to join this 
organization. 

The Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship 

The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship aims to strengthen the 
spiritual lives of its members by the study of the Holy Scripture and 
by helping others to understand Jesus Christ as their personal 
Savior. 

Denominational Clubs 

Baptist Student Union 
Canterbury Club, for Episcopal students 
Christian Science Organization 
Jewish Students Association 
Lutheran Student Association 
Newman Club, for Catholic students 

United Campus Christian Fellowship, for Presbyterian, Dis- 
ciples of Christ, Evangelical United Brethren and United Church 
of Christ students 

Wesleyan Fellowship, for Methodist students 

MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

Concert Choir 

A group chosen by audition, the Concert Choir is a new musi- 
cal unit which offers concerts of advanced choral literature. 



31 



Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club is the male vocal organization on campus 
open to all male students. Its members present programs on campus 
and throughout the Maryland area that range from popular music 
and barbershop harmony to the lighter classics. 

Mixed Chorus 

The Mixed Chorus is a chorus composed of men and women 
of the College. This group performs at various college functions 
and on special occasions at off campus schools, churches, and on 
the radio. 

Orchestra 

Membership in the Concert Orchestra affords training in en- 
semble work for students who play orchestral instruments. The 
College Orchestra presents formal concerts at the College as well 
as at special college functions and programs. 

Student Christian Association Choir 

The Student Christian Association Choir is composed of resi- 
dent women students selected on the basis of talent and interest. 
The choir sings for various programs sponsored by the YM-YWCA 
and for college assemblies. In addition, the choir presents many 
concerts for churches and other organizations in the Baltimore area. 

DRAMATIC ORGANIZATION 

Glen Players 

The Glen Players, the College dramatic organization, offers an 
opportunity for those interested in all phases of dramatic produc- 
tion to display their talent. Actors, those preferring backstage work, 
and those interested in theatre in general are encouraged to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the gi-oup. 

The types of productions presented range from Greek drama 
to contemporary musicals and incorporate many aspects of dramatic 
talent. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 
The International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club is a student organization 
designed to acquaint students with the international problems and 
issues of the day. Members frequently attend meetings at different 
colleges in the vicinity and visit the United Nations headquarters. 
Membership is open to all students of the college. 

Naturalists 

The Naturalists is an organization which enables its members 
to enrich their scientific knowledge through field trips, lectures, and 



32 



discussion groups. It collects and organizes scientific material for 
educational aid. 

Student Education Association 

The Towson Chapter of the Student Education Association 
strives to familiarize its members with the various phases of educa- 
tion. Active membership in the organization requires a |2.00 fee 
which serves as a membership fee for the NEA and MSTA. SEA 
work on campus is directly concerned with work in the state organi- 
zation and sponsoring visiting days for high school FTA groups. 

Young Democrats 

This organization was formed to stimulate in young people an 
active interest in governmental affairs, to foster and perpetuate the 
ideals and principles of the Democratic Party, and to promote for 
our people through its administration the highest degree of justice 
and social welfare. 



ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

Every student enrolled at Towson is a member of either the 
Men's or Women's Athletic Association. 



Men's Athletic Association 

The College is a member of the Mason-Dixon Conference. The 
men's competitive teams include basketball, soccer, baseball, wres- 
tling, track, tennis, lacrosse and cross country. There are also oppor- 
tunities for participation in intramural activities. 

Women's Athletic Association 

Under the WAA an elective system is organized to give every 
student an opportunity to engage in the sports which she enjoys. 
Among the offerings are: hockey, soccer, tennis, archery, basketball, 
badminton, lacrosse, bowling, volleyball, softball, and swimming 
(also open to men students). With completion of each activity a 
student receives ten points and when enough points are accumu- 
lated, awards are presented. Besides the above activities, events 
with other colleges and intramural events are sponsored. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Talisman 

The Talisman is published under the auspices of the Student 
Government Association. Its purpose is to foster an interest in 
creative writing and to give an outlet to those students with crea- 
tive ability. 



33 



Tower Light 

The Tower Light is the weekly official student newspaper of 
the College, by the authority of the Student Government Associa- 
tion. 

Tower Echoes 

Tower Echoes is the yearbook sponsored by the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary dramatic fraternity, 
the purpose of which is to further and maintain interest in drama. 
Admission to the fraternity is by invitation and is based upon par- 
ticipation in the various phases of dramatic activity at Towson. 
The fraternity offers scholarships to deserving Towsonites to receive 
further study in some phase of dramatics. 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 

The Beta Delta Chapter of Gamma Theta Upsilon is a national 
honorary geography fraternity. The members of Gamma Theta 
Upsilon further their knowledge of geography through field trips, 
slide lectures, speakers and papers presented by members. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Epsilon Alpha Chapter is the local chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, 
a national honor society in education. Its purpose is to provide a 
full agenda of educational discussions, guest speakers, and services 
to the College and state. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Theta Beta is the Towson Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, na- 
tional honorary history fraternity. Students with better than a 3.00 
average in history and a general average of 3.00, are invited to 
membership. 



34 



THE COLLEGE CURRICULA 

All degree curricula of the college are based upon a funda- 
mental background of general studies. Fifty-two semester hours of 
liberal arts or general education courses are required of all students 
working toward the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts de- 
grees. Additional courses in general education are required of pros- 
pective elementary school teachers; all other students will acquire 
depth of understanding by developing a major in one field. 

SPECIALIZATION 

A major in academic fields is earned by completing about eight 
courses, generally, beyond the basic required courses in the chosen 
field— or about 35 credit hours of work, the exact amount being 
set by the various departments. Three possible benefits make the 
pursuit of a major course of study desirable: it prepares the stu- 
dent for graduate study in the field; it qualifies the graduate from 
the Teacher Education program to teach the subject in junior and 
senior high school; it prevents a possible too-wide dispersion of 
effort which would result in a lack of real competency in any 
branch of knowledge. 

Students may select a major from one of the following fields: 
Art, Biology, English, Speech and Drama, Elementary Education, 
Geography, History, Mathematics, and Physical Education. Majors 
are being developed in Modern Languages and other fields. Areas 
of concentration, providing less intensive specialization than a 
major, are offered in Elementary School Science, High School Sci- 
ence, Music, Psychology, Social Science, and Kindergarten-Primary 
and Elementary Education- A number of departments offer minors. 
The required hours of work are listed with the department course 
descriptions. 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements 
for graduation as set forth in the college catalogue. When the re- 
quirements are changed after a student has enrolled in the college, 
the student has the option of meeting in full the requirements that 
were in effect at the time of entrance or those that are in effect at 
the time of graduation. When the college withdraws former re- 
quired courses, the Admissions and Standards Committee will ap- 
prove substitutions for students graduating under the former re- 
quirements. The student's adviser assists in the planning of a pro- 
gram, but the final responsibility for meeting the requirements for 
graduation rests with the student. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS-BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND 
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREES 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements 
will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. College credit of one hundred twenty-eight semester hours. 

35 



2. Credit in the courses required of all students. 

3. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has 
elected. 

4. A major must be completed by all students in Arts and Sci- 
ences. Students in Teacher Education preparing to teach 
in junior or senior high school should qualify for a major 
or area of concentration. Students in the kindergarten- 
primary and elementary programs are encouraged but not 
required to have a major or concentration. 

5. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

6. Fulfillment of the speech requirement.* 

7. Certification by the college physician of physical fitness. 

8. Record of attendance at the college for at least one college 
year during which thirty semester hours of credit were 
earned. A student is expected to earn his final 30 credits 
at the college unless he receives special permission to the 
contrary. 

9. Demonstration of personal qualities which are expected of 
an educated person. 

10. A record of having taken the required sophomore and 
senior examinations or their approved equivalents. 

Those wishing to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree may do 
so by fulfilling the above requirements including two years or the 
equivalent of a modern foreign language. 

* Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking 
Speech 100, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, are required to 
satisfy the requirement of Speech 090, Corrective Speech, before 
being recommended for graduation. 



COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS 

For the B.S. Degree 

ART 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 

Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 100 2 credits 

English 204, 205 6 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Health Education 205 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 

Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic 204 . 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 101-102 2 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 

General Psychology 201 3 credits 

SCIENCE 

Biological Science 4 credits 

Physical Science 4 credits 

Another course approved by the Department 4 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History of Western Civilization 121-122 or History 
of the United States 221-222, plus six hours of 
additional social science credit 12 credits 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the College credit 

For the B.A. Degree 

The requirements for the B.S. Degree including 12 hours or the 
equivalent in one foreign language. 



37 



ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS 
IN KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY AND ELEMENTARY 

EDUCATION 

ART 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 

General College Mathematics 205 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 201-202 2 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Geography 103-104 (if 6 hours have not been taken 

in the 12 hours of social science requirements.) . 6 credits 



38 



PROGRAMS m TEACHER EDUCATION 

The supply of Towson graduates does not come close to meet- 
ing the demand for them. This in part reflects the current national 
shortage of teachers; it also reflects a special regard for Towson 
graduates in school systems throughout the State. 

Towson has been preparing teachers for the public schools of 
Maryland for over ninety years. Out of this long experience have 
come the present three programs for teachers, directed toward 
three grade-levels: kindergarten-primary (through the third 
grade), elementary (first through sixth grades), and secondary 
(seventh through twelfth grades). The necessary variations among 
them lie mainly in the required professional courses— that is, those 
courses concerned with understanding children, educational theory, 
and classroom techniques. 

These professional courses, comprising about twenty per cent 
of the four years' work, consist of roughly two-thirds classwork at 
the College and one-third experiences, including student teaching, 
in the classrooms of neighboring public school systems. 

The remaining work is given over to studies of a general na- 
ture—in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sci- 
ences—providing a well-rounded college education, as well as neces- 
sary background in the subject the student will eventually teach. 
Certain basic courses are required, assuring foundations in all 
broad areas of knowledge; but even among these there are frequent 
choices, and beyond them is the opportunity for electives that 
make possible the pursuit of special interests. 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

A graduate program leading to the Master of Education degree 
is offered for experienced elementary school teachers. See page 132 
for a description of the program. 



TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

Each graduate of a teacher education program at Towson will 
be qualified for state certification at the kindergarten-primary, ele- 
mentary, junior high school, or senior high level. The Standard 
Professional Certificate is issued for three years at graduation and 
is renewable for seven years upon completion of six semester hours 
of graduate or advanced undergraduate courses. A master's degree 
or "equivalent" is required for further renewal. Certification to 
teach in Baltimore City is based in part upon the passing of a 
professional examination. 



39 



COURSES REQUIRED IN EDUCATION 

Kindergarten-Primary Division 

hours 

Introduction to Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

Professional Block I 333 (Art, Music, Physical Education, 

Science) 6 

Professional Block II 334 (Social Living, Science, Reading 

and Other Language Arts) 3 

Professional Block III 335 (Mathematics, Science, Advanced 

Reading, and Curriculum Development) 5 

Student Teaching 390 10 

Foundations of Education 410 2 

Elementary Division 

Introduction to Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

Overview of Education 360 2 

The Teaching of Science and Social Studies 362 3 

The Teaching of Arithmetic 363 2 

The Teaching of Reading and Other Language Arts 364 3 

♦Art or Music or Physical Education Methods 371, 372, 373 

(Two are to be taken) 4 

Student Teaching 390 10 

Foundations of Education 410 2 

Secondary Division 

Introduction to Teaching 105 1 

Human Growth and Learning 203 3 

Principles of Secondary Education 381 3 

Methods in Major Subject 383, 384, 386, 387, 389, 

392, 395, 396, 451 2 

Audio-Visual Laboratory 391 1 

Student Teaching 390 10 

Foundations of Education 410 2 

SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

Sequence of courses for the degree in Kindergarten-Primary, 
Elementary and Secondary Education are outlined on the following 
pages. Alternate arrangements of courses— Pattern A and Pattern B 
—are suggested for the guidance of all students. Transfer students 
and others unable to meet graduation requirements under the 
regular patterns must first consult with their major adviser and 
then plan curriculum patterns during their first semester at the 
College in conference with the director of their professional divi- 
sion. 



Students in Elementary Education will be assigned to two of the 
three methods courses in Art, Music, or Physical Education after 
an analysis of their individual needs. 



40 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 
16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121. 103, or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design. ... 2 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching. . . 1 
6.103 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.102 Physical Education I 

30.122, 104, or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses* * 5 to 7 

Total 15 to 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 



hours 



6.204 English Literature 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

30.103. 121 or 221 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses* * 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 



hours 



3 11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

Music Fundamentals 2 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

30.104, 122 or 222 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



13.203 
16.202 
20.201 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

5.333 Professional Block 1 6 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

5.334 Professional Block II 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

*Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

5.335 Professional Block III 5 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 

Total 15 



Semester II 

hours 
5.410 Foundations of Education .. . 2 

6.205 English Literature 3 

♦Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



41 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design.... 2 
6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.103, 121, or 221 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching. . . 1 
6.103 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.104, 122, or 222 Geography or 

History 3 

*Science 4 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 



hours 



6.204 English Literature 
13.203 
16.201 
20.201 



Music Fundamentals 2 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

5.333 Professional Block 1 6 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** to 2 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 



hours 



II. 



5.334 Professional Block 
11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses : 3 to 5 

Total. ; 15 to 17 



Sem,ester II 

hours 

5.335 Professional Block III 5 

5,390 Student Teaching 10 

Total 15 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

5.410 Foundations of Education. . . 2 

6.205 English Literature 3 

30.121, 221, or 103 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 5 to 7 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 



hours 



•Science 4 

30.122, 222, or 104 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be 
supplied by faculty advisers. 

Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language or 
a course needed for a major is preferred. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before complet- 
ing freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a course 
in the department. 



,42 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

D.090 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

17.103 Fundamentals of Biology... 4 
30.121, 221 or 103 History or 

Geography 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design.... 2 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching... 1 
6.103 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.122. 222 or 104 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses* * 6 or 7 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 



6.204 English Literature 3 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

30.103, 121 or 221 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 
hours hours 

. . . . 3 8.205 Health 2 

...3 11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.104, 122 or 222 Geography or 

History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 3 to 5 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 
Semester I Semester II 



hours 

5.360 Overview of Education 2 

5.363 Arithmetic Methods 2 

5.371, 372. 373 Art or Music or 
Physical Education 

Methods (Take 2) 4 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



hours 
5.362 The Teaching of Science 

and Social Studies 3 

5.364 The Teaching of Reading 

and Other Language Arts. 3 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 

Total 16 



1.203 
6.205 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

Art in the Culture 2 

English Literature 3 

•Science 4 

Electives 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
5.410 Foundations of Education. . . 2 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

•Science 4 

Electives 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



43 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design... 2 
6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121, 103 or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

Electives** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



5.105 

6.103 

16.102 

17.103 



Semester II 

hours 
Introduction to Teaching. . . 1 



Composition and Literature. 3 

Physical Education 1 

Fundamentals of Biology. . . 4 
30.122, 104 or 222 History or 

Geography 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Electives** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

16.201 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.103, 121 or 221 Geography or 

History 3 

Elective or Major 

Course** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



Semester II 

hours 

11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

30.104, 122 or 222 Geography or 

History 3 

Elective or Major 

Course** 3 or 5 

Total 15 or 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 

Semester I Semester II 

hours hours 



6.204 English Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



5.360 Overview of Education 2 

5.363 Arithmetic Methods 2 

5.371, 372, 373 Art or Music or 
Physical Education 

Methods (Take 2) 4 

6.205 English Literature 3 

Electives 4 to 6 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

5.362 The Teaching of Science 

and Social Studies 3 

5.364 The Teaching of Reading 

and Other Language Arts. 3 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 

Total 16 



Semester II 

hours 
5.410 Foundations of Education. . . 2 

♦Science 4 

Electives** 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be 
supplied by faculty advisers. 

Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language or 
a course needed for a major is preferred. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before complet- 
ing freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a course 
in the department. 



44 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121 or 221 History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching*** 1 
6.103 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.103 Fundamentals of Biology. . . 4 

30.122 or 222 History 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Elective or Major 

Course** 2 or 3 

Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

6.204 English Literature 3 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Education*** 3 

♦Science 4 

♦Social Science 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 5 to 7 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 

♦Methods 2 

5.391 Audio-Visual 1 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN A 



Semester I 

hours 

5.410 Foundations of Education ... 2 

♦Science 4 

♦Social Science 3 

Electives 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

6.205 English Literature 3 

Electives 12 to 14 

Total 15 to 17 



45 



FRESHMAN YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

6.102 Composition and Literature. 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

17.103 Fundamentals of Biology. . . 4 

30.121 or 221 History 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching*** 1 
6.103 Composition and Literature. 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.122 or 222 History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 5 to 7 

Total 15 to 17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 

hours 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

6.204 English Literature 3 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic 3 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses** 7 to 9 

Total 15 to 17 



JUNIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 



Semester I 



hours 

... 4 



♦Science 

♦Social Science 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 8 to 10 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester II 

hours 

6.205 English Literature 3 

5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Education*** 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



Semester I 

hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 

5.391 Audio- Visual 1 

•Methods 2 

Electives 2 to 4 

Total 15 to 17 



SENIOR YEAR-PATTERN B 

Semester II 

hours 

•Science 4 

*Social Science 3 

5.410 Foundations of Education. . . 2 

Electives 6 to 8 

Total 15 to 17 



• Statements explaining choice of courses to be taken at this time will be 
supplied by faculty advisers. 

*• Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language or 
a course needed for a major is preferred. 

••*Students in their last two years who have not taken 5.105 Introduction to 
to Teaching, should substitute Principles of Secondary Education (5.381a) for 
4 credits to make up their required hours in Education. However, those 
transferring from other colleges should take Introduction to Teaching unless 
they have had a similar course. 

Note: Students planning to concentrate in certain departments (such as art, 
mathematics, science) will have the advice of that department before complet- 
ing freshman registration. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a course 
in the department. 



46 



THE PROGRAM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The program of Arts and Sciences at Towson offers opportun- 
ities of higher education to qualified high school graduates who are 
interested in vocational goals other than teaching. Since 1946 
Towson has had a two-year liberal arts program. Students may now 
follow a four-year program that will lead to either the B.A. or the 
B.S. degree in arts and sciences. These students may decide after 
one or two years to transfer to a teacher education program, to a 
university or professional school for specialized work, or remain to 
complete the four-year course with a major in one of several fields. 

Although a number of the courses required of all students are 
taken the first year, opportunity is provided for the student to 
select one or two courses in which he has a special interest. The 
following program of study is suggested for the freshman year: 

English Composition and Literature, 6 semester hours 
History of Western Civilization or 
History of the United States, 6 semester hours 
Fundamentals of Biology or Physical Science, 

8 semester hours 
Fundamentals of Public Speaking or 
Music Appreciation, 2 semester hours 
Art in the Culture or Health Education, 2 semester hours 
Orientation, semester hours 
Electives, 6 to 10 semester hours 
A foreign language should be elected by those wishing to 

earn a B.A. rather than a B.S. degree. 

Students in Arts and Sciences are to select a major and meet 
other graduation requirements listed on page 35. 

PREPARATION FOR CAREERS 

Students in Arts and Sciences may pursue courses leading to 
further preparation for a variety of careers. In some professions, 
such as law and medicine, it is usually advisable to complete a four- 
year liberal arts course before beginning professional study. In 
others, like engineering, students should plan to transfer to a pro- 
fessional school after one or two years unless the professional 
school's admission plan permits a longer period of preprofessional 
study. 

Those who decide it is appropriate to enter professional study 
at the end of one or two years should study carefully the catalogue 
of the institution to which they wish to transfer in order that they 
may select the Towson courses required for admission to this pro- 
fessional program. 



47 



Students planning to transfer to another accredited college or 
university will usually find that the suggested Towson freshman 
program prepares them for sophomore programs elsewhere. How- 
ever, because of the differences in the curricular plans of any two 
colleges, students contemplating transfer should seek the aid of 
their advisers in making their freshman courses as nearly identical 
as possible with those of the first year of the college to which trans- 
fer is planned. The same procedure should be followed by students 
wishing to transfer after two years. 

Students who look forward to graduate work should make early 
selection of the school they hope to enter in order that they may 
meet the entrance requirements of the chosen institution. Current 
catalogues of graduate and professional schools are on file in the 
Admissions Office, and the Dean of Students has additional data on 
opportunities for advanced study, including available fellowships 
and scholarships. 

The following paragraphs outline how the liberal arts cur- 
riculum can provide basic preparation for several vocations. Stu- 
dents may obtain further information from their advisers and from 
the chairman of the department in which the major or most of the 
preparatory study is to be taken. 

College Teaching 

Since many colleges consider experience in elementary or sec- 
ondary school teaching an important part of preparation for college 
teaching, the Teacher Education program at Towson is appropri- 
ate for those planning for teaching at the college level. The student 
should also build a strong undergraduate major in his chosen field 
and prepare for graduate study that leads eventually to a doctor's 
degree. It is possible to prepare directly for college teaching, and 
university graduate programs are being organized to meet this vo- 
cational objective. Opportunities for teaching in college are grow- 
ing with multiplying college enrollments. 

Students interested in the following vocational fields will find 
an appropriate major in one of the social sciences or humanities 
such as history, English, or psychology: 

Business 

A four-year course with a major in mathematics and electives 
in economics provides a general background for the individual in- 
terested in a business career. If a more specialized preparation is 
desired, the student may wish to elect College Algebra and Mathe- 
matics of Finance and transfer after one year to a university school 
of business administration. 

Journalism 

A desirable undergraduate preparation for a journalistic career 
consists of a broad program of arts and sciences with a major in 



48 



English, history, or social sciences. Courses should be elected in 
several departments to supplement those required of all students. 
Specific acquaintance with newspaper writing and editing should 
be gained through the basic course in news writing and from serv- 
ice on the staffs of the college publications. 

Law 
Students planning to apply for admission to a college of law 
should make an excellent academic record in a wide variety of 
liberal arts work. Their objectives should be ability in thinking, 
writing, speaking, understanding of people, and broad knowledge 
of United States political and economic life, Anglo-American con- 
stitutional history, and of literature, sociology, and philosophy. Ad- 
mission to a law school is sometimes granted superior students after 
two or three years of undergraduate work, but a college degree is 
usually required for admission. 

Library Work 
Prospective librarians should plan for a four-year program of 
Arts and Sciences followed by a one-year graduate course in a 
school accredited by the American Library Association. A good 
undergraduate record and a reading knowledge of at least one 
foreign language are customary requirements for admission to a 
degree program in Library Science. Prospective librarians may pre- 
pare for positions in which they would work primarily in the sub- 
ject matter area of their special interest. At present there are more 
positions for school and college librarians than qualified candidates. 

Ministry 
In addition to complete devotion to his vocation, the prospec- 
tive minister, priest, or rabbi should possess or acquire academic 
ability, sympathy for and skill in working with people, facility in 
writing and speaking, and broad knowledge in several fields. As a 
college student he should be active in his church or synagogue and 
in a campus religious organization. A four-year course in Arts and 
Sciences is required for admission by most theological schools. Most 
of the eight or more years of study for the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood takes place in a seminary. More information may be sought 
from the student's minister, priest, or rabbi. 

Social Work 
Although social welfare agencies employ many individuals who 
have a four-year college education, leaders in the field consider two 
years of graduate education desirable. Undergraduate courses sug- 
gested include economics, political science, history, psychology, 
sociology, statistics, biological sciences, English composition, public 
speaking, and news writing. Volunteer service with youth serving 
organizations, and summer employment in social agencies, are 
recommended for the college student interested in this vocation. 



49 



. PREPROFESSIONAL PATTERNS 

Students interested in the following careers will find appropri- 
ate undergraduate specialization in the natural sciences or mathe- 
matics: 

Engineering 

Second only to teaching in the number of professional workers, 
engineering calls for specialization in one of approximately twenty 
areas. All of them require ability in mathematics and science, and 
study in these fields should be carried on through high school. One 
or two years of college work in Arts and Sciences may be taken in 
basic pre-engineering subjects. Those interested should check with 
the engineering school of their choice or its catalogue before en- 
rolling in pre-engineering courses. 

Medicine, Dentistry 
Because of the keen competition for admission to schools of 
medicine and dentistry and the broad background desired, a four- 
year college course is preferred over a shorter period of preprofes- 
sional study. A few superior students may gain admission to a 
medical or dental school after two or three years of general college 
work. Basic requirements of a number of medical and dental 
schools would be met by a Towson student completing a major in 
biology plus two years of chemistry, and one year of English, mathe- 
matics, physics, and French or German. Electives may be chosen 
in health education, social sciences, English, and fine arts. 

The following preprofessional patterns are suggested for con- 
sideration along with the requirements listed in catalogues of the 
universities in which the student is interested: 

Pre-Engineering Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, 

First Year PrE-PharmaCY 

Sem. Hrs. first Year 

Orientation, 090 Sem. Hrs. 

Eng. 102-103, Composition & Orientation, 090 



Literature 6 



Eng. 102-103, Composition & 



Speech 100, Public Speaking 2 Literature 6 

Math. Ill, College Algebra 3 Math. Ill, College Algebra. ........ 3 

Math. 112, Trigonometry 3 Math. 112, Trigonometry ; . . 3 

Math. 113, Analytical Geometry. ... 3 Math. 113, Analytical Geometry. ... 3 

Sci. 206-207, General Chemistry 8 sci. 120, Zoology 1 4 

P.E. 101-102, Physical Education. ... 2 Sci. 22o', Zoology II 4 

Electives 5 to 9* Sci. 206-207, General Chemistry. ... 8 

P.E. 101-102, Physical Education. . . . 2 

32 to 36x Electives to 3** 

• Choose from Soc. Sci. 201, Intro, to 

Sociology; Soc. Sci. 202, Econ. Prin.; 33 to 36x 

Soc. Sci. 206, Gov't of the U. S.; *# choose from Soc. Sci. 206, Gov't of 

Psych. 201, Gen. Psychology; Health the U. S.; Soc. Sci. 201, Intro, to 

205, Health Ed. Sociology; Psych. 201, Gen. Psychol- 

X Students with adequate backgrounds ogy; Speech 100, Public Speaking. 

may carry 18 hours per semester. x Students with adequate backgrounds 

may carry 18 hours per semester. 

50. 



Forestry 

Broadly educated men, interested in outdoor life and possess- 
ing a strong background in the biological sciences, particularly 
botany, are desired by the university schools of forestry. One year 
of pre-forestry study, planned with the aid of a biologist and in 
accordance with requirements of the forestry school to which appli- 
cation is being made, may be taken at Towson. 

Nursing, Medical Technology 
Similar liberal arts work is recommended as preparation for 
professional study in these two fields, particularly if the individual 
is interested in the additional vocational opportunities available to 
those earning a B.A. or B.S. degree. A major in biology is suggested 
for those planning to earn a college degree. 

For those taking preprofessional work prior to studying medical 
technology, a three-year course is the recommended minimum. This 
is followed by twelve months of clinical training in a hospital. 

Prospective nurses interested in a college degree may take a 
two-year pre-nursing program at Towson. The following pre- 
nursing pattern is suggested: 

Pre-Nursing 

First Year Second Year 

Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. 

Orientation, 090 Eng. 204, 205, English Literature. . . 6 

Eng. 102-103. Composition & Speech 218, Adv. Public Speaking. . . 3 

Literature 6 Sci. 206-207, General Chemistry. ... 8 

Speech 100, Public Speaking 2 Soc. Sci. 121-122 Western Civiliza- 

Sci. 120, Zoology 1 4 tion (or Soc. Sci. 221-222, 

Sci. 220, Zoology II U. S. History) 6 

(or Sci. 318. Microbiology) 4 p.E, 201-202, Physical Education 2 

Soc. Sci. 201, Intro, to Sociology 3 Electives 7 to 9* 

P.E. 101-102, Physical Education 2 

Electives 11 to 13* Total 32 to 34 



Total 32 to 34 * Choose from courses such as Social 

• Choose from courses such as: Art in Psychology. Introduction to Anthro- 

the Culture, General Mathematics or pology. Modem Language (French, 

College Algebra. Health Education, German, Spanish), or any elective in 

Modem Language (French. German. the first year list. 
Spanish), Music Appreciation. 

CHANGING PROGRAMS 

Because the Teacher Education and Arts and Sciences pro- 
grams are similar in their first two years of work and because of the 
flexibility afforded by the elective portion of the Teacher Education 
program, transfer from Arts and Sciences to Teacher Education 
without loss of time or credit is usually possible at the end of 
either the freshman or sophomore year. 

Transfer from Teacher Education to Arts and Sciences is also 
possible, but for Maryland residents this entails reimbursement to 
the State in the amount of $100 for each semester of work completed 
in the Teacher Education program. 

51 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

The college calendar, which will be found on pages (5) and 
(6), indicates the dates when students must register. Students 
are not permitted to attend classes without having completed regis- 
tration, and a fee is assessed for registration after the time assigned 
(see Expenses, page (19). In addition to payment of the fee, stu- 
dents who register later than one week after the first day of classes 
must secure permission from the Committee on Admissions and 
Standards. 

TRANSFERRED CREDIT 

Credit is accepted for courses completed at other colleges and 
universities if the final mark is C or the equivalent. This work will 
count as credit toward graduation, but the grade will not be used 
in computing the average for graduation. 

STUDENT LOAD 
The normal student load is 15 to 17 semester hours of credit 
each semester. Permission to deviate from these hours may be 
sought from the Dean of Students. Approval for a reduced load 
is often granted for appropriate personal reasons. Permission is 
usually granted for 18 semester hours if the student has a cumula- 
tive average of 2.50 and for 19 hours if the average is 3.00 or better. 

Students who are on academic probation, who have health 
problems, or who are carrying heavy programs of work outside of 
the college may be urged by the Dean of Students to carry less than 
a normal load of classes. Blanks for requesting permission to carry 
fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained in the Regis- 
trar's Office. 

AUDITING COURSE 

A student may audit a course according to the following plan: 
If he is a full-time student he makes application at the end of the 
first meeting of the class to add this course to his program, using 
the change of course blank obtainable in the Registrar's Office. 
Permission will be granted by the Dean of Instruction to register 
as an auditor, if there is room in the class and if this addition will 
not constitute an excessive load. No credit may be earned in courses 
which are audited, and auditors are not permitted to take examina- 
tions or receive grades. 

Individuals not registered as full-time students will follow the 
same procedure excepting that they will pay the established charge 
of 115.00 per credit hour. (Full-time students are not assessed addi- 
tional fees for any overloads they may be permitted to carry.) 

CHANGE OF COURSE OR SCHEDULE 

The Chairmen of departments consider requests for course 
changes during the first week of classes each semester; thereafter, 
requests for changes are made to the Dean of Students. 



52 



Changes in courses which run less than the normal semester, 
must be made no later than the last day of the first quarter of 
the inclusive time period for the course; if withdrawal is requested 
after the end of the change period, a mark of Pass or Fail will be 
given by the instructor for the course. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified according to the number of semester 
hours completed as follows: freshmen, to 30 semester hours; 
sophomores, 30 to 60 semester hours; juniors, 60 to 90 semester 
hours; seniors, 90 semester hours, or above. 

MARKING AND POINT SYSTEM 

A five-point marking system (A, B, C, D, F) is used to indicate 
quality of academic work. The letter A designates work of superior 
quality; B, work of quality substantially better than minimum re- 
quirement for graduation; C, work of satisfactory quality meeting 
the minimum requirements for graduation; D, work of less than 
satisfactory quality but allowable for credit, subject to the restric- 
tions specified under Degree Requirements, page (36); F, work of 
such unsatisfactory quality that no credit is given. 

A mark of Inc. (incomplete because of illness or other reason 
beyond control of the student) at the end of a semester carries no 
credit. Unless such a course is satisfactorily completed within three 
weeks after the Inc. is received, the grade for the course becomes F. 

The mark given for a course which carries no credit will be 
S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). 

The five-point marking system used, with the numerical points 
assigned to each grade, is as follows: 

A, 4 points 

B, 3 points 

C, 2 points 

D, 1 point 

F, points (failure). 

There are no plus or minus grades. 

The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in 
that course, then totaling the credit hours and points for all courses 
taken in the semester, and dividing the total number of points by 
the total number of hours of credit. For example, a student receives 
these grades on the cards enclosed: 

A in 1 course of 4 hours credit 

B in 1 course of 3 hours credit and in 1 course of 1 hour credit 

C in 1 course of 3 hours credit 

D in 1 course of 3 hours credit 

F in 1 course of 2 hours credit 



53 



The computation would be as follows: 

4 hours of A (4 points each) 16 points 

4 hours of B (3 points each) 12 points 

3 hours of C (2 points each) 6 points 

3 hours of D (1 point each) 3 points 

2 hours of F (0 points each) points 

16 total hours 37 total points 

Dividing 37 by 16, the student's grade-point average for this 
semester is found to be 2.31. 

A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required for gradua- 
tion. An average of better than 3.00 is usually worthy of special 
mention. 

STANDARDS OF WORK REQUIRED 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain at least 
the following cumulative averages: Freshmen, 1.70; Sophomores, 
1.80; Juniors, 1.90; Seniors, 2.00. Students are placed on probation 
when the cumulative average is below the minimum standard for 
their class. 

Probation indicates uncertainty on the part of the college as 
to the student's probable success. Probation is lifted when the stu- 
dent shows satisfactory improvement in his work. A probationary 
student who fails to show such improvement may be asked to leave 
the college. A student on strict probation is required to withdraw 
at the end of that term unless a substantial improvement in the 
grade-point average is attained. The complete records of such stu- 
dents are reviewed by the Committee on Admissions and Standards 
at the close of each semester. 

Failure in a course usually delays graduation from the college. 
However, a student may attend a summer session here or with the 
permission of the Committee on Admissions and Standards attend 
elsewhere and transfer the earned credit to the college. As a rule a 
student may not repeat a course more than once. 

Students in the liberal arts program who expect to transfer 
to another institution with advanced standing should maintain 
grades of C or higher in each course attempted, since, ordinarily, 
institutions of higher learning do not accept courses in which a 
grade of less than C has been earned. 

Entering students who are defective in speech and/or hearing 
are referred to the Speech Division for testing and required to take 
a course in Corrective Speech. 

Freshmen are required to take a course in Fundamentals of 
Public Speaking. Exemption from the required course is granted if 
the student passes a performance test given by two members of the 



54 



Speech Division. The performance test must be taken before the 
end of the first week of the course in Fundamentals of Speech. 
Those who thus quahfy for exemption may choose an advanced 
course in speech or an elective in another field. 

Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking 
Speech 100, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, are required to 
satisfy the requirements of Speech 090, Corrective Speech, before 
being recommended for graduation. 

In general a student is eligible to enter the student teaching 
semester when (a) he has completed English 102, 103, and Speech 
100; (b) he has completed all professional prerequisites and has 
achieved a cumulative average appropriate to his classification 
(see Standards of Work Required, page (54); (c) he has received 
the approval of the director of his division. However, a student who 
makes one or more "D" or "F" grades in professional courses pre- 
ceding student teaching will not be permitted to enter student 
teaching. If the student is permitted to remain in the college, he 
must repeat the professional courses in which he received "D" or 
"F" grades. 

The personal development of each student is considered. The 
college may exercise its right to ask a student to withdraw at any 
time. 

ATTENDANCE 

A student-faculty attendance committee, responsible to the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards, administers the college 
attendance policy. 

The college attendance policy places responsibility on the stu- 
dent for attending classes and for filing reasons for necessary absence 
from classes. Students should file within 48 hours after their return 
to college, on the official blank, a record of each absence except 
those for college-sponsored events. A record of absence for medical 
reasons will be filed at the Health Center. A record of absence for 
personal reasons will be filed at Stephens Hall in Room 109. 

No absences are permitted on the day preceding or the day fol- 
lowing a holiday except by prior approval of the Attendance Com- 
mittee. No absences from final examinations are permitted except 
by prior approval of the Attendance Committee. Absences from 
examinations because of emergency illness or accident should be 
reported to the Office of the Dean of Students immediately by tele- 
phone. All students are reminded that unexcused absence from a 
final examination constitutes a failure in the examination. 

LENGTH OF ATTENDANCE 

Only in unusual cases may a student remain in the college for 
longer than eight semesters. Any requests for deviation from this 
plan must be submitted to the Admissions and Standards Commit- 
tee a month prior to the end of a semester. 



55 



WITHDRAWALS 

A student wishing to withdraw should see the Dean of Stu- 
dents, who will provide the form necessary to make the withdrawal 
official. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of a student's record will be sent to other educa- 
tional institutions and organizations only upon written request of 
the student concerned. The first transcript is issued free of charge. 
A charge of one dollar is made for each subsequent transcript and 
should be enclosed with the request. A supplement of one semes- 
ter's work only will be furnished for fifty cents. Upon a student's 
graduation a transcript is sent to the Maryland State Department 
of Education. When requested, transcripts are sent to the Balti- 
more City Department of Education. No charge is made at any 
time for transcripts sent to either of these departments in Maryland. 
One copy of the student's record marked "not an official transcript" 
is furnished free to the student upon graduation. At any time, a 
student may have an official copy on written request and payment 
of one dollar. It is not the policy of the college to issue official 
transcripts directly to students and graduates. 

A student who withdraws from the Teacher Education pro- 
gram before graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose of 
continuing his college education must first reimburse the college for 
whatever education he has received tuition-free (see Liability For 
Unpaid Tuition, page (21). 



56 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THE MEANING OF COURSE NUMBERS 

Each department of the college has a code number, shown in 
parentheses at the head of the department announcement. 
Each course has a distinctive number, with the following sig- 
nificance: Courses numbered 100-199 inclusive are primarily 
for freshmen, 200-299 primarily for sophomores, 300-399 pri- 
marily for juniors, and 400-499 primarily for seniors. Stu- 
dents may register for courses one level above or one level 
below their classification. Seniors are expected to confine 
themselves to 300 courses and higher, unless the curriculum 
pattern for the degree specifies particular 200 courses in the 
senior year. 

Courses for which college credit is not given are assigned a 
number lower than 100. 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a 
hyphen are to be taken in sequence throughout a year. When 
course numbers are separated by a comma, either semester may 
be taken independently of the other. 

"a" COURSES 
For all courses numbered with the addition of the letter "a" 
the following explanation applies: for the additional credit 
hour, students are required to do extra work in areas of special 
interest under direction of the instructor. 

Permission to register for any course carrying the letter "a" 
must be obtained from the instructor of the course at registra- 
tion time only. A student electing the additional hour credit 
may not change the value of the course after the first week 
of the semester or the equivalent thereof in teaching time. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 
Students majoring in the various areas will need to choose their 
electives with extreme care. Before registering for courses 
which are not required students should consult their advisers. 
The advice of the instructor in the course or the chairman of 
the department in which the elective course is listed may need 
to be sought before a wise decision is made concerning the 
choice of an elective. 

TIME OF OFFERING 
A course is offered every semester of every year, unless the 
semester or the semester and year of offering is specified. All 
non-required courses are offered subject to sufficient enrollment. 

CREDIT VALUE OF COURSES 
The semester credit value of the course is indicated in the line 
following the title. 



57 



NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES (0) 

Courses for which there is no organized department in the 
college are: 

090 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE 

1 hour per week for one semester. (No credit.) 

An introduction for students in Arts and Sciences and Teacher 
Education to social and academic aspects of college living; individ- 
ual and group guidance leading to more effective use of the educa- 
tional opportunities offered by the college. 

Lectures and discussions dealing with study habits, budgeting 
of time, note-taking, reading skills; rules and regulations of the 
college, grading system, graduation requirements, and career oppor- 
tunities. 

095 ORIENTATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS IN 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 

(No credit.) 

Group activities during Orientation Week; individual counsel- 
ing thereafter. 

401 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

$ hours per week. (Credit S hours.) 

A study of issues and movements in contemporary philosophy 
in the light of representative thinkers of the major schools of 
thought, and a consideration of their significance. A critical exam- 
ination of influential works. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have had History 121 or its 
equivalent, and to graduate students, by permission of the instruc- 
tor. 



58 



ART (1) 

*MR. FENDELL, MR. GUILLAUME, MR. MILLER, MR. MIT- 
CHELL, MR. NASS, *MR. NESBITT, MR. POLLACK (Chair- 
man), *MRS. STANTON, MISS ZINDLER. 

(* Temporary) 

The art courses are planned to provide students with a means 
of self expression, to contribute to an understanding of the function 
of design in shaping the environment, and to stimulate the growth 
of appreciation in the visual arts. The department provides a major 
and a minor in art and a major program leading to certification in 
art education. 

Arts and Sciences students and all Teacher Education students 
are required to include in their program 1.203 Art in the Culture. 
Elementary Education students are required to take, in addition, 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design, and may be required to take 5.371 
Art and the Child. 

MAJOR IN ART 

All students who wish to earn a major or a minor in art must 
register with the Art Department as early as possible during their 
first year at Towson. 

The purposes of a major in art are to provide a background for 
personal creativity, to prepare for graduate work in art, and to pro- 
vide a foundation for a career in art. 

Required courses are: 1.103 Fundamentals of Design, 1.203 
Art in the Culture, 1.210 Drawing and the Appreciation of Draw- 
ing, 1.340 Sculpture, 1.331 Ceramic Workshop, 1.321 History of Art: 
Ancient through Renaissance, 1.322 History of Art: Baroque 
through Contemporary, and 1.329 Painting. 

The total of required and elective art credits must be 34 to 
40. The Art Department may require upper-class students to under- 
take independent study from an individually selected bibliography. 
An average of B or better must be maintained in art courses. 

For students who wish a certificate in art education on the 
elementary and secondary levels, required courses are the same as 
those listed above plus the following: 1.325 Advertising Design 
and Commercial Art, 5.376 The Teaching of Art (Elementary 
School), or 5.396 The Teaching of Art (Secondary School), and 
5.390 Student Teaching (in Art). 

103 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An investigation of line, form, color, texture, spatial relation- 
ships. 



59 



203 ART IN THE CULTURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A study of design in architecture, craft, and plastic and graphic 
arts of contemporary civilizations. The interaction between these 
and other forces which mold the culture. The expressive possibil- 
ities of many materials. Required of all students. 

210 DRAWING AND THE APPRECIATION OF DRAWING 

3 hours per week. [Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

An investigation of the problems of expressive draftsmanship 
in theory and practice, 

305 THE ART OF PUPPETRY AND MARIONETTE 
PRODUCTION 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

306 ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

The study of basic ideas underlying the organization of space 
and materials for human needs. Lectures, slides, and field trips will 
be used to convey both contemporary and historical aspects of the 
design of residences, schools, public, commercial, and industrial 
buildings. 

Prerequisite: 203. 

310 THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

A study of the design of forms in space. Work with varied 
materials and tools. Discussion, lecture, and studio work. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

310a THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Same as above with additional advanced problems. 

314 THE ART OF ENAMELING ON METAL 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Not offered 1962-63. 

A practical acquaintance with the essentials of design as ap- 
plied to the art of enameling on copper and silver. The apprecia- 
tion of master works of enameling from medieval to contemporary 
times. 

Prerequisite: 103 and 203. 



60 



320 EXHIBITION TECHNIQUES 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Not offered 1962-63. 

Materials, techniques, and methods for the aesthetic presenta- 
tion of educative materials for all levels of teaching. The design of 
bulletin boards, exhibit spaces, display tables, and the staging of 
assembly and holiday programs. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of instructor. 

320a SAME AS 320. 4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 
Additional advanced problems. 

321 THE HISTORY OF ART: ANCIENT THROUGH 
RENAISSANCE 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1964-65. 

The development of art theory, forms and materials as seen 
in historical perspective. Readings, museum trips and research. 
Emphasis upon Renaissance art and its origins in ancient and 
medieval forms. 

322 HISTORY OF ART: BAROQUE THROUGH 
CONTEMPORARY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

The origins of contemporary art as revealed by the seventeenth, 
eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Museum trips and study of 
contemporary collections. 

325 ADVERTISING DESIGN AND COMMERCIAL ART 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Problems in advertising design and commercial art with em- 
phasis on the creative approach. Line, halftone, and color as 
elements of visual communication and layout. Application of draw- 
ing, painting, and design experiences to the field of illustration. 
Principles of lettering and study of typography. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

329, 330 PAINTING 

4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours each semester.) First Semester 

1962-63. 

A general studio course emphasizing expression in painting. 
Many media are investigated and different theories of painting ex- 
plored through lecture, discussion and individual work. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

331, 332 CERAMICS 

3 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours each semester.) First Semester 
1962-63. 

61 



The creative possibilities of ceramic materials. Lectures and 
discussions on materials, technique, and design. Museum trips. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

340, 341 SCULPTURE 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours each semester.) Second 
Semester 1962-63. 

Introduction to the materials of sculpture, and an investigation 
of their special qualities as they relate to the creative process. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

351-352 GRAPHICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

Study and practice of printing as a creative art. Drawing and 
printing; lectures, demonstrations, and criticisms. First semester: 
woodblock and etching. Second semester: lithography and silk- 
screen. 

Prerequisite: 210 or permission of instructor. 

371 ART AND THE CHILD 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Also credited as Education 371. 

The major considerations of art education appropriate to the 
work of the elementary teacher. Experiences in planning and 
teaching art. Work in classroom and workshop. Discussion and 
demonstrations. (A similar course for 3 credits is listed as Educa- 
tion 371a in the summer session bulletin.) 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

376 THE TEACHING OF ART-ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Also credited as Education 376. See 396, which follows, for 
description. 

396 THE TEACHING OF ART-SECONDARY SCHOOL 

Also credited as Education 396. 
3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester each year. 

A study of the philosophy underlying art education at all levels, 
of the function of the art specialist, and materials and skills. Con- 
current courses, differentiated work according to the teaching level 
preferred. 

Prerequisite: 103 and permission of the instructor. 

414-415 SPECIAL ART PROBLEMS 



62 



$ to 6 hours per week. {Credit 2 to 4 hours.) Second Semester 
1962-63. 

Practice for advanced students in their fields of special interest. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and a course in the field 
of special interest. 

435 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 
4 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Also credited as Education 435. 

A study of major art education problems at all levels. Materials 
and skills in relation to classroom needs. Participation with chil- 
dren in the developing, planning, and carrying through of projects. 

Prerequisite: 371. 



63 



EDUCATION (5) 

MR. ABENDROTH, MISS BELLOWS, MISS BRAMBLETT, 
MISS BROYLES (Chairman), MR. BURRIER, MISS CIMINO, 
MR. CORNTHWAITE, MISS FITZGERALD, MR. HARTLEY, 
MISS HEIDELBACH, MRS. HOLDEN, MR. NELSON, MR. 
PHILLIPS, MR. SPRAGUE, MRS. VELIE, MR. WILLIAMSON. 

Faculty members from other departments participate in teach- 
ing the education courses. 

The teacher education program is designed to help the student 
mature in the varied understandings and competencies needed by 
the beginning teacher. Building upon the foundation of a sound 
general education, the student is guided toward an understanding 
of the child, the school, and the educative process. Courses in 
theory are carefully interwoven with laboratory experiences in the 
public schools to provide continuing practical experiences through- 
out the student's college career. All aspects of the program have 
as their central aim the development of teachers who are well- 
rounded individuals, who work well with children, and who are 
ready and able to take intelligent action on current educational 
issues. 

REQUIRED COURSES— ALL PROGRAMS 

105 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

The role and scope of public education in American Democ- 
racy; the function of the teacher as a professional person; the na- 
ture of educational programs at the Kindergarten-Primary, Elemen- 
tary, and Secondary levels. Opportunities are provided for the stu- 
dent to pursue activities designed to help him make his choice of 
specialization. 

390 STUDENT TEACHING 

{Credit 10 hours.) 

Course description in Division listings, pages (66), (69), and 
(71). 

410 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Sociological, philosophical, and historical foundations of wes- 
tern education. Students are helped to develop perspective in these 
areas as they relate to current educational issues and practices. 

Prerequisite: 390 Student Teaching. 

410a SAME AS 410. {Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). Required 
of Kindergarten-Primary and Elementary Education students now 



64 



in their last two years who have not had 105 Introduction to Teach- 
ing here or a similar course elsewhere. 

REQUIRED COURSES IN KINDERGARTEN AND 
PRIMARY EDUCATION 

The Kindergarten-Primary Program is built on the premise 
that special knowledge, special capabilities, and special understand- 
ing are required to teach kindergarten and /or grades one, two, and 
three. The following series of interrelated experiences in college 
classes and in nearby public schools deals with problems of the 
teaching-learning process of the elementary school child with em- 
phasis on kindergarten through grade three. Professional Block I, 
II, and III are interdiscipHnary and are taught by a faculty team 
with the coordination and leadership of a kindergarten-primary 
grade specialist. 

MAJOR IN KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular Kindergarten-Primary Program, a 
major in Kindergarten-Primary Education is available to students 
who meet the requirements. Application to work for a major in 
Kindergarten-Primary Education may be made as early as the sec- 
ond semester of the freshman year. Official processing and final 
approval of the application will be made by the Director of the 
Kindergarten-Primary Division during the semester following stu- 
dent teaching. 

To be eligible for a major in Kindergarten-Primary Education, 
a student must have an above-average academic and professional 
record, and must have demonstrated outstanding personal qualifi- 
cations for working with children in kindergarten and /or grades 
one, two, three. In addition to the regular requirements for all 
students in the Kindergarten-Primary Program, people who are 
majoring in this area will pursue, Avith approval of the Director, 5 
additional elective hours with grades of "A" or "B". 

333 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK I 

6 class hours, 2 laboratoiy hours per week. (Credit 6 hours.) 

Parallels Human Growth and Learning (Psychology 203) to 
strengthen the scientific evaluation of children's maturity and capa- 
bilities as manifested through self-expression. Team teaching by 
specialists in art, music, science, physical education, and story tell- 
ing unified by a specialist in early childhood education. Direct ex- 
periences with children serve as another index for curriculum build- 
ing and teaching these areas of emphasis. (Guided observation 
weekly.*) 

* Direct experience with children begins with the Orientation 
Program and runs throughout the professional program. 



65 



334 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK II 

1^ class hours, 1 day laboratory per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Broader and deeper concepts of curriculum planning with 
special emphasis on the objectives and methods in teaching social 
living and language arts, stressing competencies in teaching reading; 
interrelating theory with observation and work with children; 
analysis of classroom management and organization. Team teach- 
ing by specialists in reading, science, and curriculum building. 

335 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK III 

5 hours one day each week for one semester paralleling Student 

Teaching. (Credit 5 hours as indicated below.) 

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED CONCEPTS OF TEACHING 
KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY GRADES. 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours — Part of Professional 
Block III.) 

Implications of research for curricula; advanced concepts 
of reading instruction including diagnostic testing and evalua- 
tion; problems of the teacher's responsibilities other than direct 
teaching of children. Specialists in Professional Block II as- 
sisting block coordinator. 

THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN KINDERGARTEN 
AND THE PRIMARY GRADES. 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour — Part of Professional 

Block III.) 

Culmination of science emphases in Professional Block I 
and Professional Block II stressing classroom procedures for 
instruction. 

THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN KINDERGAR- 
TEN AND THE PRIMARY GRADES. 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours — Part of Professional 

Block III.) 

Reading, discussions, and observations to discover stages 
in the development of children's ability to perform quantita- 
tive thinking; modern methods of presentation from meaning- 
ful experiences. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204 and 205. 

390 STUDENT TEACHING IN KINDERGARTEN AND THE 
PRIMARY GRADES 

4 days per week. (Credit 10 hours.) 



66 



In public school classrooms students engage in all activities 
for which regularly employed teachers are responsible. One full 
semester on two grade levels; both experiences include four full 
days of teaching each week. Students return to the College one day 
each week for Professional Block III. 

REQUIRED COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The Elementary Education Curriculum is designed for stu- 
dents who are interested in the total elementary school program. 
The following required courses are designed to integrate classroom 
and laboratory experience in such ways as to prepare students for 
beginning teaching in public schools. 

MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular Elementary Program, a major in 
Elementary Education is available to students who meet the require- 
ments. Application to work for a major in Elementary Education 
may be made at any time, as early as the second semester of the 
freshman year. Official action on the application will be taken by 
the Director of the Elementary Education Division following stu- 
dent teaching. 

To be eligible for a major in Elementary Education, a student 
must be in good standing, have a cumulative average of 2.00 or 
better with no grade below "B" in professional education courses, 
and must have demonstrated outstanding personal qualifications 
for working with children in the elementary school. In addition 
to the regular requirements for all students in the Elementai7 Edu- 
cation Program, students desiring the major must complete 20.402 
Measurement and Evaluation, and 5.425 The Teaching of Reading 
and Other Language Arts— Advanced Course with grades of "B" or 
better. 

*360 OVERVIEW OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

1 class hour, 1 day of observation and participation per week. 
{Credit 2 hours.) 

The role of the elementary school and the professional role of 
the teacher. Curriculum development as affected by the needs of 
society, child development, and principles of teaching and learning. 

*362 THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES 
IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

8 hours per week for six weeks. (Credit 3 hours — Formerly 361, 
362.) 

The significance of science and social studies for the elementary 
school child and their contributions toward his development. Locat- 

* Admission to these courses for the full-time college student is by 
permission of the Director of the Elementary Division only. 



67 



ing, organizing, synthesizing and interpreting fundamental scien- 
tific and social information. In addition to class work, students 
spend one full day in laboratory experiences as part of this course. 
(Listed in the summer session bulletin as Education 324, Science in 
the Elementary School for 3 credits; and Education 325 Social 
Studies in the Elementary School for 3 credits.) (See also page (101) 
for Elementary School Science program.) 

*363 THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC IN THE ELEMEN- 
TARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The kinds of arithmetic; the nature and meaning of arithmetic; 
core mathematical ideas running through elementary' mathematics; 
research findings in teaching arithmetic; organization of units of 
instruction; evaluation of pupil progress. (Listed in the summer 
session bulletin as Education 323.) 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204 and 205. 

*364 THE TEACHING OF READING AND OTHER AREAS 
OF THE LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

8 hours per week for six weeks. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of language needs and abilities of children. Ways of 
developing children's abilities to use language more effectively in 
reading, writing, speaking, and listening are evaluated. Emphasis 
is upon reading instruction. In addition to class work, students 
spend one full day in laboratory experiences in this course. (Listed 
in the summer session bulletin as Education 321.) 

*371 ART AND THE CHILDi 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The major considerations of art education appropriate to the 
work of the elementary teacher. Experiences in planning and teach- 
ing art. Work in classroom and workshop. Discussion and demon- 
stration. 

*372 MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION^ 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Acquaints students with music programs in the elementary 
school through lecture, class discussion, and practice with children. 

Prerequisite: Music 203. 

* Admission to these courses for the full-time college student is by 

permission of the Director of the Elementary Division only. 
1 Students in Elementary Education will be assigned to two of the 
three methods courses in art, music, or physical education after an 
analysis of their individual needs. The third course may be taken 
as an elective. 



68 



*373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLi 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.)— (Formerly 373, 374.) 

Observation and participation at Lida Lee Tall School. Time 
is devoted to planning and preparation and to presentation. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 202-203; or 112, 
113, 212, 213. 

*390 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

5 days per week for 11 weeks. (Credit 10 hours.) 

Students are assigned to public school classrooms where, under 
the guidance of master teachers, they gradually assume the respon- 
sibilities inherent in the role of the elementary school teacher. Ten 
to twelve weeks are spent in full-time student teaching. A weekly 
conference with the College Supervisor is scheduled after school 
hours. 

COURSES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The program of education for junior and senior high school 
teachers is designed to bring about a close integration between 
teaching methods and the practical experiences of observation and 
student teaching. After introductory courses on the nature of 
today's schools and their students, the secondary teacher in training 
enters into the student teaching semester. Methods, philosophy, 
techniques, and practice are here combined to provide a thorough 
preparation for teaching. The student teaching semester is fol- 
lowed by a course in the foundations of education. 

381 PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The purpose of education, past and present ideas in curriculum 
development and organization, nature of junior and senior high 
school programs and appropriate educational experiences, basic 
teaching techniques, and principles of teaching and learning. 

381a SAME AS 381. 3 hours per week. (Credit 4 hours.) See 
page (57). 

382 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per loeek for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The oral and written communication of ideas in the junior 
and senior high school. Reading, composition, penmanship, spell- 
ing, library usage, and word-study skills. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

* Admission to these courses for the full-time college student is by 
permission of the Director of the Elementary Division only. 



69 



383 THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL 

4: hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The selection of appropriate content, method, and evaluation 
techniques, and the analysis of textbooks and resource materials. 
Demonstration teaching methods are developed and practiced. 

(See also page (101) for High School Science program.) 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

384 THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Current curriculum trends. Materials, methods, and activities 
and their organization for eflFective classroom use. Special methods 
applicable to the teaching of social studies, history, geography, and 
citizenship. Study of the role of social studies in the various types 
of core programs. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

385 MEASUREMENT IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second semester. 

Problems in measurement; principles underlying choice of 
test instruments; survey of test literature; administering, scoring, 
and recording test data; interpretation of test norms; construction 
of informal tests. 

386 THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The teaching in the junior and senior high school of written 
and spoken expression in the light of experimental findings and 
modern practice. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

387 THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The aims and purposes of mathematics instruction. An exam- 
ination of courses of study and textbooks in mathematics for the 
junior and senior high school, presenting some of the scientific 
techniques of instruction in mathematics. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 



70 



388 GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL-SECONDARY 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Group readings and discussions of the scope and function of a 
guidance program; the role of the guidance specialist; the function 
and purpose of the counseling interview; the kinds and uses of 
guidance forms, reports, and records; vocational, educational, and 
personal guidance. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

389 THE TEACHING OF SPEECH AND DRAMA IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

A: hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) Second semester. 

A study of the objectives of speech education in junior and 
senior high school; the problems, materials, methods, and tech- 
niques in specific speech instruction areas; and the integration of 
speech and drama in co-curricular school activities. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

390 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

One day per week for one-half semester; full time for one-half 
semester. {Credit 10 hours.) 

Teaching in public schools provided as an integral part of the 
program of professional education. During the student teaching 
block, methods are made more meaningful by weekly participation 
in an actual classroom situation. Following methods, the student 
engages in full-time practice teaching for approximately one-half 
semester. 

391 AUDIO-VISUAL LABORATORY 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Practical experience in operation of audio-visual apparatus, in 
preparation of teaching aids, and in the application of modern 
tools of learning in the classroom. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

392 MUSIC IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

6 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Study of current methods and materials used by the music 
specialist in the secondary school music program. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

395 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) 



71 



Methods of teaching sports, track and field stunts, combatives, 
rhythms, relays, and mass games. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block and 
Physical Education majors. 

396 THE TEACHING OF ART-SECONDARY SCHOOL 

6 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) Second semester. 

A study of the philosophy underlying art education at all 
levels, of the function of the art specialist, and materials and skills. 
Concurrent course with 376 The Teaching of Art— Elementary 
School; differentiated work according to the teaching level pre- 
ferred. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 

Prerequisite: Art 103 and permission of the instructor. 

402 JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in junior and 
senior high school books apart from school textbooks, aid the stu- 
dent to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and 
increase awareness of degrees of excellence in content and form. 

451 THE CORE PROGRAM IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Designed to help prospective core teachers develop understand- 
ings of the philosophy, organization, content, and methods of core, 
and to build skills necessary for working in a core program. 

Open only to students in the student teaching block. 
451a SAME AS 451. (Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). 

ADDITIONAL COURSES IN EDUCATION 

315 AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 
INSTRUCTION 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Methods of vitalizing learning through the use of pictures, 
school trips, motion pictures, radio, television, records, and trans- 
criptions. The location of materials, operation of apparatus, prep- 
aration of pupil- and teacher-made tools of learning and presenta- 
tion of concrete materials. 

331 HISTORY OF EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Study of major developments, personalities, and movements in 
the evolution of education. Assists the student in organization, 



72 



interpretation, and evaluation of his professional experiences and 
responsibilities. 

376 THE TEACHING OF ART-ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

6 hours per week for eight weeks-. (Credit 2 hours.) Second semester. 

Concurrent course with 396 The Teaching of Art— Secondary 
School. For course description see page (62). 

401 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Examination of children's books apart from school textbooks 
to provide a better working knowledge of this literature, and to 
increase awareness to degrees of excellence in content and form. 

403 DIFFERENTIATED STUDENT TEACHING 
EXPERIENCES 

Time schedule and credit (4-8 hours) adjusted to individual needs. 

Provision for student teaching experiences in addition to those 
in Education 390 or for student teaching in special subject areas 
according to needs and interests of the student. 

Prerequisite: Student teaching and permission of the Director 
of the student's Division (Secondary, Elementary, or Kindergarten- 
Primary). 

405 FIELD STUDIES ON THE CHILD AND HIS 
COMMUNITY 

2 hours per lueek. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The structure and functions of social agencies and their rela- 
tionships to school practices and theories of child socialization. 
Planning and working with groups of children in approved social 
agencies or making intensive studies of recreational and non-recrea- 
tional social agencies, depending on the student's background. Class 
■discussions and field trips. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The aims of the physical education program, appropriate out- 
comes for different age levels, and the selection and use of materials 
which contribute to the accomplishment of the objectives. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 101-102, 201-202; or 112, 113, 
212, 213. 

425 THE TEACHING OF READING AND OTHER LAN- 
GUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-AD- 
VANCED COURSE 



73 



2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second semester. 

Builds upon strengths and needs in the teaching of reading and 
the other language arts revealed during the student teaching experi- 
ence. Emphasis is given to the application of theory and research 
to the teaching of reading and the other language arts. Required 
of Elementary Education majors. 

Prerequisite: Education 390 and permission of Director of 
Elementary Division. 

426 METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF READING 
INSTRUCTION-ADVANCED 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Intended for students who have completed student teaching 
and wish further work in developing and utilizing the pupil's read- 
ing abilities. This course is concerned chiefly with the principles 
involved in building a sound developmental reading program that 
seeks through prevention to minimize reading difficulties. Some 
attention is given to methods of remedial reading. May not be 
taken by those who elect 425. 

430 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL- 
ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Study of materials and procedures in a school music program 
through class discussion, creative activities, and practice with chil- 
dren. Participation in planning and carrying out of musical pro- 
grams in the Lida Lee Tall School. 

435 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of major art education problems at all levels. Materials 
and skills in relation to classroom needs. Participation with chil- 
dren in the developing, planning, and carrying through of projects. 

Prerequisite: 371 Art and the Child. 

450 GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL-ELEMENTARY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The scope and function of an elementary guidance program; 
the role of the teacher in child study; the uses of varied techniques 
in the understanding of children; application of individual and 
group assistance in the promotion of positive relationships; em- 
phasis on the learner. 

450a SAME AS 450. {Credit ^ hours.) Seepage (57), 

174 



505 EDUCATIONAL IDEAS IN HISTORICAL 
PERSPECTIVE 

For description, see page (134). 

506 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

For description, see page (135). 

508 SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Modern courses of study, new textbooks, and recent research 
devoted to arithmetic instruction in the elementary school. Analysis 
of new topics and new techniques. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 204 or consent of the instructor. 

509 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 

3 hours per loeek. [Credit 3 hours.) 

Special consideration of the development and evaluation of sci- 
ence programs; identifying newer trends in elementary science edu- 
cation. A seminar paper, a series of specially designed experiences, 
or a research project is required of each student. 

Prerequisite: The Towson undergraduate requirements in sci- 
ence or written consent of the instructor. 

510 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL 
STUDIES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A seminar in the consideration of the trends, content, issues, 
and materials involved in the teaching of social studies in the 
modern elementary school. Each student will be expected to ex- 
plore in depth one aspect of the subject and present his findings to 
the group. 

526 SELECTED ASPECTS OF METHODS AND MATERIALS 
IN THE TEACHING OF READING IN THE ELEMEN- 
TARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Devised for teachers-in-service and other professional school 
personnel who have not had professional courses in reading such 
as Education 347 or 426. Covers trends in methods, materials, and 
individualized reading designs essential to the organization and 
administration of a functional reading program. Attention is given 
to basic principles of developmental and remedial procedures. 

Prerequisite: Language Arts and/or permission of instructor. 

590 MASTER OF EDUCATION THESIS 

For description, see page (135). 

75 



SPECIAL SUMMER SESSION COURSES 

(Not to be substituted for required courses; elective credit only.) 

221 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHING OF READ- 
ING AND THE OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Credit S hours. 

Effective teaching procedures in the various facets of the ele- 
mentary school language arts program. 

223 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHING OF ARITH- 
METIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Credit 3 hours. 

Practical approaches to the teaching of meaningful arithmetic. 

224 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHING OF SCI- 
ENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Credit 3 hours. 

The significance and scope of science; classroom activities for 
the teaching of science in all elementary grades. 

225 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL 
STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Credit 3 hours. 

Desirable approaches to teaching social studies on the elemen- 
tary school level. 

226 AN INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Credit 3 hours. 

Attention to recent materials and procedures for making music 
an integral part of the elementary school curriculum. 

291-293 INTEGRATED PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

Credit 6 hours. 

An overview of the elementary school curriculum, with em- 
phasis upon the language arts, social living, and related activities 
in other areas. Acquaints students with classroom routines and pro- 
cedures. Daily observation of experienced teachers working and 
planning with groups of children at different grade levels. Special- 
ists discuss and demonstrate activities, materials, and procedures 
in music, art, and physical education. 

Open only to undergraduates. This course is expected to pre- 
cede specific methods courses such as those listed above. 



76 



301-304 INTEGRATED PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

Credit 8 hours. 

Same course as 291-293; first course in education for liberal arts 
graduates. May be followed by required methods or "block" courses 
at the 300 level, provided the prescribed content courses in several 
departments have been completed. 



77 



ENGLISH (6) 

MR. BEVINS (Chairman), MISS CRABTREE, MRS. ELLIOTT, 

MR. GUESS, MR. HANSON, MRS. HEDGES, MISS HENRY, 

MISS HUGHES, MR. LEWIS, MRS. SARGENT, MRS. SAWYER, 

MISS THEARLE, MR. WANTY, MR. WRIGHT. 

Twelve semester hours of credit in English are required of 
all students. The required courses are: 102-103 Composition and 
Introduction to Literature and 204-205 English Literature. In ad- 
dition, 40.100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking is required of all 
students. 

The completion of one 200-level course in the department is 
prerequisite to all 300-level courses in literature. 

ENGLISH-MAJOR AND MINOR 

To satisfy the requirements for the major a student must com- 
plete 34 semester hours of work in the departmental offerings in 
language, composition, and literature. This number includes the 
basic courses prescribed for all college students. The 34 hours will 
include 102-103 Composition and Introduction to Literature; 204- 
205 English Literature; 307-308 American literature, and 16 hours 
elected from the other courses offered by the department. At least 
10 of these elective hours should be at the 300 or 400 level. 

To satisfy the requirements for a minor in English a student 
must complete 22 semester hours of work in the departmental 
offerings in language, composition, and literature. This number 
includes 102-103 and 204-205, plus 10 hours in elective courses, of 
which at least 6 must be on the 300 or 400 level. 

090 REMEDIAL ENGLISH 

(No credit.) 

For students seriously deficient in such areas as spelling, punc- 
tuation, and grammar. Offered as staff time is available and as 
demand warrants. 

* 102-103 COMPOSITION AND INTRODUCTION TO 

LITERATURE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

A review of grammar, the writing of compositions, and reading 
of various forms of literature. A research paper required in the 
second semester. 

English 102-103 is prerequisite to all other courses in composi- 
tion and literature in the department. 

* If a student has a superior record on his entrance examination 
and if he is recommended by the English Department as a can- 
didate for exemption from English 102 or 103, he may request 
an examination prior to registration to exempt him from that 
course. 



78 



204-205 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours each semester.) 

First semester, Chaucer through Blake. Second semester, Words- 
worth through T. S. Eliot. Required of all students. 

224 ELEMENTS OF FICTION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

The techniques of fiction, with emphasis on the short story. 

225 AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

A critical reading from the literary point of view of important 
American biographies and autobiographies. 

231 ADVANCED EXPOSITION 

2. hours per week. (Credit 2, hours.) 

Practice in such types of expository writing as definition, 
process, analysis, the documentary, criticism and review, and re- 
search. 

233 ELEMENTS OF POETRY 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Versification (meter, rhyme, rhythm, diction and figurative lan- 
guage) and the forms and purposes of poetry. 

307 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the major writers in American literature from the 
Colonial Period to Walt Whitman. 

308 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the major writers in American literature from Walt 
Whitman to the present. 

312, 313 HISTORY OF THE DRAMATIC FORM 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours each semester.) 1962-63. 

A study of the dramatic form and the cultural forces which 
influenced it from the ancient Greek period to the present. First 
semester: From the Greek to the Neo-Classic. Second semester: 
From the Neo-Classic to the present. Either semester may be taken 
independently. 



79 



315 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Shakespeare's development as a poet and a dramatist during 
the period of the comedies and historical plays. 

316 SHAKESPEARE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A detailed study of the great tragedies and the late romantic 
comedies. 

319 CONTEMPORARY POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

A study of the work of important twentieth century poets. 

320 CONTEMPORARY NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A study of the work of important twentieth century novelists. 

321 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

The critical reading of plays of the late nineteenth century and 
the twentieth century. 

323 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN NOVEL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The history and development of the American novel from the 
beginning to 1900. 

324 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

The history and development of English drama from the 
Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. 

326 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Greek and Roman mythology. Some attention to the use of 
mythology in English and American literature. 

328 HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD 
TESTAMENT 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The chief books of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha 
studied from a literary and historical point of view. 



80 



332 ADVANCED GRAMMAR 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

English grammar, usage and sentence structure on an advanced 

level. 

333 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

European writings in translation from the time of Homer to 
the Renaissance. 

334 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

European writings in translation from the Renaissance to 1900. 

335 LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

A survey of the period emphasizing the works of major writers, 
social and political background, important literary ideas, and 
criticism. 

337 LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH VICTORIAN PERIOD 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64 

A survey of the period emphasizing the works of major writers, 
social and political background, important literary ideas, and 
criticism. 

383 IMAGINATIVE WRITING 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The art of imaginative expression. The writing of articles and 
short stories and the other creative forms. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

384 NEWSWRITING 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Introduction to the mass media and instruction in the rudi- 
ments of reporting. 

Prerequisite: 102-103 only. 

385 FEATURE WRITING 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The preparation of long and short articles, editorials and news 
features. 



81 



405 LITERARY CRITICISM 

3 hours per week. {Credit S hours.) First Semester. 

The history and principles of literary criticism. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The history and development of the English novel from the 
beginnings to 1900. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of literature beyond the freshman 
year. 

430 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The changes and reasons for the changes in grammar, sound, 
and vocabulary of the language, from Old English to modern times. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of literature beyond the freshman 
year. 

440, 441 SEMINAR IN ENGLISH STUDIES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours each semester.) 

Thorough study of one major area of English or American 
literature (author, period, movement, etc.) not available through 
other electives. Area covered will vary from semester to semester. 
Emphasis on research and scholarly writing, with extensive research 
paper required. Lectures by the instructor and oral reports by stu- 
dents. Available for graduate credit. Open only to seniors and, by 
permission of the instructor, juniors having an exceptionally strong 
background in English. May be taken one or two semesters. 

First semester 1962-63: Edmund Spenser. 

Second semester 1962-63: John Milton. 

Prerequisite: English 102, 103; 204, 205 and at least 6 semes- 
ter hours in electives above the 200 level. Permission of instructor. 



THE TEACHING OF READING AND OTHER AREAS OF 
THE LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

8 hours per week for six weeks. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 364. Course description on page (68). 

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) 



82 



Credited as Education 382. Course description on page (69). 

THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 386. Course description on page (70). 

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 40 L Course description on page (73). 

JUVENILE LITERATURE 

3 hour's per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 402. Course description on page (72). 

THE TEACHING OF READING AND OTHER LANGUAGE 
ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-ADVANCED 
COURSE 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) (Required of Elementary 
Education majors.) 
Credited as Education 425. Course description on page (73). 

METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF READING INSTRUCTION 
-ADVANCED 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 426. Course description on page (74). 

SELECTED ASPECTS OF METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 
THE TEACHING OF READING IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

3 hours per xveek. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 526. Course description on page (75). 



83 



HEALTH EDUCATION (8) 

MISS BIZE (Chairman), MISS HARTMAN, MR. REITENBACH. 

The health education courses deal with the basic needs of the 
human organism for healthy growth and development, and stress 
the responsibility of the individual for maintaining his own health 
and contributing to that of others. 

*115 FIRST AID 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Designed for people who may be called upon to give first aid 
care in the course of their daily activities. Course content of the 
American Red Cross Standard and Advanced First Aid courses is 
included. Red Cross Advanced First Aid certificates awarded. 

*205 CURRENT HEALTH PROBLEMS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours. Formerly 105, 305.) 

A study of selected individual and community health problems. 
Required of all students. 

310 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN PUBLIC HEALTH 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Principles and practices in the field of public health, and the 
organization and administration of various agencies. Major public 
health problems. 

*360 FIRST AID INSTRUCTORS 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

American Red Cross First Aid course for instructors' certifica- 
tion. 

*405 SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Materials for the teaching of health, the place of health in the 
school program, and coordination of the work of teachers and 
school health services. Techniques for encouraging desirable health 
habits and for observing the health of the child in the classroom. 

Prerequisite: 205. Open only to juniors and seniors. 



Required for the major in Physical Education. 



84 



MATHEMATICS (11) 

MISS ARCHER, MR. BECKEY, MISS KOLB, MR. LAUBACH, 
MRS. PERKINS, MR. VOLPEL (Chairman), MISS ZIPP. 

The mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for stu- 
dents to deepen and strengthen their understanding of the basic 
concepts of mathematics, to study the application of mathematics 
to everyday living, to survey the role of mathematics in the develop- 
ment of civilization, and to profit from the discipline it develops. 

204 Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic is required of all stu- 
dents, regardless of their area of specialization. 205 General College 
Mathematics is required of all students enrolled in the Kindergar- 
ten-Primary and Elementary Education divisions. 

A major in mathematics consists of 33 credit hours of work, 
including 204 Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic, 111 College 
Algebra, 112 Trigonometry, 113 Analytic Geometry, and 223-224 
Differential and Integral Calculus. Enough credits to total 33 must 
be earned from the following: 106, 202, 331, 333, 335, 401, 431, and 
433. Students majoring in mathematics must complete a year's work 
of college physics. 

A minor in mathematics consists of a total of 18 credit hours, 
including Mathematics 204. Those wishing to meet the certification 
requirements to teach secondary school mathematics should check 
with the chairman of the department regarding courses. 

Recommended sequence of courses from which selections may 
be made: 

Year First Semester Second Semester 

Freshman Ill, 112 113 

Sophomore 204, 223 106, 224 

Junior 202, 331 333, 401 

Senior 431 335, 433 

106 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Compound interest and discount, amortization, sinking funds, 
annuities, and elements of insurance. 

110 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Treatment of the function concept, equations of high order, 
graphs of equalities and inequalities, exponents and radicals, and 
problem-solving situations. (Will not count toward a major in 
mathematics.) 

Prerequisites: Two semesters of high school algebra. 

85 



111 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A review and extension of basic algebraic principles, concepts, 
and skills. Includes theory of equations, variation, progressions, 
complex numbers, probability, and determinants. 

Prerequisites: 1 10 or two years of high school algebra. 

112 TRIGONOMETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) 

A study of trigonometric functions, identities, equations, in- 
verse functions, logarithms, radian measure, and the solution of 
triangles. 

Prerequisite: Plane geometry and 111. 

(Ill may be taken concurrently with 112.) 

113 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The geometry of the straight line, circle, conies, and certain 
higher plane curves, transformation of axes, polar coordinates, para- 
metric equations, polar equations, and a few topics from solid ana- 
lytic geometry. 

Prerequisites: Plane geometry. 111, and 112. 

(112 may be taken concurrently with 113.) 

202 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

This course is designed to aid the student in his appreciation 
of the more technical aspects of education and psychological re- 
search and will include the following: measures of central tendency, 
correlation, probability, sampling theory, tests of significance, and 
analysis of variance. 

204 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ARITHMETIC 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A mature treatment of the basic concepts of arithmetic. Origins 
of numbers, structure of a positional number system, principles 
underlying the fundamental operations, and computations with 
approximate numbers. Required of all students. 

205 GENERAL COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Elements of algebra, basic geometry, graphs, applications of 
per cent, proportion and variation, right triangle relationships, 
logarithms, elementary statistics, and new topics in mathematics. 
Will not count toward a major in mathematics. 

Prerequisite: 204. 

86 



210 BASIC STATISTICS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Analysis and interpretation of data, measures of central tend- 
enq^, variability, rank and correlations. 

Will not count toward a major in mathematics. 

223-224 CALCULUS, DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours each semester.) 

Functions and limits, differentiation of algebraic functions, 
differentiation of transcendental functions, indefinite and definite 
integrals, integration, Taylor's formula, and applications. 

Prerequisites: 111, 112, 113. 

331 COLLEGE GEOMETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Alternate years. 

A study of modern geometry of the triangle and the circle by 
the synthetic method. Emphasis is placed on the postulational ap- 
proach. Includes introduction to topology. 

Prerequisites: Plane geometry, 223, and 224. 

333 THEORY OF EQUATIONS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Alternate years. 

The major topics studied are complex numbers, properties of 
polynomials, cubic and quartic equations, algebraic criteria for 
ruler-and-compass constructions, determinants, and solution of sys- 
tems of linear equations. 

Prerequisites: 223 and 224. 

335 INTERMEDIATE CALCULUS 

S hours per week. {Credit % hours.) Alternate years. 

This course constitutes a further study of limits, continuity, 
ordinary and partial derivatives, improper integrals, and infinite 
series beyond that of the first year's work. 

Prerequisites: 223 and 224. 

401 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Probability theory in finite sample spaces, random numbers and 
their uses, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, 
confidence limits, hypothesis testings, and central limit theorem. 

Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics, includ- 
ing a second course in algebra and 202. 



87 



431 CONCEPTS OF MODERN MATHEMATICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Sets, groups, rings, fields, inequalities, modular arithmetic and 
related topics. The integration of these topics with secondary school 
mathematics is stressed. 

Prerequisite: 204. 

433 HIGHER ALGEBRA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Study of mathematical systems including properties of those 
systems, fundamental theorems, matrices, congruences, isomorph- 
isms, and postulates. 

Prerequisite: 431. 

THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN KINDERGAR- 
TEN AND THE PRIMARY GRADES 

2 hours per iceek. {Credit 2 hours. Part of Professional Block III.) 

Credited as part of Education 335. Course description on page 
(66). 

THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 363. Course description on page (68). 

THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) First semester. 

Credited as Education 387. Course description on page (70). 

SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 508. Course description on page (75). 



88 



MODERN LANGUAGES (12) 

MISS CAZAUDEBAT, MISS TANSIL, MR. VON 
SCHWERDTNER (Chairman). 

Modern foreign languages are open as electives to all students 
in the college. The completion of the intermediate course, or its 
equivalent, is required of all candidates for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. 

A major in French is being developed by the College, w^ith 
majors in German and Spanish to follow. Programs now in exist- 
ence lead to certification to teach French, German, and Spanish in 
the schools of Maryland. The certification requirements are 24 
credits in each language. Eighteen credits are acceptable if two 
years or more were absolved in high school during the tenth and 
later grades. 

Advanced placement is determined by means of tests which 
should be requested prior to the student's first registration in the 
College. 

GENERAL COURSES 

101-102 FRENCH: ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation 
and elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

201-202 FRENCH: INTERMEDIATE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; trans- 
lation of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate 
with the ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: French 101 and 102 or equivalent. 

111-112 GERMAN: ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

A thorough foundation in grammar; drills in pronunciation 
and elementary conversation; composition and translation. 
211-212 GERMAN: INTERMEDIATE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; trans- 
lation of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate 
with the ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: German 111 and 112 or equivalent. 

131-132 SPANISH: ELEMENTS 

3 hours per week for txco semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 



89 



A thorough foundation of grammar; drills in pronunciation 
and elementary conversation; composition and translation. 

231-232 SPANISH: INTERMEDIATE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

Review of grammar; conversation and prose composition; trans- 
lation of texts of cultural value; outside readings commensurate 
with the ability of the individual student. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 131 and 132 or equivalent. 

ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES 

According to demand, the following courses on the advanced 
level may be given: 

FRENCH 

301-302 HISTORY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 6 hours.) 

A brief history of France; the history of French literature from 
the Chanson de Roland to the present, with collateral readings. 

303 ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Conversation beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 304. 

304 ADVANCED FRENCH COMPOSITION 

1 hour per week. (Credit 1 hour.) 

Composition beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 303. 

305 FRENCH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

An introductory course to the French novel, with emphasis on 
Balzac, Hugo, and at least one twentieth century novelist. 

306 FRENCH SHORT STORY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

An introductory course to the French short story, with empha- 
sis on the realists and some of the more recent authors. 

307 FRENCH DRAMA 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The history of French drama; readings will tend to emphasize 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, since courses emphasizing 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are to be added later. 



90 



308 FRENCH POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of French poetry from the beginnings, with emphasis 
on the nineteenth century, 

GERMAN 

311-312 HISTORY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

A brief history of Germany; the history of German literature 
from the Nibelungenlied to the present, with collateral readings. 

313 ADVANCED GERMAN CONVERSATION 

2 hours pe7' week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Conversation beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 314. 

314 ADVANCED GERMAN COMPOSITION 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Composition beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 313. 

315 GERMAN NOVEL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

An introductory course to the German novel; readings mainly 
from novelists writing from 1870 to 1930; some attention to the 
educational novel. 

316 GERMAN SHORT STORY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The development of the short story in German-speaking lands; 
readings from Keller to the present. 

317 GERMAN DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The history of German drama; readings mainly from plays 
since 1850. Readings in Lessing, Goethe and Schiller are principal- 
ly reserved for courses to be added later. 

318 GERMAN POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of German poetry from Walther von der Vogelweide. 

SPANISH 

331-332 HISTORY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 



91 



A brief history of the Spanish-speaking world; the history of 
Spanish and Spanish-American Hterature, with collateral readings. 

333 ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION 

2 hours per week. [Credit 2 hours.) 

Conversation beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 334. 

334 ADVANCED SPANISH COMPOSITION 

1 hour per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Composition beyond the intermediate level, usually taken in 
conjunction with 333. 

335 SPANISH NOVEL 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of the Spanish novel, dealing mainly with those after 
the middle of the nineteenth century. Cervantes and Galdos are 
subjects of courses to be added later. 

336 SPANISH SHORT STORY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The development of the short story in Spain and Spanish 
America with emphasis on twentieth century authors. 

337 SPANISH DRAMA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The history of the drama in Spain, with collateral readings. 
While some due attention must be given to writers like Tirso, Lope, 
and Calderon, these will be given special attention in courses to 
be added later. 

338 SPANISH POETRY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A survey of Spanish poetry from the beginnings. Readings 
principally of poetry written after 1880, both Spanish and Spanish- 
American, with emphasis on Ruben Dario. 



92 



MUSIC (13) 

MR. ALPER, MR. BOLLINGER, MRS. COULANGE, MR. 
DURO (Chairman), MR. HASLUP, MR. RICE. 

In addition to class work, the Music Department offers private 
lessons in Piano, Voice, and Orchestral Instruments. Students may 
take private lessons to fulfill course requirements in an area of con- 
centration, or as individual elective credit courses. Students not 
concentrating in music may choose non-performing music courses 
as electives. 

The Music Department offers an area of concentration, consist- 
ing of 30 semester hours, which meets state requirements for music 
certification at both the elementary and the secondary level. Stu- 
dents planning on elementary school teaching should take required 
principles and methods work in elementary education. 

For a concentration, sixteen hours must be taken from the fol- 
lowing: 150-450 Private Lessons, 205 Class Voice, 211-212 Concert 
Choir, 214 Class Piano, 215-216 Orchestra, 217-218 Men's Glee Club, 
220 Instrumental String Class, 221 Instrumental Brass Class, 222 
Instrumental Woodwind Class, 223 Instrumental Percussion Class, 
316 Choral and Instrumental Conducting. The remaining 14 hours 
may be selected from the following: 103 Music Appreciation, 203 
Music Fundamentals, 228-229 History of Music, 307 Twentieth 
Century Music, 313 American Music, 317 Sight Singing and Ear 
Training, 318-319 Flarmony, 324 Choral and Instrumental Arrang- 
ing. 

Qualified students may take as many as 14 elective credit hours, 
for the most part in applied music, at the Peabody Conservatory of 
Music. Approval must first be obtained through the chairman of 
the State Teachers College Music Department, and then through 
the dean of the Peabody Conservatory, and a receipt of payment 
for the Peabody course must be presented when registering at State 
Teachers College. 

103 MUSIC APPRECIATION 

2 hours per xveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A study of music literature to acquaint the students with music 
through class discussions and listening. Required of all students, 

150-151, 250-251, 350-351, 450-451 PRIVATE LESSONS 

% hr. lessoji per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Private lessons in piano, voice, orchestral instruments. Fee 
$25.00 per semester. 

203 MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 



93 



Basic music skills and experience in the use of musical instru- 
ments for prospective kindergarten and elementary teachers. 

205 CLASS VOICE 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Class instruction in singing, with emphasis upon basic singing 
techniques and voice production, 

209-210 MIXED CHORUS 

Wz hours per week. {Credit Vz hour.) 

Study and performance of choral literature. Open to all stu- 
dents without audition. 

211-212 CONCERT CHOIR 

3 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Study and performance of advanced choral literature, required 
of all students concentrating in vocal music. Admission by audition 
with the director. 

215-216 ORCHESTRA 

IVz hours per week. {Credit V2 hour.) 

Study and performance of orchestral literature. Open to all stu- 
dents without audition. 

217-218 MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

1% hours per week. {Credit Vz hour.) 

Study and performance of choral literature written and ar- 
ranged for male voices. 

220 INSTRUMENTAL STRING CLASS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Class instruction in string instruments. 

221 INSTRUMENTAL BRASS CLASS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Class instruction in brass instruments. 

222 INSTRUMENTAL WOODWIND CLASS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Class instruction in woodwind instruments. 

223 INSTRUMENTAL PERCUSSION CLASS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Class instruction in percussion instruments. 

228-229 HISTORY OF MUSIC 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



94 



An historical study of the development of music in the western 
world, through discussion, performance and recording. The first 
semester includes music to the end of the eighteenth century; the 
second semester covers music from the late eighteenth century to 
the present. 

230 STRING ENSEMBLE 

3 hours per lueek. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Study and performance of advanced string literature, required 
of all students concentrating in string instruments, with admission 
by audition with the director. 

231 BRASS ENSEMBLE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 1 hour.) 

Study and performance of advanced literature, required of all 
students concentrating in brass instruments, with admission by 
audition with the director. 

232 WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Study and performance of advanced woodwind literature, re- 
quired of all students concentrating in woodwind instruments, with 
admission by audition with the director. 

250-251 PRIVATE LESSONS 
See 150-151. 

307 TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC 

2 hours per lueek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A survey of the music of outstanding composers in the twen- 
tieth century. 

313 AMERICAN MUSIC 

2 hours per iveek. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A study of American music from the Colonial period to the 
present. 

314 CLASS PIANO 

2 hours per week. {Credit 1 hour.) 

Class instruction in piano playing, with five hours per week 
out-of-class preparation required. Open to beginning students and 
students with less than one year's piano instruction, by permission 
of the instructor. 

316 CHORAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Group instruction in basic conducting techniques and inter- 
pretation. 

Prerequisite: 203. 

95 



317 SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Training in reading vocal and instrumental music, with em- 
phasis on recognition and retention of pitch symbols. 

Prerequisite: 203. 

318-319 HARMONY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Study and application of harmonic practices through written 
and keyboard activity. 

Prerequisite: 203. 

324 CHORAL AND INSTRUMENTAL ARRANGING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Study of composition and arranging techniques for voices and 
instruments. 

Prerequisite: 318-319. 

350-351, 450-451 PRIVATE LESSONS 

See 150-151. 

MUSIC IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 372. Course description on page (68). 

MUSIC IN SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

6 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 392. Course description on page (71). 

MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-ADVANCED 
COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 430. Course description on page (74). 



96 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (16) 

MISS BIZE (Chairman), MRS. BLEUL, MISS BROWN, MISS 

DANIELS, MISS GRAESER, MISS HARTMAN, MR. KILLIAN, 

MR. MELVILLE, MR. MINNEGAN, MISS ROACH. 

The physical education program provides for the development 
of skills and understanding for a satisfying participation in sports 
and informal spectatorship, and for the development of interest in 
active outdoor recreation. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJOR 

The Health and Physical Education Department offers a pro- 
gram leading to a major in physical education. The purpose of the 
major is to prepare competent teachers of physical education for 
the public schools of Maryland. A planned sequence of courses 
aims to provide the students with skills and leadership experiences 
needed to direct a balanced program in class, intramural, varsity 
or extra-mural activities, with provision made to prepare for the 
elementary and secondary level. Thirty-six hours are required for 
the major, eight of which must be 212, 213, 312, 313 Professional 
Laboratory Skills; two hours, 110 Overview of Physical Education; 
four hours, 210, 211 Curriculum in Physical Education; three hours, 
330 Kinesiology; two hours, 350 Coaching and Officiating; two 
hours, 340 Physiology of Exercise; two hours, 380 Tests and Meas- 
urements; three hours, 390 Organization and Administration; four 
hours, 400-401 Principles and Problems; two hours, 430 Adaptive 
Physical Education; two hours, 373 Teaching of Physical Education 
in the Elementary School; two hours, 395 Teaching of Physical 
Education in the Secondary School. Health education courses re- 
quired for the major are: 115 First Aid; 205 Current Health Prob- 
lems; 360 First Aid Instructors; 405 School Health Materials. In 
addition to biological and physical science, 17.209-210 Human An- 
atomy and Physiology is required for the major. 

101-102 PHYSICAL EDUCATION-First semester: 101. Second 

Semester: 102. 
2 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An introduction to physical education activities, providing the 
student a foundation for using them intelligently and a systematic 
approach to other and more advanced activities, while helping the 
student to develop and maintain physical fitness and ability in the 
fundamental skills. Required of all students. 

INDIVIDUAL GYMNASTICS 

Work in individual gymnastics for all students. Individual and 
group conferences. The work continues until the student shows 
progress in understanding and demonstration of good posture. This 
is part of the course 101-102. 



97 



110 OVERVIEW OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An overview of the physical education profession, including a 
brief history of physical education, the place of physical education 
in education today, leadership qualities and leaders in the field, pro- 
fessional ethics and standards, professional organizations (their 
piupose and function), and an introduction to professional litera- 
ture. 

112, 113 PE.OFESSIONAL LABORATORY SKILLS 

6 hours per week for two semesters. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Aims to develop knowledge, understanding and personal skill 
in the basic activities appropriate for a teacher of physical educa- 
tion. 

For Physical Education majors. See also 212, 213, 312, 313. 

201, 202 PHYSICAL EDUCATION-F2V5f Semester: 201. Second 

Semester: 202. 
2 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An extension in the second year of 101, 102, which is required 
of all Kindergarten-Primary and Elementary Education students. 
May be elected by others. 

210-211 CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
2 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Aims and objectives in physical education and analysis of out- 
standing programs in the state and nation. Development of pro- 
grams appropriate to various age levels and consideration of pro- 
gression within activities. Organization, administration, and evalua- 
tion of a physical education program. 

212, 213 PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY SKILLS 

See 112, 113. 

220 CAMP LEADERSHIP 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

A study of organized camping: educational objectives, pro- 
gram, responsibihties and qualifications of a camp counselor, facil- 
ities, and standards. 

310 RECREATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Preparation for leadership and organization of after-school 
activities for children, such as club, hiking, camping and play- 
ground activities. Visits to recreation centers. Specialists in story 
telling, crafts, recreational singing, playground, and club work give 



98 



part of the course. Participation in some organized recreation with 

children. 

312, 313 PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY SKILLS 

See 112, 113. 

320 SCHOOL CAMPING AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Aims, organization, administration, and program of the school 

camp. 

325 ADVANCED MODERN DANCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Approaches to composition; dance accompaniment; opportun- 
ities for teaching modern dance. 

Prerequisite: Beginning Modern Dance (included in Profes- 
sional Laboratory Skills). See 112-113 for description. 

330 KINESIOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The mechanical and anatomical analyses of movement in rela- 
tion to human performance. 
Prerequisite: 17.209-210. 

340 PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Study of the physiological changes resulting from physical ac- 
tivity, and their implications for the physical education program. 

Prerequisite: 17.209-210. 

350 COACHING AND OFFICIATING (MEN) 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Basic analysis of fundamentals, tactics, strategy, ethics, and 
other factors in coaching sports, 

373 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Observation and participation at the Lida Lee Tall School. 
Time is devoted to planning and preparation and presentation. 
(Required for students in elementary education. Open to other 
students as an elective.) 

Prerequisite: 101-102, 201-202 or 112, 113, 212, 213. 

380 TEST AND MEASUREMENT IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 



99 



Characteristics of measurement, survey of tests, laboratory ex- 
perience in testing and measuring techniques. 

385 CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

The theoretical and practical methods of preventing and treat- 
ing athletic injuries; techniques of taping and bandaging; emer- 
gency first aid; massage; use of physical therapy modalities. 

390 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Investigation of policies and procedures in the organization 
and administration of physical education. Areas covered include 
facilities, equipment, budget, scheduling, special events, records, 
avy^ards. 

395 THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Methods of teaching sports, track and field stunts, combatives, 
rhythms, relays, and mass games. Also credited as Education 395. 

400-401 PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

2 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 2 hours.) 

An understanding of the scientific foundation of physical edu- 
cation. A general survey of current problems in the fields of physi- 
cal education. 

420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The aims of the physical education program, appropriate out- 
comes for different age levels and the selection and use of materials 
that contribute to the accomplishment of these objectives. Also 
credited as Education 420. 

Prerequisite: 101-102, 201-202 or 112, 113, 212, 213. 

430 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) 

Recognition of pupils with physical deviations, and use of spe- 
cial or modified physical education activities. 



100 



SCIENCE (17) 

MR. BAREHAM, MR. BOWERS, MR. COX, MR. CROOK, MR. 
ERICKSON, MR. HATHAWAY, MRS. LEWIS, MR. MOORE- 
FIELD, MR. MUMA, MISS ODELL, MR. PELHAM (Chairman), 
MR. RUBENDALL, MR. WALKER, MR. YARBROUGH. 

During the academic year 1962-1963, the Science Department 
will offer programs leading to a major in biology and concentra- 
tions in elementary school science and high school science. Course 
requirements for these programs are listed below. Curriculum pat- 
terns may be obtained from the Department Chairman. 

Programs leading to majors in chemistry, and physics, and a 
concentration in physical science are in preparation and their gen- 
eral requirements are listed together with the year that they will, 
most likely, be offered. 

See the section on "General Education Courses," which follows 
the description of the physics major, for Departmental require- 
ments in the general education program. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 

For prospective elementary school teachers who wish a broad 
background in science. Not open to Arts and Sciences students. 
Course requirements are: 103 Fundamentals of Biology, 200, 201, 
300, 400 Physical Science I, II, III, IV, 310 Field Natural Science, 
204 General Botany, 214 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates, 320a 
Astronomy, 324 Geomorphology, for a total of 33 credit hours. Stu- 
dents electing this major are urged to take 11.111 College Algebra. 

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE 

For prospective teachers of secondary school general science.* 

Open to Arts and Sciences students. This concentration will not 
prepare students for graduate work in science. Course requirements 
are: 103 Fundamentals of Biology, 206-207 General Chemistry, 216 
Analytical or 208 Organic Chemistry, 214 Functional Anatomy of 
Vertebrates, 204 General Botany, 211-212 General Physics, 402 
Modern Physics, 401 Advanced Laboratory, 324 Geomorphology, 
320a Astronomy, Science electives (including one field course) for 
eleven credit hours, and 11.111 College Algebra, for a total of 56 
hours in Science and Mathematics. 

BIOLOGY MAJOR 

Open to all students. Prospective secondary school teachers of 
biology should elect this major. Students desiring to do graduate 

* State Certification requirements are that at least 18 hours must 
be taken in biology or chemistry or physics. Electives should be 
chosen so that this stipulation is met. 



101 



work in biology should confer with the Department Chairman be- 
fore the beginning of the junior year. Students having a special 
interest in either animal or plant biology (zoology or botany) 
should, in consultation with a Departmental advisor, take the 
biology electives in the area of interest. Course requirements are: 
103 Fundamentals of Biology, 206-207 General Chemistry, 208 Or- 
ganic Chemistry, 211-212 General Physics,* 204 General Botany, 
214 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates, 205 Field and Systematic 
Botany, 215 Field and Systematic Zoology, 410 Biological Litera- 
ture, Biology electives,** 11.111 College Algebra, for a total of 53 
credit hours in Science and Mathematics. 

NOTE: Premedical and other preprofessional students 
should take 17.120 Zoology I and 17.220 Zoology II, 4 credits 
each, in place of 17.103 Fondamentals of Biology and 17.214 
Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates, respectively. Consult the 
Department Chairman for additional information. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Available 1963. Open to all students. Prospective secondary 
school students electing this concentration can be certified to teach 
both chemistry and physics. They should be aware, however, that 
this concentration will not prepare them to take graduate work in 
either chemistry or physics. The general requirements are: Physics, 
24 hours; Chemistry, 24 hours; Biology, 7 (tentative); Earth Science, 
6 (tentative); Mathematics, 12 hours, for a total of 73 credit hours. 

CHEMISTRY 

Available 1963. Open to all students. Prospective secondary 
school teachers of chemistry should elect this major. Students desir- 
ing to do graduate work in chemistry should confer with the De- 
partment Chairman before the beginning of the junior year. The 
general requirements are: Chemistry, 28 hours; Physics, 8 hours; 
Earth Science, 3 hours; Biology, 7 hours; Mathematics, 12 hours, 
for a total of 58 credit hours. 

PHYSICS 

Available 1963. Open to all students. Prospective secondary 
school teachers of physics should elect this major. Students desir- 
ing to do graduate work in physics should confer with the Depart- 
ment Chairman before beginning the junior year. The general re- 
quirements are: Physics, 28 hours; Chemistry, 8 hours; Earth Sci- 

* If Physics is not taken, 17.200 Physical Science I will be required 
for graduation. 

** Secondary School teachers of biology should include 6 hours of 
Earth Science among their electives; all biology majors must 
select electives so as to have a mimimum of 30 hours of biology. 



102 



ence, 3 hours; Biology, 7 hours; Mathematics, 12 hours, for a total 
of 58 credit hours. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

The general education courses in science help students to un- 
derstand their natural environment and the scientific phenomena 
which are part of their everyday life, and to become aware of the 
nature of the scientific enterprise. 

All students, regardless of the degree they intend to earn, are 
required to complete 12 hours of science as part of their general 
education requirements. Normally, the requirement will be met 
by taking three courses, namely: 103 Fundamentals of Biology, 200 
Physical Science I, and an approved elective. 

Students who are certain that they will not be majors in science 
should normally take 103 Fundamentals of Biology or 200 Physical 
Science I, in the freshman year. The remaining hours may be taken 
at any time. 

Students who think that they will become science majors, and 
those who wish to postpone a decision about the major until the 
sophomore year, should take 103 Fundamentals of Biology and 
either 205 Field and Systematic Botany or 214 Functional Anatomy 
of Vertebrates in the freshman year. Should they decide after these 
courses that they do not wish to become science majors, the comple- 
tion of 200 Physical Science I, will give them 11 or 12 hours toward 
the general education science requirement. Should they decide that 
they wish to become science majors, they will be able to apply the 
hours of biology to the major. 200-201 Physical Science I and II, 
can only be applied to the Elementary School Science concentration. 

103 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY 
6 hours per week. (Credit 4 hours.) 

A basic course in biology prerequisite to all other biology 
courses outlining biological principles common to plants and ani- 
mals. Topics include cell structure and processes (both physical and 
biochemical), mitosis, gametogenesis, some aspects of embryology, 
genetics, and evolution, and an overview of the animal and plant 
kingdoms. 

An average of four laboratory hours per week. 

200 PHYSICAL SCIENCE I 

6 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 4 hours.) 

A first course in general physical science developing principles 
of classical physics and chemistry and the origin of quantum 
physics through a study of selected topics. Applications of prin- 
ciples to astronomy and geology are included. Three lecture hours 
and one three-hour laboratory period. 



103 



201 PHYSICAL SCIENCE II 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) Second semester. 

A second course expanding and giving further applications of 
principles developed in the first course. Three lecture hours and 
one three-hour laboratory period. 

BIOLOGY 

103 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY 

See description under "General Education Courses." This 
course is prerequisite to all other biology courses except for pre- 
professional or transfer students, who may offer 120 Zoology I as a 
substitute. 

120 ZOOLOGY I 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) 

204 GENERAL BOTANY 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) First Semester. 

The basic concepts of plant morphology, anatomy, and physiol- 
ogy explored through the study of selected types. An average of 
four laboratory hours per week. 

205 FIELD AND SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) Second Semester. 

A survey of the plant kingdom centered around taxonomy and 
ecology. Methods of collection, identification, and preservation will 
be developed in the field and laboratory. An average of four labora- 
tory hours per week. 

209-210 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

A study of human anatomy and of the functions of the major 
systems. Included are the muscular, nervous, respiratory, circula- 
tory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. An 
average of three laboratory hours per week. Required of students 
majoring in physical education. 

214 FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A study of the organ systems of selected vertebrate types, em- 
phasis being placed on basic physiological processes involved. Lab- 
oratory studies are based primarily on dissections of the bullfrog 
and the foetal pig. Constant comparisons are made between human 
and other vertebrate animals. Included is a consideration of 
embryological principles, using starfish, frog, chick and human as 
examples. An average of two hours per week in laboratory work. 



104 



215 FIELD AND SYSTEMATIC VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) First Semester. 

A systematic consideration o£ the vertebrate classes. The evolu- 
tion, distribution, and definitive features of each class are studied 
comparatively. Extensive field and laboratory work deals with 
morphologic, taxonomic, ecologic, and behavioral features of 
selected vertebrate groups and species. An average of four hours 
per week in laboratory work. 

218 BIOLOGICAL READINGS 

1 hour per week for o?ie semester. (Credit 1 hour.) 

220 ZOOLOGY II 

6 hours per week for one semester. [Credit 4 hours.) 

303 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

4 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1963-64, 1965-66. 

Study of fresh, brackish, and salt water species of major phyla 
from the Protozoa through the Arthropoda (except the insects) 
with special emphasis on local forms. Economic, ecological, and 
taxonomic considerations. Field trips for collections. An average 
of two laboratory hours per week. 

304 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES 

6 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 4 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1962-63, 1964-65. 

A comparative study of vertebrate animals, their structure, 
natural history, and relationships, by means of dissections, lectures, 
and discussions. An average of three laboratory hours per week. 

Prerequisite: 214 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates or 220 
Zoology II. 

314 ORNITHOLOGY 

4 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Sem- 
ester 1963-64, 1965-66. 

A laboratory and field course in bird identification, structure, 
behavior, ecology, and general economic relationships. Emphasis 
is on birds of the Baltimore area. A banding station is operated 
throughout the course. Occasional field trips. An average of two 
laboratory hours per week. 

315 ENTOMOLOGY 

4 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1962-63, 1964-65. 

A laboratory and field course in the study of insects. Recogni- 
tion of the more common orders, and a study of their structure. 



105 



behavior, ecology, economic importance, and control. An average 
of two laboratory hours per week. 

318 MICROBIOLOGY 

6 hours per week for one semester. [Credit 4 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1963-64, 1965-66. 

Principally a laboratory course investigating such groups of 
organisms as bacteria, protozoa, and lower plant forms, with em- 
phasis on bacteria. An average of four laboratory hours per week. 

Prerequisite: 206-207 Chemistry may be taken concurrently. 

333 HISTOLOGY AND MICROTECHNIQUE 

4 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Se- 
mester 1962-63, 1964-65. 

A study of the principal vertebrate tissues. Laboratory work 
will include both the interpretation and preparation of tissue slides 
for microscopic study. An average of three laboratory hours per 
week. 

Prerequisite: 214 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates or 220 
Zoology II and 206-207 Chemistry. 

340 GENETICS 

3 hours per loeek for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semes- 

ter 1962-63, 1964-65. 

Presentation of the principles of heredity and variation, and 
their application to evolution and development. Gene action at 
the morphological, physiological, and biochemical levels. Three 
one-hour lecture periods. 

Prerequisite: 206-207 Chemistry, which may be taken con- 
currently, or permission of the instructor. 

350 COMPARATIVE PLANT ANATOMY 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1962-63, 1964-65. 

A comparative anatomical survey of the various plant groups 
with emphasis on their evolutionary relationships. An average of 
two laboratory hours per week. 

Prerequisite: 204 General Botany. 

352 ECONOMIC BOTANY 

3 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Se- 
mester 1963-64, 1965-66. 

Family groups of plants of North America studied in terms of 
their value to man. Three one-hour lectures. 

Prerequisite: 205 Field and Systematic Botany. 

106 



410 BIOLOGICAL LITERATURE 

2 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Se- 

mester 1963-64, 1965-66. 

Familiarization with the literature of biology through the prep- 
aration of papers requiring a review of the literature. Two one- 
hour lectures. 

500 SELECTED GENERAL PRINCIPLES IN BIOLOGY 

3 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A course involving the biology staff and its various areas of 
interest. Current directions of biological investigations will be 
discussed together with a treatment of recent contributions to bio- 
logical areas and principles. Sufficient background will be given to 
provide coherence and understanding. Three one-hour lectures. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

CHEMISTRY 

206-207 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

Principles and theories of modern chemistry. Chemical laws, 
physical constants, theories of solutions, ionization, valency, and 
structure of matter. An experimental and problem approach. Three 
one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

208 BRIEF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) Second 

Semester. 

A study of carbon compounds, their nomenclature and reac- 
tions. Relationships of these reactions to everyday life. Three one- 
hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 206 Chemistry or consent of the instructor. 

216 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

7 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) First Semes- 

ter 1963-64, 1965-66. 

A study of volumetric and gravimetric principles of chemical 
analysis with some study of instrumental methods of analysis. One 
one-hour lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. 

Prerequisite: 206-207 Chemistry or consent of instructor. 

PHYSICS 

211-212 GENERAL PHYSICS 

6 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 8 hours.) 

A standard first year course in general college physics. Me- 
chanics, heat, and sound are considered in the first semester; light. 



107 



electricity, magnetism and a brief introduction to modern physics 
in the second. 

Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 11.111 College Algebra or consent of the instruc- 
tor. 

334 HEAT AND THERMODYNAMICS 

6 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 4 hours.) First Semes- 
ter 1962-63, 1964-65. 

Definition and measurement of iso- and adiabatic processes 
and thermodynamic functions such as temperature, specific heat, 
entropy, enthalpy. Heat conversion and transfer, equalibrium and 
cyclic phenomena. Thermal radiation. 

Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 21 1-212 Physics and 1 1.223-224 Calculus. 

402 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS 

3 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) Second 

Semester. 

A lecture and problems course presenting our modern knowl- 
edge of the fundamental particles of matter, thermionics, photo- 
electric effect. X-rays, atomic structure, radioactivity, nuclear reac- 
tions, cosmic rays. Three one-hour lectures. 

Prerequisite: 211-212 Physics. 

EARTH SCIENCE 

320 GENERAL ASTRONOMY 

2 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The science of astronomy; investigations and theories concern- 
ing the solar system, galaxies and the universe. Lectures. 

320a SAME AS 320. 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

324 GEOMORPHOLOGY 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) Second 

Semester. 

Land forms, their origin and the processes whereby they are 
modified. Field work in the local community. Two one-hour lec- 
tures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 30.103-104 Elements of Geography, or consent 
of the instructor. 



108 



INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

300 PHYSICAL SCIENCE III 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semes- 
ter beginning 1963-64. 

Extension and application of principles developed in Physical 
Science I and II. Emphasis in the fields of hydrostatics, machines, 
sound and electronics. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 200-201 Physical Science I and II. 

310 FIELD NATURAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 3 hours.) Second 
Semester. 

A study of various natural environments to determine their 
physical and biological components and to understand the relation- 
ship of these forms to one another and to man. Emphasis is on 
field observation. An average of two laboratory hours per week. 

Prerequisite: 103 Fundamentals of Biology or 120 Zoology I. 

312 INTRODUCTORY AVIATION 

2 hours per week for one semester. {Credit 2 hours.) Second 
Semester 1963-64, 1965-66. 

Principles of flight; airplane control, stability and performance; 
engines; weather; navigation and air traffic control; aircraft and 
pilot regulations. Field and laboratory experiences optional and 
subject to the instructor's approval. Two one-hour lectures. (Stu- 
dents may not have taken 400 Physical Science IV). 

312a SAME AS 312. 3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Field trips, laboratory and link trainer instruction required. 

(Students may not have taken 400 Physical Science IV.) 

392 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit S hours.) Second 
Semester 1962-63, 1964-65. 

The basic conservation practices and problems with emphasis 
on soil, water, forest, and wildlife aspects and their interrelation- 
ships. Specialists in various phases of local, state and federal con- 
servation work conduct or assist in the conduct of numerous field 
trips. An average of three laboratory hours per week. 

Prerequisite: 103 Fundamentals of Biology or 120 Zoology I, 
and 30.103-104 Elements of Geography. 

400 PHYSICAL SCIENCE IV 

4 hours per week for one semester. {Credit S hours.) Second 
Semester beginning 1963-64. 



109 



Extension and application of principles developed in Physical 
Science I and II. 

Emphasis in the fields of heat engines and propulsion units, 
atmospheric study including meterology, aeronautics, avigation 
and space penetration. 

Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite: 200-201 Physical Science I or II. (Students may 
not have taken 312 Introductory Aviation.) 

401 ADVANCED LABORATORY IN PHYSICAL OR 
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

4 hours per week for one semester. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Exacting laboratory work of an advanced nature under the 
guidance of the Science Department staflE. Each student will pre- 
sent and defend his work at a seminar. When registering, the stu- 
dent must indicate whether he will take his work in biology, 
chemistry or physics. 

Prerequisite: The consent of the instructor. 

THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN KINDERGARTEN 
AND THE PRIMARY GRADES 

1 hour per week. (Credit 1 hour. Part of Professional Block III.) 

Credited as part of Education 335. Course description on page 
(66). 

THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
8 hours per week for six weeks. (Credit 3 hours. Formerly 
5.361, 362.) 

Credited as Education 362. Course description on page (67). 

THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 383. Course description on page (70). 

SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 509. Course description on page (75). 



110 



PSYCHOLOGY (20) 

MRS. AMMEN, MR. CASSATT, MR. MOSER (Coordinator), 
MR. NEULANDER, MR. SAXTON, MR. WILSON. 

The psychology programs offered in this college are designed 
to promote growth in the understanding prediction, and control 
of human behavior. 

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

In addition to the required courses, a student may elect a 
minor in psychology. The purpose of a minor in psychology is to 
provide a planned selection of elective courses beyond the psychol- 
ogy requirement. A student may select a pattern of courses to 
satisfy any of the following purposes: 

1. To become a more effective teacher. 

2. To prepare for teaching in the fields of special education. 

3. To prepare for further study at the graduate level in the 
behavioral sciences. 

4. To further his general education in the behavioral sciences 
at the undergraduate level. 

Required courses are 201, 202, and 203. A minor in psychology 
will be completed by the selection of 11 or 12 approved elective 
hours in psychology. 

090 CLINICAL READING 

3 hours per week. {No college credit.) 

Provided for new students whose test scores indicate a special 
need for improved reading skills. 

201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The problems, methods, facts and principles of psychology. 
General principles of psychological development; learning, remem- 
bering and thinking; motivation of behavior; perception; feeling 
and emotion; measurement of individual differences. Required of 
all students. 

202 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Research methodology and simple experimentation illustrating 
the subject matter of general psychology and human growth and 
development and the use of the experimental method. Demonstra- 
tions and experiments in learning, sensory experience, feeling and 
emotion, individual differences, measurement of personality traits. 



HI 



Prerequisite: 201, 203. Psychology 202 may be taken concur- 
rently with 203. 

203 HUMAN GROWTH AND LEARNING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Analysis of physiological and psychological growth patterns 
manifested by individuals. Learning theories, personality adjust- 
ment, and various forces aflEecting learning and personality. Class 
discussions and lectures supplemented by laboratory activities. Re- 
quired of all students in Teacher Education. 

Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. 

206 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Summer Session only. 

The emotional development and motivational processes from 
childhood through adulthood. The impact of cultural and societal 
demands upon the growing child and his methods of meeting these 
demands. 

Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. 

307 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Physical, emotional, intellectual development during adoles- 
cence; social development and heterosexuality; adolescent person- 
ality; problems of adjustment; juvenile delinquency; guidance of 
adolescents. 

Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. 

308 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Learning as adjustment; forms of learning; experimental data 
concerning the fundamental nature and conditions of learning. 
Teaching and learning; procedures helpful for improving learning 
efficiency; transfer of training. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

322 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The structure and function of groups. Recent advances in 
sociology, anthropology and psychiatry— related to psychology. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 



112 



Educational and psychological testing and evaluation. The 
construction, administration, interpretation and use of the various 
evaluative devices of achievement, aptitude, intelligence, interests, 
and personality. 

Prerequisite: 201 and permission of the instructor. Required 
of Elementary Education majors. 

403 MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) First Semester. 

The study of emotions and other motives as they arouse and 
sustain behavior. Historical and contemporary trends. Emphasizes 
human rather than comparative aspects. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

403a SAME AS 403. (Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). 

404 PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A study of individual differences in human traits and char- 
acteristics; methodology, basic principles, and major findings in 
research. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

405 PERSONALITY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Theoretical and practical approaches to the study of person- 
ality. Introduction to psychodynamics. Introduction to methods 
and materials of personality assessment. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

420 MENTAL HYGIENE 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The functions and processes of adjustment related to mental 
health, main problems of life to which adjustment is made, and the 
nature of conflict. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

460 INTRODUCTION TO THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The mental equipment of individual children. Degrees of 
retardation and their causes, disorders of behavior which frequently 
are concomitant, and the psychological bases of a suitable curri- 
culum for mentally retarded children. The causes and consequences 
of emotional problems. Characteristics and needs of the gifted 



113 



child, special problems in development, motivation, and learning, 
and their implications for educational provisions. 

Prerequisite: 201, 203. 

501 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT- 
ADVANCED 

For description, see page (135). 

502 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Secojid Semester. 

An analysis of major schools of psychology with emphasis on 
their theoretical and methodological approaches. Leading figures 
of each school and their contributions to current practices of under- 
standing, directing, and predicting human behavior. 

Prerequisites: 12 credit hours in psychology and consent of 
the instructor. 

502a SAME AS 502. (Credit 5 hours.) Seepage (57). 

503 SEMINAR IN SELECTED PROBLEMS IN 

PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Investigation of selected problems of current significance in 
various fields of psychology. Students with special interests will 
have the opportunity to choose problems with psychological impli- 
cations. 

Prerequisites: 12 credit hours in psychology and consent of 
the instructor. 



114 



SOCIAL SCIENCE (30) 

MR. ANDREWS, MR. BEISHLAG, MRS. BELL, MR. BLUM- 
BERG, MR. COLEMAN, MR. DIFFENDERFER, MR. FALCO, 
MR. FIRMAN, MR. FISHER, MR. HUTSON, MR. JOHNSTON, 
MISS KAHL (Chairman), MRS. KRUPPA, MR. MARTIN, MR. 
MATTHEWS, MR. MATTINGLY, MR. McCLEARY, MR. 

ONION 

Twelve semester hours of credit in social science are required 
of all students. Six hours must be taken in 121-122 History of Wes- 
tern Civilization or 221-222 History of the United States. The stu- 
dent may select the remaining six hours from other Social Science 
Department courses. 

Students may select a major or a minor in geography, history, 
or social sciences. The purpose of the major or minor is to provide 
a planned sequence of courses so that students may develop pro- 
ficiency in the respective fields. A mark of G or higher is required 
for credit to be applied on a major. Majors and minors prescribe 
minimum requirements, but students may elect a maximum of forty 
credits in a field (example: geography or history) and a maximum 
of sixty credits in the department. 

MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

Thirty credit hours are required as a minimum for a major in 
geography, six hours of which must be 103-104 Elements of Geo- 
graphy; three hours 310 Geography of the United States; and three 
hours 316 Economic Geography. At least one systematic course 
must be chosen from the following: 330 Geography Laboratory, 
331 Political Geography, and 413 Urban Geography. The remain- 
ing 15-16 hours must be selected from geography electives in con- 
ference with a departmental adviser. 

MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

Twenty-one hours are required as a minimum for a minor in 
geography, six hours of which must be 103-104 Elements of Geo- 
graphy; three hours 310 Geography of the United States; and three 
hours 316 Economic Geography. At least one systematic course 
must be chosen from the following: 330 Geography Laboratory, 331 
Political Geography, and 413 Urban Geography. The remaining 
6-7 hours must be selected from geography electives in conference 
with a departmental adviser. 

MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Thirty credit hours are required as a minimum for a major in 
history, six hours of which must be 121-122 History of Western 
Civilization and six hours 221-222 History of the United States and 
two hours Proseminar in history. The remaining sixteen hours 



115 



must be chosen from history electives in conference with a depart- 
mental adviser. 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

Eighteen credit hours are required as a minimum for a minor 
in history, six hours of which must be 121-122 History of Western 
Civilization and six hours 221-222 History of the United States, The 
remaining six hours must be selected from history electives in con- 
ference with a departmental adviser. 

MAJOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Fifty-four credit hours are required for a major in the social 
sciences, six hours of which must be 121-122 History of Western 
Civilization and six hours 221-222 History of the United States; 
six hours 103-104 Geography; six hours in Political Science, six 
hours in Sociology or Anthropology; and six hours in Economics. 
The remaining eighteen hours must be selected from upper divi- 
sion courses in conference with a departmental adviser. (Note: To 
meet certification requirements for the State of Maryland, students 
planning to teach social studies in secondary schools must include 
at least six hours of history electives in the eighteen hours to be 
chosen from upper division courses.) 

GEOGRAPHY 

103-104 ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week for two semesters. [Credit 6 hours.) 

Elements of the physical environment and the changes result- 
ing from the operation of both human and natural agencies; re- 
gional studies with emphasis upon interrelations between the 
physical environment and plant, animal and human life; map read- 
ing and interpretation. 

309 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Areal distribution and character of the economic activities in 
various Latin American countries in relation to physical and cul- 
tural features. Resources and problems of their development; im- 
portance of foreign trade to the economy; relationships with the 
United States. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

310 GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The common social, economic and political interests of the 
major regions of the United States. The culture patterns of each 



116 



region in relation to the natural settings in which they have de- 
veloped. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

311 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

A regional analysis and appraisal of the human geography and 
natural resources of Europe. Problems of nationality, economic de- 
velopment, and cultural conflicts. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

314 GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN 
ASIA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Regional studies of the physical and cultural foundations of 
India, Pakistan, Ceylon, Philippines, and Indonesia. Principal hu- 
man and economic resources, problems of development, and role in 
world affairs. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

315 GEOGRAPHY OF EASTERN ASIA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Regional studies of the physical and cultural foundations of 
China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasis upon human and economic 
resources, and role in world affairs. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

316 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The regional distribution of the world's resources, industries, 
and population with emphasis upon problems of international 
trade. An analysis of the productive and extractive industries, 
manufacturing, and commerce in relation to the geographic envir- 
onment. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

318 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

A regional analysis of the natural resources and human geo- 
graphy of Africa. Problems of economic development, nationality 
and cultural conflicts. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

319 GEOGRAPHY OF THE USSR 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 



117 



The regional diversity, natural resources, industrial and agri- 
cultural areas, and other factors bearing on the Soviet Union as a 
world power. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Political, social and economic development of the state and its 
relations to major events in the development of the nation. Natural 
resources; regional land use; industrial development, particularly in 
the Baltimore area. Field trips. Field trip expenses about $15, pay- 
able when trips are taken. 

Prerequisite: 103-104; 221-222. 

330 CARTOGRAPHY 

4 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

Practical exercises in cartography and in graphic presentation 
of statistical material. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

331 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

An analysis of the effect of political groupings upon man's use 
of the world, and of the influence of the geographic base upon 
political power. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

390 GEOGRAPHY OF AUSTRALIA AND OCEANIA 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

A regional approach in analyzing and interpreting the physical 
and cultural patterns, natural resources, current problems, and 
strategic importance of the Pacific World. 

Prerequisite: 103-104, 

395 CLIMATOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

A study of the character, causes, and distribution of climatic 
types. Emphasis upon world patterns. 

401 GROWTH OF GEOGRAPHIC THOUGHT 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

The history, nature, and methodology of geography as a dis- 
cipline. Analysis of schools of geographic thought; critical evalua- 
tion of important geographic works. 



118 



Prerequisite: Acceptance as a major or minor student in the 
Social Science Department. 

413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

A survey of the structure, functions, forms and development of 
urban units. Emphasis upon the locational features of social, eco- 
nomic, and cultural phenomena. Field work. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

425 MAP READING AND INTERPRETATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours). 

A study of the principal types of maps and their uses. Empha- 
sis on understanding map components and the range of physical 
and cultural phenomena indicated on maps. Includes selected ex- 
ercises which illustrate the analytical and graphical values of maps. 

Prerequisite: 103-104. 

430 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

Reading and research in selected problems in the field of geo- 
graphy. 

Prerequisite: At least 12 hours of geography and approval of 
instructor. 

HISTORY 

121-122 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

The political, economic, social, and cultural forces which have 
shaped the pattern of western life from post-Roman Europe to the 
present. (121: Post-Roman Europe to 1648; 122: 1648 to present.) 

221-222 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week for two semesters. {Credit 6 hours.) 

The political, economic, social, and cultural forces which have 
shaped the pattern of life in the United States. Emphasis upon the 
origins and development of American democracy. (221: Colonial 
period to 1865; 222: 1865 to present.) 

260 THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST AND GREECE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The development of early Stone Age Man, the rise and fall of 
the civilizations of the Near East and Greece. 

261 THE ROMAN WORLD 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 



119 



The emergence of republican Rome, her conquest of the Medi- 
terranean World, the emergence and decline of the Empire. 

303 SURVEY OF ENGLISH HISTORY TO 1783 

3 hours per week. [Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

The evolution of the political, legal, social, economic and cul- 
tural institutions of England and the spread of the Empire overseas. 
The triumph of Parliament over the monarchy and the develop- 
ment of the Rights of Englishmen. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

304 BRITISH HISTORY SINCE 1783 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours) Second Semester 1963-64. 

The struggle against France, the Industrial Revolution, the rise 
of the bourgeoisie to political control, the spread of empire, the 
symbolism of the Victorian era, and the evolution of democratic 
process. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

312 EUROPE SINCE 1914 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Events leading to World War I, the course of the conflict, and 
the peace which followed. The rise of conflicting political ideol- 
ogies between wars; the origins, strategies, and results of World 
War II. The material achievements of the modern age. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

320 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Course description on page (1 18). 

321 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1820 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Spanish and Portuguese colonization of the New World; natur- 
al resources, government, economic and social life, and the War of 
Independence. 

322 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1820 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

Origin, political growth, and economic development of the 
Latin American republics, with emphasis upon present-day condi- 
tions, 

333, 334 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours each semester.) 1963-64. 



120 



American economic development from the colonial period to 
the present, with an emphasis upon trends and problems of con- 
temporary importance. (333: Colonial times to 1865; 334: 1865 
to present. Either semester may be elected independently of the 
other.) 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

345 THE AMERICAN COLONIES: 1492-1763 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) Second Semester 1963-64. 

A study of the founding and the political, economic, and social 
development of the American colonies. 

348 SECTIONALISM AND THE CIVIL WAR 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) First Semester 1963-64. 

Conflict between rising industrialism and the Old South; the 
abolition crusade, secession; political, economic, and social signifi- 
cance of the Civil War. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

349 RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW NATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) Second Semester 1963-64. 

Aftermath of the Civil War; reconstruction; economic con- 
sequences of the war; the Grant Era; the New South; the continu- 
ance and decline of sectionalism. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

352 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) First Semester 1963-64. 

American foreign policy from the Revolutionary War to the 
present. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

361 MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) Second Semester 1963-64. 

The principal currents of social and intellectual development 
in medieval Europe. Political and social theory, economic patterns, 
the church and major religious movements. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

362 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours) Second Semester 1962-63. 

The social and intellectual changes in Western Europe between 
1350 and 1650 which mark the transition from medieval to the 



121 



modern world. Special attention to background development and 
impact on Western culture. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

362a SAME AS 362. (Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). 

363 EUROPE 1648-1815 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

The European state system in relation to the expansion o£ 
European civilization, intellectual growth and class relationships 
culminating in the French Revolution and Napoleon. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

364 EUROPE 1815-1914 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

The major economic, political, social, and intellectual currents 
of the period. The effects of the industrial revolution, the develop- 
ment of nationalism and imperialism, the origin of the first world 
war. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

365 HISTORY OF EASTERN ASIA SINCE 1500 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

The social, political, and cultural institutions of the major 
Asian powers from early modern times. The impact of Western 
civilization upon Asia, the orisis of the 20th century and current 
problems of that area. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

370 RUSSIA SINCE 1800 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

Russian development since 1800, stressing the political and eco- 
nomic conditions which form the background for the revolution of 
1917. An analysis of the Soviet Regime, 1917 to the present. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

375 FRANCE: 1763-1871 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

A study of the Old Regime and the impact of successive revolu- 
tions upon French society. Emphasis upon the role of France in 
the growth of European Liberalism and Nationalism. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

385 UNITED STATES-SOVIET RELATIONS 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 



122 



An analysis of diplomatic, cultural, and economic relations be- 
tween the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. Emphasis on the period since 1933 
with a careful study of the effects of the Second World War upon 
the balance of power. 

Prerequisite: 121-122 or 221-222. 

396 MODERN WESTERN COLONIALISM 

2 hours per loeek. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

The expansion of Western culture and institutions with par- 
ticular reference to its effects on the peoples of Asia and Africa in 
the period since 1870. 

Prerequisite: 122. 

396a SAME AS 396. {Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). 

405 CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64, 

The historical forces resulting in the formation of the constitu- 
tion; the development of American constitutionalism in theory and 
practice. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

414 INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hoitrs per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Historical development of American intellectual life from the 
seventeenth century to the present. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

415 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

The everyday life of Americans from the seventeenth century 
to the present. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

416 RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The economic, social and political history of the United States 
since 1900. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

420 PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours). 



123 



Reading and research dealing with a phase of history to be 
selected by the instructor; considerable attention to sources and 
historiography. 

Prerequisite: 121-122, 221-222 and approval o£ instructor. 

420a SAME AS 420. (Credit 3 hours.) See page (57). 

421 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Selected problems in the Revolutionary and Constitutional 
periods. The technique and methodology of historical research and 
writing. 

Prerequisite: 221-222 and approval of instructor. 

502 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN 
CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Offered on demand. 

A reading and research course dealing with a phase of modern 
Western history to be selected by the instructor. Particular atten- 
tion given to techniques of research and writing. 

Prerequisite: 121-122, 221-222 and approval of instructor. 

503 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Offered on demand. 

A study of recent problems faced by states in their relationships 
with each other. Ample opportunity for the student to pursue 
topics of individual interest and to present the results of such in- 
vestigation to the seminar. Political, economic, social, and cultural 
relationships among nations will be considered as worthwhile areas 
of research. 

Prerequisite: 121-122, 221-222 and 307. 

ECONOMICS 

202 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Basic course investigating the problems of production of 
wealth; forces determining price; business organization; distribu- 
tion of wealth; money, credit, and banking; foreign trade; labor; 
agriculture; public finance; comparative economic systems. 

203 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Continuation of 202, which is a prerequisite. 



124 



325 CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1962-63. 

A study of modern economic institutions— their origins, de- 
velopment, and present status. Emphasis upon developments in 
England, Western Europe, and the United States. 

382 LABOR ECONOMICS AND LABOR RELATIONS 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

General survey of labor economics and labor relations. His- 
tory, organization, and operation of American trade unionism; 
collective bargaining; review of labor legislation. 

Prerequisite: 202. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

206 GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

The structure and functions of the government of the United 
States and the problems involved in the extension of the scope of 
democratic government in our contemporary life. 

207 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1963-64. 

A study of historical background; state constitutions; the legis- 
lative, executive and judicial branches of government; problems of 
state administration; federal-state relations; county and municipal 
government. Emphasis upon the government of Maryland. 

Prerequisite: Five or six hours credit in social science. 

307 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

The policies pursued and methods used by states in attempting 
to achieve their objectives in relations with other states. Sover- 
eignty, power politics, balance of power, imperialism. The organi- 
zation and role of the United Nations in international relations. 

Prerequisite: 103-104 and 121-122. 

338, 339 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF FOREIGN 
POWERS 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours each semester.) 

A comparative survey of the constitutional and legal processes 
of England, France, Russia, Italy, Germany, China and Japan. 
Some attention to the smaller social-democratic states of Europe. 
(338: The Western World; 339: Russia and the East. Either se- 
mester may be elected independently of the other.) 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 



125 



35 1 POLITICAL THEORY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Political thought in the West from the Greeks to the present, 
emphasizing the great political thinkers, the intellectual movements 
in political theory, and their role in shaping the ideologies of the 
present world. 

Prerequisite: 121-122. 

355 THE LATIN AMERICAN POLICY OF THE 

UNITED STATES 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) First Semester 1962-63. 

Diplomatic and cultural relations between the United States 
and Latin America. The Pan-American Movement, implementing 
the Monroe Doctrine, and the advent of the Good Neighbor Policy. 

Prerequisite: 221-222. 

355a SAME AS 355. {Credit % hours.) Seepage (57). 

417 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 

2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester 1963-64. 

Origin and development of the American two-party system. 
The activities of pressure groups and organizations, and the ensu- 
ing effects upon the party system. 

SOCIOLOGY 

201 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) 

An analytical survey of the development of human group life. 
Patterns of individual and group behavior, social interaction, the 
rise and diffusion of cultural elements, social organization and in- 
stitutions, and current social changes. 

205 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours) First Semester. 

An examination of basic principles and methods of anthro- 
pological research; comparative analysis of cultural evolution, social 
organization, and personality development in primitive and modern 
cultures. 

344 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 
2 hours per week. {Credit 2 hours). 

The growth and personality development of die individual in 
the family situation. Patterns of physical, social, and mental ad- 
justment in conjugal life. Survey of family life patterns in time 
and space. 



126 



380 SOCIAL PATHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

An analytical survey of pathological behavior in the United 
States today, with emphasis on the area of juvenile delinquency as 
a social problem. A historical review of the nature and extent of 
delinquency, its etiology, and methods of treatment. 

Prerequisite: 201. 



THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES 
IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

8 hours per week for six weeks. (Credit 3 hours. Formerly 5.361, 
362.) 

Credited as Education 362. Course description on page (67). 

THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. (Credit 2 hours.) 

Credited as Education 384. Course description on page (70). 

SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES 
3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Credited as Education 510. Course description on page (75). 



127 



SPEECH AND DRAMA (40) 

MR. BREWINGTON (Coordinator), MRS. BREWINGTON, 

MRS. ELLIOTT, MR. GILLESPIE, MISS HENRY, 

MISS HUGHES. 

All students are required to take 100 Fundamentals of Public 
Speaking unless they are excused by the Speech Division. 

SPEECH AND DRAMA-MAJOR AND MINOR 

To satisfy the requirements for a major in Speech a student 
must complete 36 semester hours of work in the departmental 
offerings in speech and drama. This number includes 100 Funda- 
mentals of Public Speaking; 330 Phonetics of American English; 
370 Play Directing. In addition, he must take 220 Oral Interpreta- 
tion unless he specifically plans to be a teacher of Speech, in which 
case he will be required to take 300 Speech Correction— Principles 
and Methods instead. The remaining hours required for the major 
will be spent in departmental electives that suit the student's needs 
and interest. The major must maintain an average of 2.50 in the 
Speech courses. 

To satisfy the requirements for a minor in Speech a student 
must complete 18 semester hours of work in the departmental 
offerings in speech and drama. This number includes 100 Funda- 
mentals of Public Speaking; 330 Phonetics of American English; 
370 Play Directing; and either 220 Oral Interpretation or a course 
in dramatic literature, 

090 CORRECTIVE SPEECH 

2 hours per week. (No college credit) 

A course that must be passed by teachers' college students who 
have defective speech. Must be taken before student begins practice 
teaching. 

*100 FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) 

An introduction to the principles and practice of public speak- 
ing. Emphasis placed on the informative speech. Required of all 
freshmen. 

200 VOICE AND DICTION 

2 hours per week. (Credit 2 hours.) Second Semester. 

Analysis of articulatory and vocal usage as they relate to spoken 
language. Improvement of skills in voice, articulation, and pro- 
nunciation. 



If a student has a superior record on his entrance examination 
and if he is recommended by the Speech Division as a candidate 
for exemption from Speech 100, he may request an examination 
prior to registration to exempt him from that course. 



128 



215 GROUP DISCUSSION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Theory aad methods of group discussion; practice in forums, 
panels, etc. 

218 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

RJietorical and psychological principles involved in influencing 
individuals and groups. Practice in the composition and delivery 
of the persuasive speech. 

Prerequisite: 100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking. 

220 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

General principles of oral reading and the art of interpretation 
in poetry, drama, and the short story. 

Prerequisite: 100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking and con- 
sent of the instructor. 

270 ACTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The theory and practice of acting. Improvisation and dra- 
matic scenes. The study of the principles and practices of stage 
make-up as an adjunct to the actor's art. 

280 STAGECRAFT 

2 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

A study of the technical aspects of play production including 
scenery construction, scenery rigging, stage machinery, stage light- 
ing, costume construction and theater management. (The third 
credit hour is earned by work on the technical aspects of the college 
drama productions.) , 

300 SPEECH CORRECTION-PRINCIPLES AND METHODS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

The educational principles that govern, in general, the teach- 
ing of execptional children, and, in particular, the teaching of 
speech and hearing handicapped children. 

312, 313 HISTORY OF THE DRAMATIC FORM 
See description under English 312, 313. 

320 ADVANCED ORAL INTERPRETATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 



129 



The study of special types of literature for oral interpretation. 
Includes principles of selection, cutting, and oral presentation of 
these types. A final recital program is required. 

Prerequisite: 220 Oral Interpretation of Literature. 

330 PHONETICS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Instruction in the analysis of the speech sounds of American 
English and the use of phonetic symbols to record them. Empha- 
sizes ear training, phonetic transcription, and language records. 

Prerequisite: 100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking. 

340 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Essentials of argumentation; research, analysis, evidence, rea- 
soning, case construction, and refutation; applications in public 
speaking and college debate. 

370 PLAY DIRECTING 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The theory and practice of play directing. Analysis of plays 
for production, play casting, and the process of rehearsal. Each 
student has opportunities for the practice of directing. 

380 DESIGN FOR THE STAGE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

The theory and practice of designing scenery for the stage. 
Includes a study of the relationship of the set design to the script 
and other elements of production; an examination of research 
techniques in preparation for scene designing and practice in de- 
signing scenery for many styles and types of drama. 

Prerequisite: 280 Stagecraft or consent of the instructor. 

390 CHILDREN'S THEATER 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

The technique and theory of playmaking for children. Par- 
ticipation in story telling, story dramatization and production, im- 
provisation, rhythms, pantomine, and puppetry. 

430 SPEECH SCIENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) First Semester. 

Lectures, readings, discussions, and demonstrations presenting 
the structure and function of the physiological systems involved in 
respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation. Attention 



130 



given to the fundamentals of the physiology of the speech mechan- 
ism and the physics of sound transmission. 

Prerequisite; 330 Phonetics of American English. 

450 CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPEECH CORRECTION 

2 or 4 hours per week. {Credit 2 to 4 hours.) Second Semester. 

Clinical observation of and practice in corrective procedures 
with various types of speech disorders in the college speech clinic, 
the Lida Lee Tall School, and the public schools. 

Credit is for 2 to 4 semester hours, depending upon the number 
of hours of assigned observation and practice. 

Prerequisite: 300 Speech Correction. 

470 ADVANCED PLAY DIRECTING 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) Second Semester. 

Directing the period drama. Research techniques and ap- 
proaches through the study of one representative period. Individ- 
ual short directing projects and a final major production as a class 
project. 

Prerequisite: 370 Play Directing or consent of the instructor. 

THE TEACHING OF SPEECH AND DRAMA IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

4 hours per week for eight weeks. Second Semester. 

Credited as Education 389. Course description on page (71). 



131 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

PURPOSE 

The Master of Education program is intended to help success- 
ful, certified Maryland elementary school teachers to improve their 
professional qualifications. Although built around a core of re- 
quired courses, the program is tailored to suit the needs and inter- 
ests of the individual as indicated by (a) his undergraduate record, 
(b) the demands of his position as a classroom teacher, and (c) the 
considered judgments of his supervisors, employers, and college 
teachers. Since the program is planned primarily for teachers in 
service, the courses are offered principally during the summer ses- 
sion and in the evening. 

OBJECTIVES 

1. To help successful teachers continue to develop under- 
standings and appreciations characteristic of broadly edu- 
cated individuals. 

2. To enable teachers of professional promise to increase their 
competence as teachers. 

3. To increase the student's appreciation of the role of the 
teacher and of education in our complex world order. 

4. To provide a deeper and more functional understanding of 
human growth and development. 

5. To encourage a spirit of inquiry and to develop an ac- 
quaintance with recent studies in one's field of interest. 

6. To assist teachers in building more effective ways of work- 
ing with students, professional colleagues, and residents of 
their community. 

ADMISSION 

Full admission is granted in the order of the receipt of applica- 
tions on the basis of (a) an undergraduate average of B, (b) an 
interview with a graduate council member, and (c) two years of 
satisfactory teaching experience. 

The Admission procedure is as follows: 

1. Obtain an application blank from the Director of Admis- 
sions, Graduate Division. 

2. Fill out and return the form to the Admissions Office, 
Graduate Division, and request the registrar of each college 
previously attended to send a transcript to the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Await a call from the college for an appointment with a 
member of the graduate council or admissions staflE. 



132 



ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE 

Those wishing to become degree candidates should make appli- 
cation to the Dean of Instruction after completion of nine to twelve 
semester hours including three required courses (but not the 
thesis), attainment of a B average, and approval by the faculty 
adviser of a tentative degree program. Other considerations upon 
which favorable action will be based are: completion of two or 
more years of meritorious service as a teacher and a satisfactory score 
on the Teacher Education Examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

A. Completion of a program approved by an adviser includ- 
ing at least 30 semester hours with a B average. 

1. The 12 hours of required courses. These include the 
Master of Education Thesis. The introduction to the 
thesis may be written while completing the introduc- 
tion to research course. The thesis is to be completed 
in accordance with the plan outlined in "Steps Toward 
the Master of Education Degree." 

2. A distribution of the 18 elective hours so that 12 are 
in one or more of the departments other than Educa- 
tion. 

B. Satisfactory performance on a written examination and 
an oral interview that will relate principles of each stu- 
dent's special area of interest to the required courses. 

EXPENSES-GRADUATE 

The tuition cost is $15.00 per semester hour. There is a regis- 
tration fee for non-Maryland residents of $15.00. There is a dip- 
loma fee of $10.00 payable during the first week of the term in 
which requirements are to be completed. Of the diploma fee ap- 
proximately $5.00 will be applied to thesis-binding charges, with 
the remainder of the binding cost of approximately $5.00 paid by 
the candidate. 

During the summer session a weekly fee of $10.00 includes 
room and two meals a day (breakfast and dinner) Monday through 
Friday. Luncheon may be purchased in the cafeteria. Meals will 
not be served on the weekends. Students may, of course, occupy 
their rooms over the weekends and take meals outside. A fee of 
$2.50 for the use of service rooms and mail box will be charged 
summer resident students. 

In addition to the above expenses, there will be only those for 
books and incidental expenses. 

Fees are due on registration day and at the time of registration 
for those who register by mail. By special arrangaments board may 



133 



be paid in two installments. A fee of $5.00 is assessed for those who 
fail to complete registration by the time of the first class meeting. 
No late registrations will be accepted after the third day of a 
session. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level work may 
be transferred from other accredited institutions. 

TIME LIMITATION 

All work credited toward the master's degree must be com- 
pleted within a seven-year period. 

THE STUDENT ADVISORY PROGRAM 

A General Adviser is appointed by the Dean of Students during 
the first term of study, after consultation with the student. Duties 
include: assisting students in understanding requirements, plan- 
ning programs, selecting courses, and with personal problems. 

A Research Adviser is appointed on the joint recommendation 
of the General Adviser, the student, and the chairman of the de- 
partment in the proposed area of specialization. Primary respon- 
sibility: problems relating to the thesis. 

GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES 

At least one-half of the student's courses must be at the 500 
level, designed exclusively for graduate students. Other courses 
may be taken at the 400 level (open to juniors and seniors), but the 
instructor will expect graduate students to do graduate level work 
in these courses. 

Seniors in their final semester may request permission to regis- 
ter for as many as six semester hours of 500 level if they are within 
six semester hours of completing their baccalaureate degree require- 
ment and if their undergraduate work has been of sufficiently high 
calibre. (These six hours may count toward the master's degree if 
they are in excess of the baccalaureate degree requirement.) 

THE REQUIRED CORE OF COURSES 

5.505 EDUCATIONAL IDEAS IN HISTORICAL 
PERSPECTIVE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) {Offered each summer and 
occasionally during the winter when there is sufficient demand.) 

Current trends and issues in education as reflecting and in- 
fluencing the social, economic, and political forces in our cultural 
heritage. (Students should include this course among their first six 
semester hours in the program.) 



134 



I 



5.506 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

A study of research as a method for solving problems. Contri- 
butions of research to education. Research processes and procedures. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Tests and Measure- 
ments, or Elementary Statistics, or consent of instructor. 

20.501 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT- 
ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

An advanced course designed for graduate students who have 
had a basic course in Human Growth and Development or Child 
Psychology. 

A study of the basic factors in the development of human be- 
havior with an emphasis on social-cultural learning. The nature 
and conditions of learning as related to physiological, psychological, 
and sociological development are studied in the light of school 
practice. A review of contemporary theories of learning and their 
curricular implications. 

5.590 MASTER OF EDUCATION THESIS 

{Credit 3 hours.) 

A carefully executed investigation and accurate recording of 
a specific problem selected with reference to the student's profes- 
sional goals and resources. Historical, descriptive, experimental, 
or action research can provide a single or multiple framework with- 
in which the student may work. Includes an outline of the pro- 
posed thesis submitted for inspection and approval by the Gradu- 
ate Council, an application of techniques derived from the research 
course, and the guidance of Research Adviser. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following courses will be scheduled for one evening a 
week during the academic year, or during the six-week summer ses- 
sion, in accordance with demands indicated by (a) written requests 
and (b) preregistrations conducted by the college. For course des- 
criptions and prerequisites see Courses of Instruction beginning on 
page (57). 

Art 414-415 SPECIAL ART PROBLEMS 

3 fo 6 hours per week. {Credit 2 to 4 hours.) 

Education 401 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 402 JUVENILE LITERATURE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



135 



Education 410a FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 
3 hours per week. [Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 420 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 426a METHODS AND PRINCIPLES OF 
READING INSTRUCTION-ADVANCED 

3 hours per week. (Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 430 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL- 
ADVANCED COURSE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 435 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 450a GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL- 
ELEMENTARY 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 451a THE CORE PROGRAM IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 508 SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF 
ARITHMETIC 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 509 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
SCIENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 510 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Education 526 SELECTED ASPECTS OF METHODS AND 
MATERIALS IN THE TEACHING OF READING IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 405 LITERARY CRITICISM 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

English 422 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH 

NOVEL 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



136 



English 440, 441 SEMINAR IN ENGLISH STUDIES 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Health 405a SCHOOL HEALTH MATERIALS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Mathematics 401 PROBABILITY & STATISTICAL 
INFERENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Mathematics 431 CONCEPTS OF MODERN 
MATHEMATICS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Mathematics 433 HIGHER ALGEBRA 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Philosophy 401 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 404 PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 405 PERSONALITY, ITS ANALYSIS, 
DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 420 MENTAL HYGIENE 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 502a SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Psychology 503 SEMINAR IN SELECTED PROBLEMS IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Science 400 PHYSICAL SCIENCE IV 

4 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Science 402 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Science 500 SELECTED GENERAL PRINCIPLES IN 
BIOLOGY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



137 



Social Science 401 GROWTH OF GEOGRAPHIC 
THOUGHT 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 405 CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 413 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 414 INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. [Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 415 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 416 RECENT HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 420a PROSEMINAR IN HISTORY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 421 THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN 
REVOLUTION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 430 PROSEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN 
GEOGRAPHY 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 502 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF 
WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Social Science 503 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Speech 430 SPEECH SCIENCE 

3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 

Speech 450 CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPEECH 
CORRECTION 

2, 3, or 4 hours per week. {Credit 2, 3, or 4 hours.) 

Speech 470 ADVANCED PLAY DIRECTING 
3 hours per week. {Credit 3 hours.) 



138 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

AND TRUSTEES OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

President: Jerome Framptom, Jr., Federalsburg 
* Vice-President: George C. Rhoderick, Jr., Middletown 
** Vice-President: Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Chevy Chase 
Secretary and State Superintendent of Schools: 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Members: * Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Chevy Chase 
Mrs. J. WiLMER Cronin, Aberdeen 
** C. William Hetzer, WiHiamsport 
D wight O. W. Holmes, Baltimore 
Richard Schifter, Bethesda 
William L. Wilson, Cumberland 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Earle T. Hawkins, President 

Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 

Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 

Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 

Hazel L. Bowman, Registrar 

Karl J. Moser, Business Manager 

Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 

Nancy Lester Duncan, Director of Residence Halls 

Mariana H. Ward, Director of Health Services 

Ethel G. Gardner, Dietitian 

Odin Tidemand, Maintenance Superintendent 

FACULTY AND STAFF, 1960-1962 

Earle T. Hawkins, President 

A.B., Western Maryland College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., Western Maryland Col- 
lege 

Kenneth A. Browne, Dean of Instruction 

A.B., Hastings College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania; LL.D., Doane College 
Orrielle Murphy, Dean of Students 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

Robert W. Abendroth, Education 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Ed., University of Vermont; graduate 

study. Temple University 

* Position held 1960-61 but not 1961-62 
** Position held 1961-62 but not 1960-61 



139 



Clifford D. Alper, Music 

B.M., M.M., University o£ Miami; graduate study. Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 

Cleg C. Ammen, Psychology (Appointed February 1961) 
A.B., Goucher College; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Herbert D. Andrews, History 

A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwestern University; graduate 
study, Northwestern University (On leave 1961-62) 
Allene B. Archer, Mathematics 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.Ed., University of Virginia; 
graduate study, Harvard University, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

John R. Bareham, Physical Science 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 
Robert D. Beckey, Mathematics 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Ed., Miami University; graduate 
study. University of Maryland, University of Wisconsin 
** Herman E. Behling, Jr., Assistant Principal, Lida Lee Tall 

School 
B.S. in Ed., Kent State University; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity 

George A. Beishlag, Geography 

A.B., Wayne University; M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University 

of Maryland 

* * Perra S. Bell, History (Part-time) 

B.A., New York University; M.A., John Hopkins University 

** Susie M. Bellows, Education 

A.B., College of Charleston; M.A., George Peabody College for 

Teachers; graduate study, George Peabody College for Teachers 

* Alma Bent, Education 

B.S., Wheelock College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study, Teachers College, Columbia University 
L. Edward Bevins, English 

A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Corinne T. Bize, Health, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., 
Teachers College, Columbia University 
Marjorie F. Bleul, Physical Education 

(Full time 1960-61, Part-time 1961-62) 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.Ed., Loyola College; graduate 
study, Johns Hopkins University 
Arnold Blumberg, History 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania J 



140 



John P. Bollinger, Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester; M.M., 
School of Music, University of Michigan; ^aduate study. Univer- 
sity of Iowa, Johns Hopkins University 

Maynard C. Bowers, Biological Science 

A.B., Albion College; M.Ed., University of Virginia 

Hazel L. Bowman, Registrar 

A.B., Florida State University; M.A., University of Florida; gradu- 
ate study, University of Maryland 

Ella Bramblett, Education 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; graduate study, Colorado State College of Educa- 
tion 

Arthur W. Brewington, Speech 

A.B., Asbury College; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., George Pea- 
body College for Teachers 
Thelma S. Brewington, Speech 

B.A., Cotner College; M.A., University of Denver; graduate study, 
Colorado State College of Education, New York University, Univer- 
sity of Missouri, Johns Hopkins University 

** Jean G. Brown, Physical Education 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.A,, Ph.D., New York University 

Maud J. Broyles, Education 

A.B., Concord College; M.A., Northwestern University; Ed.D., 

Teachers College, Columbia University 

Grayson S. Burrier, Education 

A.B., Catawba College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. University of Maryland 

Donald L. Cassatt, Psychology 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.L., Ph.D., 

University of Pittsburgh 

** Marie L. M. Cazaudebat, Modern Languages 

B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., State University 

of Iowa; graduate study, the Sorbonne, Paris 

Ann Mary Cimino, Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; graduate study. Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

George C. Coleman, History^ Political Science 

A.B., The College of the Ozarks; M.A., University of Oklahoma; 

Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

David L. Cornthwaite, Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University; graduate study. University of Maryland 

Esther S. Coulange, Music 

B.S., Indiana State College, Pennsylvania; M.A., New York Univer- 
sity; graduate study, University of Rochester 



141 



Louis T. Cox, Physical Science 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 
Eunice K. Crabtree, English 

A.B., M.A., George Washington University; Ed.D., Johns Hopkins 
University 

CoMPTON N, Crook, Biological Science 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study, 
George Peabody College for Teachers, Johns Hopkins University, 
Arizona State University 

Jane Daniels, Physical Education 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 
Norman R. Diffenderfer, Geography 

B.S., State Teachers College, Shippensburg; M.A., University of 
Nebraska; graduate study. University of Nebraska 
** Barbara A. Dreyer, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall 

School 
B.S., Concordia Teachers College; M.Ed., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity; graduate study. University of Wisconsin 
Nancy Lester Duncan, Director of Residence Hall 
A.B., MacMurray College; M.S., Indiana University 

John Duro, Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Syracuse University; graduate study. New York 

University 

* Charles R. Eberhardt, Philosophy (Part-time) 
B.S., New York University; S.T.B., S.T.M., Biblical Seminary in 
New York; Ph.D., Drew University 
* * Phyllis S. Elliott, English 

B,S. in Ed., Kent State University; M.S. in Speech, University of 
Wisconsin; graduate study, Kent State University 
Howard R. Erickson, Biological Science 

B.S., Indiana State College, Pennsylvania; M.S., Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Joseph A. Falco, History, Economics 

B.A., Duquesne University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Mary Lee Farlow, Assistant Director of Residence Halls 
A.B., Elon College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, Greens- 
boro 

** Jonas J. Fendell, Art (Part-time, first semester) 
B.F.A., M.F.A., Syracuse University 

David Firman, Geography 

B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland 



142 



** Victor B. Fisher, Sociology 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 
Regina I. Fitzgerald, Education 

A.B., Western Maryland College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Mary- 
land 

Herbert N. Foerstel, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Hamilton College; M.A. in Library Science, Rutgers Univer- 
sity 

Ethel G. Gardiner, Dietitian 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins School of 

Hygiene and Public Health 

** Melvin R. Garland, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., M.Ed., State Teachers College, Frostburg 

* Katharine Gilcoyne, Health, Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

** C. Richard Gillespie, Drama, Speech 

B.A., Principia College; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

Carolyn E. Graeser, Physical Education 

B.S., West Virginia University 

W. Frank Guess, English 

A.B., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North Carolina 

David F. Guillaume, Art 

B.F.A., Alfred University; M.A., Syracuse University; graduate 

study, Ohio State University, University of Michigan 

* R. Margaret Hamilton, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall 

School 
B.S., Frostburg State Teachers College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University; graduate study. University of Maryland 
Paul E. Hanson, English 

B.A., San Francisco State College; M.A., New York University; 
graduate study. University of California, New York University 
William H. Hartley, Education— Director of Secondary Program 
B.S., Springfield College; M.A,, Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

** Jane E. Hartman, Health and Physical Education 
B.S., New York University; M.A., Los Angeles State College; gradu- 
ate study, New York University 

Charles A. Haslup, Music 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., University of Mary- 
land; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University (On 
leave first semester, 1961-62) 

Wilfred B. Hathaway, Biological Science 

B.S., Massachusetts State College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; 

Ph.D., Cornell University 



143 



Genevieve Heagney, Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.A., Cornell University; Ed.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 

** Elaine R. Hedges, English (Part-time) 

A.B,, Barnard College; M.A., RadcliflEe College; graduate study. 

Harvard University 

Ruth Ann Heidelbach, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Ed., University of Florida 

Marjorie R. Henry, English, Speech 

A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Alice A. Holden, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., University of Mary- 
land; graduate study, Mexico City College, University of Maryland 
Gladys C. Hughes, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
A.B., Women's College, University of North Carolina; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; graduate study. New York Univer- 
sity, John Hopkins University 

Nina Hughes, English, Speech 

A.B., Florida State College for Women; M.A., Catholic University 
of America; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University, Northwes- 
tern University 

Harry M. Hutson, History 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Helen Ice, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., University of Mary- 
land 

Edward R. Johnston, History, Admissions 

B.S.S., Spring Hill College; M.A., University of Detroit; graduate 

study, Rutgers University 

Mary Catherine Kahl, History 

A.B., M.A., University of Maryland; graduate study. University of 

Wisconsin 

Earl W. Killian, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study. New York University 

** Theodora R. Kimsey, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall 

School 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

** Rita Rae Kolb, Mathematics 
B.S.E., M.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute 

* William C. Kramer, Drama, Speech 
B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Columbia University; graduate 
study, New York University 



144 



** Patricia S. Kruppa, History 

B.A., University of Houston; M.A., Columbia University; graduate 

study, Columbia University 

** John Christian Larsen, Associate Librarian 

B.Des., M.A., A.M.L.S., University of Michigan 

Robert E. Laubach, Mathematics (Part-time) 

A.B., Eastern Michigan University; M.S., University of Michigan 

Caryl E. Lewis, Biological Science 

B.A., Western Maryland College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College 

John Smith Lewis, English 

A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Brown University; Ph.D., New 

York University 

Samuel J. Lisanti, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.S., State Teachers College at Frostburg; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University, 

Columbia University 

* Kathryn T. Louka, Sociology (Second semester) 
B.A., M.A., George Washington University 

* * Hazel E. MacDonald, Music (Part-time, first semester) 
B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

* Frank A, Mann, Psychology, Education (First semester) 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Carmelina Marino, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Boston University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Curtis V. Martin, Geography 

B.S., Trenton State College; M.A., Clark University; graduate study, 
Clark University 

John Carter Matthews, History 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Paul F. Mattingly, Geography 

B.S., Western Illinois University; M.A., University of Missouri; 
Ph.D. (1961), Pennsylvania State University 
John W. McCleary, History 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Robert Melville, Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State Cojlege; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University 

* G. H. Miller, Mathematics 

B.A., Pomona College; M.Ed., Temple University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Southern California 

Lloyd D. Miller, Art 

B.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Harvard University; graduate 

study. New York University 



145 



Jean C. Milnor, Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Goucher College; M.S. in Library Science, Syracuse Univer- 
sity 

Donald I. Minnegan, Physical Education^ Director of Athletics 
B.Phys.Ed., Springfield College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., 
George Washington University 
John B. Mitchell, Art 

B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study, 
Teachers College, Columbia University; New York University (On 
leave 1960-1961 and first semester 1961-1962) 
Frances C. Moore, Assistant Librarian 
A.B., Goucher College 
William T. Moorefield, Physical Science 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.Ed., Loyola College; graduate 
study. University of Maryland 

Harold E. Moser, Director of Testing Services, Psychology 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Duke University 
Karl J. Moser, Business Manager 

B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., George Washington 
University; graduate study, George Washington University, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Catholic University of America, Johns Hopkins 
University 

Harold E. Muma, Biological Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Maryland; graduate study, University of 
Maryland (On leave, 1960-1961) 

Samuel H. Nass, Art 

B.S., Ohio University; M.F.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 
Richard G. Nelson, Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.Ed., Ohio University; graduate study, 
Ohio University 

** Lowell B. Nesbitt, Art (Part-time, first semester) 
B.F.A., Tyler School of Fine Art, Temple University; A.R.C.A., 
Royal College of Art, London 
Edward Neulander, Psychology, Education 

B.S., City College of New York; M.S., Cornell University; Ed.D., 
Cornell University 

* MiRKo M. NussBAUM, Physics (Part-time) 
A.B., Rutgers University; S.M., University of Chicago 

Lois D. Odell, Biological Science 

A.B., New York State College for Teachers at Albany; M.A., Ph.D., 

Cornell University 

Charles C. Onion, History 

B.S., University of Minnesota; B.M., MacPhail School of Music; 

M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 



146 



* Willie E. Page, Jr., English 

A.B., East Carolina College; M.A., Florida State University 

William F. Pelham, Physical Science 

B.Ch.E., Clarkson College of Technology; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 

** Frances R. Perkins, Mathematics 

B.A., Westhampton College, University of Richmond; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Delaware; graduate study. University of Virginia 

Patrick C. Phelan, Jr., College Physician (Part-time) 
A.B., Loyola College; M.D., University of Maryland 

James A. Phillips, Jr., Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Salisbury; M.Ed., University of Mary- 
land; Ed.D. (1961), Michigan State University 

Stanley M. Pollack, Art 

B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University; graduate study, New York University 

Dorothy W. Reeder, Librarian 

A.B., Susquehanna University; B.S., in Library Science, Drexel In- 
stitute of Technology; M.A. in Library Science, University of 
Michigan 

Carl Reitenbach, Health 

B.S., State University of New York, College of Education at Cort- 
land; M.A., New York University; graduate study, Columbia Uni- 
versity 

* * Martin R. Rice, Music 

B.Mus.Ed., University of Wichita; M.Mus., University of Michigan; 
graduate study. University of Illinois, University of Erlangen, Ger- 
many 

Mary E. Roach, Physical Education 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity 

* Theodore C. Roth, Assistant Principal, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., State University of New York, College of Education at New 
Paltz; M.A., Stanford University; graduate study, Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Edward I. Rubendall, Physical Science 

A.B., Illinois College; M.S., University of Illinois; graduate study. 

University of Illinois 

Nellie Mae Ruston, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers; graduate study, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 
University, Oklahoma State University 

* Betty C. Ryburn, Sociology (First semester) 
A.S., A.B., Marshall College; M.A., Ohio University 



147 



Marion Stiles Sargent, English 

A.B., Trinity University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 

University of Texas 

Julia R. Sawyer, English 

A.B.j Bennington College; M.A., Johns Hopkins University 

Harvey L. Saxton, Psychology, Reading 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Connecticut 

* Lenora Schwartz, Art 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Temple University; graduate study. University of 
Pennsylvania, Columbia University 

Marguerite S. Seaman, Supervising Teacher, Lida Lee Tall School 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; A.M., University of Chicago (On 
leave 1961-1962) 

* Ruby Shubkagle, Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity 

* Ellen E. Smith, Assistant Librarian 

B.S., Millersville State College; B.S. in Library Science, Trenton 
State College 

Carlton W. Sprague, Education 

A.B., Bard College; M.A., University of North Carolina; graduate 
study. University of North Carolina 
** Phoebe B. Stanton, -4 rf (Part-time, first semester) 
B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of London 

* Kenneth T. Stringer, Biological Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Rebecca C. Tansil, Director of Admissions 

A.B., University of Tennessee; M.A., George Peabody College for 

Teachers; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Beatrice June Thearle, English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland 

** Jean R.. ToMKo, Assistant Librarian 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.S. in L.S., Drexel Institute 

Zenith Hurst Velie, Education— Director of Kindergarten-Primary 

Program 
B.Mus., Palmer College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; M.Ed., University of Maryland; graduate study, Johns Hopkins 
University, Northwestern University, Syracuse University 

Marvin C. Volpel, Mathematics 

A.B., Western Michigan University; M.A., University of Michigan; 

Ed.D., Michigan State University 

Ernst O. von Schwerdtner, Modern Languages 

A.B., St. Johns College; graduate study, Johns Hopkins University 



148 



Allen A. Walker, Biological Science 

B.A., Hobart College; M.A., University o£ Texas; graduate study, 

Indiana University 

Vernon Wanty, English, News Bureau 

B.A., Westminster College; M.A., Michigan State University; gradu- 
ate study, Michigan State University, Johns Hopkins University, 
University of Maryland 

Mariana H. Ward, Director of Health Services 

R.N., Oglethorpe Sanitarium; B.S., Western Reserve University 

Emma E. Weyforth, Music (Full time 1960-61, part-time first se- 
mester 1961-62) 
A.B., Goucher College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; graduate study. Teachers College, Columbia University 

Walter W. Williamson, Education 

A.B., Lafayette College; Ed.M., Temple University; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania (On leave, 1960-61) 

A. Isabel Wilner, Assistant Librarian, Lida Lee Tall School 

B.A., William Smith College; B.S. in Library Science, Carnegie 

Institute of Technology 

Neil Dean Wilson, Psychology 

B.S., State University of New York, College of Education at Brock- 
port; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, American University 

Phineas p. Wright, English 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Virginia; gradu- 
ate study. University of Michigan, University of Virginia 

Arthur C. Yarbrough, Jr., Physical Science 

B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., George Peabody College for 

Teachers; graduate study, George Peabody College for Teachers 

Merle Yoder, Assistant Librarian 

Diploma in Library Science, Western Reserve University; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland 

Mildred Zindler, Art 

A.B., Florida State University; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University 

Margaret C. Zipp, Mathematics 

B.S., Douglass College, Rutgers University; M.A., University of 
Pittsburgh; graduate study, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Clark 
University, University of Pennsylvania 



149 



OTHER STAFF MEMBERS AND ASSISTANTS*** 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

** Judith A. Allan, Senior Stenographer 

RosEMARiE C. CuLOTTA, Senior Stenographer 

Ruth S. Davis, Receptionist and Switchboard Operator 

Adda L. Gilbert, Administrative Assistant I 

Frances Gill, Stenographer-Secretary 

Kathryn S. Gordon, Principal Stenographer 

John S. Gwynn, Reproduction Machines Operator 

Arline p. Wildason, Stenographer-Secretary 

FACULTY OFFICES 

Margaret V. Barrett, Senior Stenographer 

EsTELLE H. Edson, Senior Stenographer 

Marguerite S, German, Senior Stenographer 

Lela B, Magness, Senior Stenographer 

** Elizabeth J. Sherman, Senior Stenographer 

Dolores R. Zinkand, Senior Stenographer 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Margaret G. Barall, Principal Account Clerk II 

Ruth J. Bartol, Senior Account Clerk 

* Geraldine Burkowski, Senior Account Clerk 
Jane E. Eagler, Principal Account Clerk I 
Helen B. Kelly, Post Office Clerk 

Helen V. Redel, Principal Account Clerk I 
** Mary E. Stromberg, Junior Account Clerk 
** Mary M. Tucholka, Senior Clerk 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE 

* Patricia L. Faber, Senior Stenographer 
Louise C. Just, Senior Stenographer 

C. Elizabeth O wings, Stenographer-Secretary 

REGISTRAR'S AND RECORDS OFFICE 

* Marjie L. Baughman, Senior Typist 
** Marie A, Conn, Senior Typist 
Agnes T. Debauch, Assistant Registrar 
Anna B. Gladu, Senior Clerk 

Ann L. Kelleher, Senior Typist 

Ethel L. Richmond, Senior Stenographer 

** Margaret Strausser, Senior Typist 



150 



ALBERT S. COOK LIBRARY 
June M. Baines, Senior Typist 
Eleanor E. Becker, Library Assistant 
Bernice K. Cox, Principal Stenographer 
Larry A. Davis, Junior Clerk 
Annemarie C. Mayer, Senior Clerk 
M. Louise Pace, Library Assistant 

LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 

Winifred N. Baker, Stenographer-Secretary 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Mary E. Basler, Supervisor of Residence, Newell Hall 

Laura E. Brennan, Supervisor of Residence, Newell Hall 

Florence A. Clements, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 

** Victor B. Fisher, Faculty Counselor (Part-time), West Hall 

** Anna R. Flannagan, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 

* Robert Melville, Faculty Counselor (Part-time), West Hall 

* * Edwin P. Maxim, Food Service Manager I 

* Florence Perrine, Supervisor of Residence, Richmond Hall 
Elizabeth E. Starr, Senior Stenographer 

Virginia K. Tilghman, Supervisor of Residence, Prettyman Hall 
Josephine Wagemann, Supervisor of Residence, Ward Hall 

HEALTH CENTER 

Donna Jean Curtis, Registered Nurse 

Helen Porter, Licensed Practical Nurse 

STUDENT CENTER 

Esther Barrett, Student Center Hostess (Part-time) 

Margaret A. Drost, "Snack Bar" Manager 

Rose Lee Gilbert, Book Shop Assistant 

** Constance H. Palmieri, "Snack Bar" Night Manager 

(Part-time) 
Sue W. Richardson, Book Shop Manager 
Nancy Walbeck, Student Center Hostess (Part-time) 
Mattie E. Ward, Student Center Hostess (Part-time) 

* Amelia Warner, "Snack Bar" Night Manager (Part-time) 

* Position held 1960-61 but not 1961-62 
** Position held 1961-62 but not 1960-61 

* * * Alphabetical listing with most recent position 



151 



COOPERATING TEACHERS 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY DIVISION 

1960 - 1961 

Mrs. Charlotte Albrecht, Kindergarten, Robert Poole Elemen- 
tary School 
Mrs. Muella Bivens, Grade one, Pangborn Boulevard Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Catherine Burke, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 
Mrs. Dorothy Busick, Kindergarten, Franklin D. Roosevelt Ele- 
mentary School 
Miss Ann Carney, Grade two. Fuller ton Elementary School 
Mrs. Virginia Churchill, Grade one, Lutherville Elementary 

School 
Miss Berenice Cronin, Kindergarten, Yorkwood Elementary School 
Mrs. Viola Dischler, Kindergarten, Gardenville Elementary School 
Miss Violet Garren, Kindergarten, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Gertrude Gary, Grade three, FallstafiE Elementary School 
Miss Betty Getz, Grade three, Franklin D. Roosevelt Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Catherine Gill, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Melva Kerby, Grade one, Hillcrest Heights Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Arelyn Mahan, Grade three, Rodgers Forge Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Mary Jane Martin, Grade three, Edmonson Heights Elemen- 
tary School 
Mrs. Margaret Nauman, Kindergarten, Mordecai Gist Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Peggy Nottingham, Grade two, Montebello Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Virginia Rushworth, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Virginia Schorr, Kindergarten, Benjamin Franklin Elemen- 
tary School 
Mrs. Florence Udel, Grade one, Montebello Elementary School 
Miss Yvette Velie, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 
Miss Iris Zimmerman, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 

1961 - 1962 
Mrs. Catherine Burke, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 
Mrs. Esther Callahan, Grade one, Welhvood Elementary School 
Miss Kathleen Claggett, Kindergarten, Graceland Park-O'Donnell 
Heights Elementary School 



152 



Miss Berenice Cronin, Kindergarten, Yorkwood Elementary School 
Mrs. Viola Dischler, Kindergarten, Gardenville Elementary School 
Mrs. Josephine Fox, Grade one, Rosedale Elementary School 
Miss Betty Getz, Grade two, Mt. Royal Elementary School 
Mrs. Catherine Gill, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 
Mrs. Virginia Kiefer, Grade one, Edmondson Heights Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Leone LaMotte, Grade three, Franklin Elementary School 
Miss June Macauley, Grade two, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Arelyn Mahan, Grade three, Rodgers Forge Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Margaret Nauman, Kindergarten, Mordecai Gist Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Ruth Ritter, Grade two, Arlington Elementary School 
Mrs. Shirley Smith, Grade two, Waverly Elementary School 
Mrs. Betty Topp, Grade three, Waverly Elementary School 
Mrs. Joan Trent, Grade one, Elmwood Elementary School 
Miss Yvette Velie, Grade one, Arlington Elementary School 
Miss Patricia Waters, Grade one, Montebello Elementary School 
Miss Iris Zimmerman, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary School 

ELEMENTARY DIVISION 

1960 - 1961 
Miss Betty Alevizatos, Grade two, Northwood Elementary School 
Miss Catherine Anders, Grade jive, Westminster Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Janice Bennett, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs, Ruth Braun, Grade six, Stoneleigh Elementary School 
Mrs. Frances Brooks, Grade four, Edgemere Elementary School 
Mr. Andrew Bunce, Grade six, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Louise Birch, Grade three, Stoneleigh Elementary School 
Miss Elaine Capelli, Grade three, Owings Mills Elementary School 
Mr. Charles Connor, Grade six, Northwood Elementary School 
Mrs. Mariesther Dando, Grade two. Loch Raven Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Elaine Davis, Grade two, Fullerton Elementary School 
Miss Dolores Deardorff, Grade six, Montebello Elementary 

School 

Mr. James Ferdinard, Grade six, Dundalk Elementary School 
Mrs. Helen Fowler, Grade four, Oakleigh Elementary School 
Mrs. Gladys Grimes, Grade four, Franklin Elementary School 
Mrs. Wanna Haught, Grade four, Pangborn Boulevard Elementary 
School 



153 



Miss Norma Hoibroten, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Frances Hooten, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Beatrice Hopper, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 
Mr. Herman Jackson, Grade five, Parkville Elementary School 
Mr. John Koontz, Grade six, Hampton Elementary School 
Miss Helen Linsey, Grade six, Franklin Elementary School 
Mrs, Dorothy Moler, Grade two. Villa Cresta Elementary School 
Mr. Parker Morrill, Grade six, Hampton Elementary School 
Mrs. Ruth Rattan, Grade three, Parkville Elementary School 
Mrs. Lena Reilly, Grade six, Waverly Elementary School 
Miss Mary Jo Robb, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Frieda Schaefer, Grade three. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Shirley Smith, Grade two, Waverly Elementary School 
Mrs. Rena Sugar, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 
Mr. Bernard Taylor, Grade six, Mt, Royal Elementary School 
Mrs. Jean Taylor, Grade five, Montebello Elementary School 
Miss Margaret Tewes, Grade three, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Rosalie Wells, Grade four, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Marcella Wilson, Grade five, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Polly Young, Grade three, Mt. Royal Elementary School 

1961 - 1962 
Mrs. Barbara Beck, Grade four, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Janice Bennett, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mrs. Louise Birch, Grade three, Stoneleigh Elementary School 
Mrs. Wilma Brandenburg, Grade one, Middlesex Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Frances Brooks, Grade four, Edgemere Elementary School 
Mrs. Elizabeth Carr, Grade two, Leith Walk Elementary School 
Mrs. Ruby Churan, Grade one, Hampton Elementary School 
Mrs. Shirley Coleman, Grade five, Hampton Elementary School 
Mrs. Alma Collins, Grade four, Margaret Brent Elementary School 
Mrs. Mariesther Dando, Grade two, Loch Raven Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Elaine Davis, Grade two, Fullerton Elementary School 
Miss Dolores Deardorff, Grade six, Montebello Elementary 

School 
Mr. Felix Dembeck, Grade five, Margaret Brent Elementary School 
Mrs. Mildred Dix, Grade three, Fallstaff Elementary School 
Mrs. Helen Fowler, Grade four, Oakleigh Elementary School 
Mrs. Alice Gibson, Grade one, Fullerton Elementary School 
Mrs. Thelma Gross, Grade five, Middlesex Elementary School 



154 



Mr. Wayne Harmon, Grade six, Hampton Elementary School 
Miss Norma Hoibroten, Grade one, Rodgers Forge Elementary 

School 
Mrs. Katherine Hunt, Grade three, Margaret Brent Elementary 

School 
Mr. Herman Jackson, Grade five, Parkville Elementary School 
Mrs. Sylvia Michaelson, Grade three. Liberty Elementary School 
Mr. Thomas Miller, Grade five, Fallstaff Elementary School 
Miss Gara Morris, Grade five. Loch Raven Elementary School 
Mrs. Ruth Rattan, Grade three, Parkville Elementary School 
Mrs. Lena Reilly, Grade six, Waverly Elementary School 
Mrs. Dorothy Rennie, Grade four, Hampton Elementary School 
Miss Mary Jo Robb, Grade three, Lutherville Elementary School 
Mr. James Skarbeck, Grade six, Westowne Elementary School 
Mrs. Rena Sugar, Grade four. Liberty Elementary School 
Mrs. Jean Taylor, Grade five, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Madalene Taylor, Grade one, Yorkwood Elementary School 
Miss Margaret Tewes, Grade four, Montebello Elementary School 
Mrs. Ruth Trager, Grade one, Franklin Elementary School 
Mrs. Marcella Wilson, Grade five, Lutherville Elementary School 

SECONDARY DIVISION 
1960 - 1961 
Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, History, Pimlico Junior High Sshool 
Mrs. Helen Bartholow, English, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mrs. Lucy I. Bickford, English, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Charlotte Boronow, Core 9, Arbutus Junior High School 
Miss Helen Boswell, English, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mrs. Alma Boyd, Math-Science, Ridgely Junior-Dulaney Senior 

High School 
Mrs. Dorothea Bush, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Miss Jean Casale, Core 7, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. Eugene Childs, Core 8, Ridgely Junior-Dulaney Senior High 

School 
Mrs. Roberta C. Crosby, Core 9, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Theodore L. Danish, Science 8, Sudbrook Junior High School 
Mr. John Darnaby, Science 9 and Math 8, Parkville Junior High 

School 
Mrs. Rebecca B. Davis, Core 8, Hereford Junior-Senior High 

School 
Mr. Rudolph DePaola, History, Gwynns Falls Junior High School 
Miss Lillian DiDomenico, History, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mr. Robert Dinst, Science 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 



155 



Mr. Sylvan Dogoloff, Social Studies, General Henry Lee Junior 

High School 
Mrs. Annette Downs, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Annette Drummond, Science, Woodbourne Junior High 

School 
Mr. Richard Dryden, Core 9, Dundalk Junior High School 
Mr. Hugh Elliott, Math, Stemmers Run Junior High School 
Miss Mary Ensor, Science 9 and Biology, Sudbrook Junior High 

School 
Mr. William H. Farley, Core 9, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Irvin Finifter, Art, Garrison Junior High School 
Mr. Kenneth Gahs, Science 9, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. Craig Gerhard, Geography, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mr. Robert Gist, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Miss Eva Goff, History, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mr. Richard Harple, Geography, Benjamin Franklin Junior High 

School 
Mr. Wilson Herrera, Core 7, Sudbrook Junior High School 
Mr. Robert J. Huber, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Bernard Kalvan, Modern Language, Forest Park Junior High 

School 
Mr. Donald L. Kelbaugh, Science 9, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. John P. Kelly, Core 8, Golden Ring Junior High School 
Mr. Merreen Kelly, Math-Science, Parkville Junior High School 
Mrs. Catherine Law, History, Dunbar Junior-Senior High School 
Miss Mignon Lerp, History, Benjamin Franklin Junior High School 
Mr. Richard Letsch, Core 8, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Mary E. Lilley, Science, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mr. Lawrence C. Little, Math-Science, Towsontown Junior High 

School 
Mr. Robert Ludwig, English, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 
Mr. Franklin Lynch, Core 8, Ridgely Junior-Dulaney Senior High 

School 
Mrs. Cordelia S. Manger, Core 7, Catonsville Junior High School 
Mr. Roger L. Marks, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mrs. Mary B. McBrayer, Core 9, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. Melvin Metzger, Math-Science, Dumbarton Junior High 

School 
Mrs. Stephanie Miller, Science, Pimlico Junior High School 
Miss Louise Nyberg, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Margaret H. Park, Core 9, Catonsville Junior High School 
Mrs. Margaret Payne, Core 7, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Ronald Peterson, History, Hamilton Junior High School 



156 



Mr. Michael Pezzella, Social Studies, Woodbourne Junior High 

School 
Miss Doris E. Polk, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Dorothy Powell, Math-Science, Dumbarton Junior High 

School 
Mr. Ronald Powell, History, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mr. Alfred Proffitt, Geography, Hamilton Junior High School 
Miss Jean Saunders, Core 8, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. Lloyd Shue, Science, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mrs. Edith Sloop, Core 8, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Lois St. John, English, Robert Poole Junior High School 
Mr. Clifton Streat, Algebra and Math 9, Sudbrook Junior High 

School 
Mrs. Elsie A. Streett, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Morris Trent, Core 7, Parkville Junior High School 
Mrs. Lyra Tucker, Core 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mrs. Flora Turner, Geography, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mr. Louis J. Vadorsky, Geography, Clifton Park Junior High 

School 
Mr. Richard Wasserman, Science, Pimlico Junior High School 
Mr. Donald Willem, Math 9, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Norman Wise, History, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mr. Henry Wolpert, History, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mr. Harry D. Woodburn, Math 8, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Bernard Yaffe, English, General Henry Lee Junior High 

School 
Mr. David Yingling, Math-Science, Dumbarton Junior High School 

1961 - 1962 
Mr. Charles Allen, English, Gwynns Falls Junior High School 
Mr. Moses Appel, Math, Forest Park Senior High School 
Mr. Ernest Bennett, History, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 
Mr. James B. Binko, Core 7, Dundalk Junior High School 
Mrs. Anna Bloom, English, Forest Park Senior High School 
Mrs. Peggy M. Bolender, Core 8, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Lawrence C. Bolster, Math, Johnnycake Junior High School 
Mrs. Sadye Bondy, Math, Roland Park Junior High School 
Mrs. Helen Boswell, English, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mrs. a. Jean C. Bourn, Core 7, Golden Ring Junior High School 
Mrs. Katherine C. Browning, Science, Holabird Junior High 

School 
Mr. John F. Burke, Math 9, North Point Junior High School 
Mrs. Dorothea H. Bush, Core 7, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mr. Thomas Carey, History, Polytechnic Institute Senior High 

School 



157 



Mr. Ralph C. Cifizzari, Science 9— Biology, Stemmers Run Junior 

High School 
Mr. James G. Coury, Math, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. John J. Darnaby, Jr., Math-Science, Parkville Junior High 

School 
Mr. Walter Dashiell, Math, Dundalk Junior High School 
Mr. Earl Dorn, Math 1, Bel Air Junior High School 
Mrs. Annette S. Downs, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mrs. Annette G. Drummond, Science, Woodbourne Junior High 

School 
Dr. Claire Eckles, English, Western Senior High School 
Mr. Hugh H. Elliott, Algebra I & II, Stemmers Run Junior High 

School 
Mr. William H. Ford, Math 7, Stemmers Run Junior High School 
Mr. Thomas Foster, Math, Herring Run Junior High School 
Miss Frances A. Garner, English, Towson Senior High School 
Mr. Craig Gerhard, History, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mr. Edward Goedeke, Science 8, Loch Raven Junior High School 
Mr. Morton Greenberg, History, Kenwood Senior High School 
Mr. Thomas Gunning, English, Francis Scott Key Junior High 

School 

Mr. Robert Hanson, Math, Polytechnic Institute Senior High 

School 
Mr. George Harple, History, Herring Run Junior High School 
Mr. Robert Hmieleski, English-Civics, Leonardtown Junior High 

School 

Mr. Robert J. Huber, Core 9, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. Ivan D. Ingram, Science 8, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. Oscar C. Jensen, Core 8, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mr. Wilmer Jones, Math, Herring Run Junior High School 
Mr. Donald L. Kelbaugh, Science, Parkville Junior High School 
Miss Joan E. Keller, Math-Science 7, Towsontown Junior High 

School 
Miss Rose Anna Kottler, Core 7, Ridgely Junior-Dulaney Senior 

High School 
Miss Nancy L. Kotz, Eiiglish, Towson Senior High School 
Mrs. Dorothy S. Leary, Algebra I & II, Dundalk Senior High 

School 
Mr. Clyde A. 1.^^, Algebra I & II, Golden Ring Junior High School 
Mr. Bernard Lerner, History, Herring Run Junior High School 
Mr. Richard W. Letch, Core 8, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Robert Ludwig, English, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 
Mr. Roger L. Marks, Core 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 



158 



Mr. Joseph Marschner, History, Edmondson Senior High School 
Mr. Donald B. Maxwell, Core 7, Middle River Junior High 
Mr. Carl W. Mellott, Math, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Melvin Metzger, Math 7, 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mr. Edmund L. Mitzell, Core S, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Miss Iris Nyberg, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Miss Barbara Nyce, Math, Pimlico Junior High School 
Mrs. Margaret P. Payne, Core 7, Parkville Junior High School 

1961-1962 
Mrs. Isabella Peterson, Math, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mr. Ronald Peterson, History, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mr. Michael Pezzella, History, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Miss Doris E. Polk, Core 7, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. Ronald Powell, History, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mrs. Dorothy B. Powell, Science 7, 8, Dumbarton Junior High 

School 
Mr. Alfred Proffitt, Geography, Hamilton Junior High School 
Mr. Robert A. Roesner, Core 9, Middle River Junior High School 
Mr. William Ryan, Science, Hampstead Hill Junior High School 
Mr. Vincent Salkoski, Math, Clifton Park Junior High School 
Mr. Edward Schmidt, Math, Edmondson Senior High School 
Mr. George Seifert, Math, Roland Park Junior High School 
Mrs. Jane M. Shaffer, English, Dundalk Senior High School 
Mr. Nicholas C. Spinnato, Core 9, Golden Ring Junior High 

School 
Mr. Gilbert W. Stance, Math, Ridgely Junior-Dulaney Senior 

High School 
Mrs. Lois St. John, English, Robert Poole Junior High School 
Mrs. Mary Sudbrink, Social Studies— English 8, Bel Air Junior 

High School 
Mr. John Tridone, History, Herring Run Junior High School 
Mrs. Lyra D. Tucker, Core 9, Dumbarton Junior High School 
Mrs. Flora Turner, Geography, Woodbourne Junior High School 
Mr. Richard Wasserman, Science, Pimlico Junior High School 
Mrs. Eloise C. Weimer, Science, Towsontown Junior High School 
Mr. James Whitehurst, Social Studies 12, Bel Air Senior High 

School 

Mr. Donald E. Willem, Algebra I, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. H. Douglas Woodbourn, Math, Parkville Junior High School 
Mr. David G. Yingling, Math-Science 7, Dumbarton Junior High 
School 



159 



GRADUATES 

Teachers College— June 12, 1960 
Master of Education Degrees 

Bond, Frances Torino, Baltimore City 
Jones, Virginia White, Baltimore County 
Lindsay, Helen Elizabeth, Carroll County 
Pyle, David Arthur, Jr., Baltimore County 

Bachelor of Science Degrees 

Alvaro, Catherine Nancy, Baltimore City 
Amthor, Janet Marie, Baltimore City 
Andolfatto, Antoinette Viola, Pr. George's County 
Badolato, Edward Vernon, Baltimore City 
Balzer, Winifred Elizabeth, Anne Arundel County 
Barczak, Norman Edward, Baltimore City 
Bard, Alvin, Baltimore City 
Barrier, Frank Hal, Baltimore County 
Bauersfeld, Carol Ann, Baltimore County 
Bedfort, Cecilia Dale, Baltimore City 
Behringer, Elizabeth Ehlers, Baltimore County 
Benser, Raymond Kirk, Baltimore City 
Bevard, Martpla Louise, Carroll County 
Bishop, Elnora, Caroline County 
Blake, Ronald Joseph, Baltimore County 
Block, Shirley Ethel, Baltimore County 
Booher, Mary Alice, Carroll County 
Bouis, Frances Crandell, Baltimore County 
Bradley, Richard Michael, Baltimore City 
Brescia, Marlene Marie, Baltimore County 
Bridge, Brenda Blumenfeld, Baltimore City 
Brown, Deanna Jean, Anne Arundel County 
Brown, Donna Myers, Baltimore City 
Brown, Jeanne Stuart, Baltimore City 
Buccheri, Anthony Gabriel, Baltimore County 
BuDNY, Paul Ronald, Baltimore City 
Burke, Elizabeth Jean, Anne Arundel County 
Caldwell, Janet Shay, Baltimore County 
Calpin, Margaret Rose, Prince George's County 
Calvert, Andrew Herbert, Baltimore City 
Caplan, Beverly Ann, Baltimore City 
Cissel, Mary Alice, Queen Anne's County 
CoAKLEY, Carolyn Joanne, Washington County 
Cohan, Sally Lee, Baltimore City 
CouTRos, Peter George, Anne Arundel County 
Cox, Gertrude Forsythe, Baltimore City 
Crow, Sharon Ann, Baltimore County 
Cunningham, Verna Ann, Harford County 
Dahlman, Joyce Lynn, Baltimore City 
Dalinsky, Harriett Barbara, Baltimore City 



160 



D'Amario, Raymond Andrew, Baltimore City 

Dansereau, Anna Mae Rose, Baltimore City 

Dean, Norman Jack, Harford County 

DeVaughn, George Thomas, Jr., Baltimore County 

DoLLivER, Claire Vincent, Baltimore County 

Downey, Mary Patricia, Cecil County 

DowNHAM, Margaret Marie, Cecil County 

Dudderar, Nancy Elaine, Frederick County 

Eden, Walter Anthony, Baltimore County 

Eder, Rose Anne Mary, Baltimore County 

Eisner, Howard Daniel, Jr., Baltimore City 

Elam, Susan, Baltimore City 

Elam, Thomas Joseph, Baltimore City 

Elmore, John Franklin, Baltimore County 

Enfield, Margaret Lois, Harford County 

EsPEY, Audrey Peele, Baltimore County 

Evans, Elizabeth Radcliffe, Baltimore County 

Fallowfield, William Harris, Baltimore County 

Farrand, Freeland Palmer, Baltimore County 

Feinglass, Sue Ellen, Baltimore City 

Feldman, Henry Louis, Baltimore City 

Fenby, Catherine, Carroll County 

FiNDEisEN, Herbert Wilmer, Jr., Baltimore City 

Flaggs, Roselind Lee, Baltimore County 

Flickinger, Patricia Ann, Carroll County 

Floam, Lynn Pomerantz, Baltimore City 

Fraley, Eleanor Lee, Montgomery County 

Franks, Doris Jeanne Nicewonger, Baltimore County 

Friesland, James Max, Baltimore County 

Friesland, Penny June, Baltimore County 

Fritz, Justine Philmona, Baltimore County 

Gage, Mildred Louise Ledbetter, Baltimore City 

Gardiner, Ethel Marie, Anne Arundel County 

Garitee, Maria Zaetz, Baltimore County 

Garrity, Grace Delores, Baltimore County 

Gatley, Evelyn Elreane, Montgomery County 

Gehring, William Leonard, Baltimore County 

Gemignani, Shirley Pittman, Baltimore City 

Gilbert, Margaret Ann, Montgomery County 

GoLOB, Lois Dwartz, Baltimore City 

GoREN, Anne, Baltimore City 

Greenfeld, Anita Betty, Baltimore City 

Griest, Roger Dean, Baltimore County 

Griffith, Patricia Ruth, Montgomery County 

Gueydan, Joseph Francis, Baltimore County 

Haddaway, Carroll Wesley, Baltimore County 

Hall, Elaine Virginia, Worcester County 

Hallam, Janet Stuart, Baltimore County 

Hammond, William Lee, Baltimore County 



161 



Hanauer, Kenneth George, Baltimore City 

Hardt, Patricia Gail, Baltimore City 

Hawk, Sandra Lee, Carroll County 

Hawkins, Lura Artamicha, Frederick County 

Heard, Thomas McCardell, Washington County 

Hendrickson, Helen Sondra Louise, Cecil County 

Hertzbach, Barbara Turshinsky, Baltimore County 

Hewes, Robert James, Anne Arundel County 

Higgs, Daniel Gordon, Baltimore County 

Hill, Barbara Jean, Baltimore City 

HoFFACKER, WiLLiAM Franklin, Jr., Baltimore City 

HoLSTON, Elizabeth Taylor, Baltimore County 

HovERMALE, Nancy Lucille, Washington County 

HuMERiCK, Linda Ann, Frederick County 

Hunt, Clark Richard, Baltimore County 

HuRwiTz, Phyllis, Baltimore City 

Hux, Irene Marie, Baltimore County 

Hyson, Richard Thomas, Baltimore County 

Idzik, Marlene Frances, Baltimore County 

Ingram, Stephany Williams, Baltimore County 

IsENNOCK, Elaine Wisner, Baltimore County 

Janowski, Rosalie Jean, Baltimore City 

Jett, Margaret Ellen, Prince George's County 

Johnson, William Charles, Anne Arundel County 

Kahler, William James, Baltimore City 

Kane, Mary Jo, Harford County 

Katz, Israel Sherman, Baltimore City 

Kaufman, Dorothy Hill, Baltimore County 

Kaufman, Ethel Marie, Baltimore City 

Keller, Ruth Clare, Baltimore City 

Keplinger, Janet Lorraine, Washington County 

KiCAS, Mary Brookes, Baltimore County 

KiDD, Lois Sue, Baltimore County 

King, Myrna Lea, Baltimore County 

King, Sue Irene, Calvert County 

Klein, Robert, Baltimore County 

Kraeter, Jacquelyn Gayle, Baltimore County 

Kramer, Bette Ann, Baltimore County 

Kravetz, Sallie Mae, Baltimore County 

Krout, Edgar Wallace, Jr., Baltimore City 

Lane, Audrey Anne, Baltimore City 

Larwood, Sylvia Anne, Prince George's County 

Lasker, Barbara Eileen, Baltimore County 

League, Muriel Jane, Baltimore City 

Lee, Constance Carlson, Baltimore City 

Leon, Winifred Gail, Baltimore County 

LiNDSLEY, Carol Streib, Baltimore City 

Lister, Betty Louise, Baltimore County 

LiZER, Bonnie Sowers, Baltimore County 

Lord, Elizabeth Anne, Baltimore County 



162 



Loveless, Elizabeth Ann, Howard County 
LoziNSKY, Benito Shapiro, Baltimore City 
LuBMAN, Sylvia Carp, Baltimore City 
LvLE, Carolyn Ingalls, Prince George's County 
Lynch, Carolyn Elizabeth, Baltimore City 
Makinson, William Franklin, Howard County 
Malas, Spiro, Baltimore City 
Mallonee, Sara Gertrude, Baltimore City 
Malthan, Catherine, Baltimore City 
Manger, Evelyn Dolores, Baltimore City 
Marks, Barbara Ann, Baltimore City 
Marshall, Marie Huber, Baltimore City 
Martin, Phyllis Jo Ann, Washington County 
Masemore, Gerald Lee, Baltimore County 
Mauzy, Barbara Jean, Montgomery County 
McCleary, Juanita Mabel, Cecil County 
McCoMAS, Russell Laird, Harford County 
McDaniel, Patricia Ann, Baltimore County 
McMahon, Kathryn Riley, Baltimore County 
Mercer, Grace Eleanor, Carroll County 
Merenbloom, Elliot, Baltimore City 
Miller, Catharine Elizabeth, Carroll County 
Miller, Lois Mae, Baltimore City 
MiLLHAusER, Rachel Lee Millison, Baltimore County 
Minor, Alice Ann, Baltimore County 
MiNTz, Martin Barry, Baltimore City 
Mitchell, Jack Lawrence, Baltimore City 
MoFFET, Eileen Lois, Baltimore City 
MoTT, Charles Leroy, Baltimore City 
Myers, Richard Alexander, Jr., Baltimore City 
Nacman, Alvyn Irwin, Baltimore City 
Naumann, Janice Ruth, Baltimore County 
Neugent, Carole Elaine, Baltimore County 
Neussinger, Emilie Louise, Baltimore City 
Newkirk, Martha Jane, Washington County 
Norris, Betty Lee, Carroll County 
Pace, Donald Carl, Baltimore County 
Patrinicola, Paul Joseph, Baltimore County 
Penton, James Henry, IH, Carroll County 
Petterson, Shirley Greenwell, St. Mary's County 
PiACENTiNo, Charlotte Rutherford, Baltimore City 
Pitman, Constance Annette, Baltimore City 
Plaia, Jean, Montgomery County 
Plumhoff, Mary Ellen, Baltimore County 
Polonsky, Annette Lakein, Baltimore City 
Powers, Margaret Lyle Charlton, Baltimore City 
PreVatte, Margaret Raye, Baltimore County 
Pritchett, Janet Goodrich, Baltimore County 
Prucha, Maxine Frances, Baltimore City 



163 



PuNTE, Ruth Beach, Baltimore City 
Ragland, Ruth Robinette, Baltimore County 
Ray, Arline Kates, Baltimore County 
Reck, Donald, Carroll County 
Regan, Judith Evans, Baltimore County 
Reider, John Leroy, Baltimore County 
Rennie, Dorothy Fleetwood, Baltimore City 
Rexroad, Donna Lee, Frederick County 
RroDLESPURGER, Karla, Baltimore County 
Riley, Gerald Lee, Baltimore City 
Riley, Loretta Arlene, Baltimore County 
Robertson, Barbara Lea, Washington County 
Robertson, Gail Jacqueline, Baltimore County 
Robinson, Jean Audrey, Baltimore City 
Rose, Eileen Rae, Baltimore City 
RuDiE, Patricia Adrian, Baltimore City 
Samorodin, Joan Valya, Baltimore City 
Sanders, Rebecca Reisman, Baltimore City 
ScHALLER, NoLA Matthews, Baltimore County 
Scheffel, Betty Lee, Baltimore County 
Scherr, Judith, Baltimore City 
ScHOOLNiCK, Joan Selma, Baltimore City 
ScHUL, Milton Julian, Baltimore County 
Schumacher, Edward Carson, Baltimore County 
Schwartz, Barbara Sue, Baltimore City 
ScHwiER, Ruth Elaine, Baltimore City 
Shamberger, Barbara Lee, Baltimore County 
Shocket, Cecelia Dee, Baltimore County 
SiNSKY, Deborah Colton, Baltimore City 
Slayton, Nancy Reed, Carroll County 
Smith, Carol Louise, Washington County 
Smith, Frances Patricia, Baltimore City 
Smith, Gerald, Baltimore City 
Smith, Leila Mae, Baltimore City 
Smith, Regina Stack, Baltimore City 
Sparenberg, Patricia Adams, Baltimore City 
Sparrow, Jeanette Jacqueline, Baltimore City 
Speer, Judith Anne, Prince George's County 
Spriggs, Josephine Irene, Baltimore City 
Spurrier, Suzanne Ruth, Baltimore City 
Standiford, Joyce Elaine, Baltimore City 
Stefansson, David Ragnar, Baltimore City 
Sterner, Rose Marie Galeone, Baltimore City 
Stewart, William Jeremiah, Cecil County 
Stoker, Margie Ann, Montgomery County 
Strong, Barbara Jane, Baltimore County 
Stroud, Joan Baker, Stewartstown, Pa. 
Sudbrink, Donald Lewis, Baltimore County 
Suiter, Judith Hynds, Cobleskill, N. Y. 
SwEANY, Ronald Cole, Anne Arundel County 



164 



SwENSEN, HiLMA NoRGARD, Baltimore County 
SwiTHERS, Roberta Celeste, Baltimore County 
Taschenberg, Patricia Frances, Allegany County 
Taylor, Malcolm Samuel, Harford County 
Thomas, Shirley Mae, Howard County 
Thomasson, Patricia Susan, Montgomery County 
Thompson, Mary Ellen, Anne Arundel County 
TiLDON, Edward Victor, Baltimore City 
Trout, Marian Harris, Stewartstown, Pa. 
Truffer, Elynor May Jones, Anne Arundel County 
TsiRiGOTis, Anthoula, St. Mary's County 
TuLKOFF, Sylvia Grossman, Baltimore City 
Turner, Robert Edward, Baltimore County 
Turner, Virginia Mae, Baltimore City 
Usilton, Rosalie, Queen Anne's County 
Valdivia, Edith Eugenia, Baltimore County 
Vance, Mary Kathryn, Washington County 
Vernay, Patricia Humphrey, Howard County 
Vetter, Donald Palmer, Baltimore County 
vonBehren, Margaret Edith, Baltimore City 
Wade, Bobbie Yarborough, Washington County 
Waitsman, Beverly Marian, Baltimore City 
Walters, Ethel Patricia, Baltimore County 
Washkevich, Barbara Lee, Baltimore County 
Way, James Edward, Baltimore County 
Webb, Sara Venable, Baltimore City 
Weber, John Joseph, Baltimore City 
Wecker, Maxine Frida, Montgomery County 
Wedmore, Eileen Loretta, Baltimore City 
Wehner, Charles Stanley, Baltimore County 
Weiner, Stanley, Baltimore City 
Weinstein, Ray, Baltimore City 
White, Rose Anna, Baltimore City 
Whitfield, Mary Edith, Baltimore City 
Whitmore, Doris June, Baltimore County 
Williams, Lorraine Ann, Kent County 
Williams, Marilyn Hook, Baltimore City 
WiRTZ, Ruth Elizabeth, Baltimore County 
Woods, Alice Bondy, Baltimore County 
Wright, Cecil Jo, Cecil County 
Wyman, Rhoda Hofrichter, Baltimore City 
Wynne, Helen Theresa, Baltimore County 
Yanuk, Anna Kuchta, Baltimore City 
Yesenofski, Wallis, Baltimore City 
Zimmer, Ann Strasinger, Baltimore County 
Zimmerman, Elaine, Anne Arundel County 
Zimmerman, Marian, Anne Arundel County 
ZuBiN, Sandra Mae, Baltimore City 



165 



Bachelor of Science (Post-Baccalaureate) 

Devlin, Stella Anna, Baltimore City 

German, Marguerite Elaine Shryock, Baltimore County 

Insley, Elizabeth Wood, Baltimore County 

Peters, James Wilton, Baltimore County 

Junior College — June 12, 1960 
Associate in Arts 

Allen, Norris Elliott, Baltimore County 
Beachley, Albert Cobourn, Harford County 
Donohoe, Evelyn Anne, Baltimore City 
Frack, Elizabeth Clerk, Baltimore County 
Gliss, Mildred Nancy, Baltimore City 
Grimes, Jo Lane, Baltimore County 
Marshall, Anita Lou, Baltimore City 
Mayhan, Mari Jayne, Baltimore County 
Murray, Elizabeth Anne, Allegany County 
Oler, Raymond Wayne, Baltimore City 
Papillo, Jeanette Phylis, Baltimore County 
Robins, Marjorie Anne, Baltimore City 
ScHULZ, Carol Lee, Baltimore City 
Shalowitz, Frayda, Baltimore City 
Stallard, Robert Bruce, Baltimore County 
Sunderland, Lowell Eaton, Baltimore County 
Thompson, Elaine Lee, Baltimore City 
Wheeler, Marilyn Elizabeth, Baltimore County 



166 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS OF 1960 

President Peter George Coutros 

Vice President Judith Anne Speer 

Recording Secretary Mary Patricia Downey 

Corresponding Secretary Judith Scherr 

Treasurer Carolyn Joanne Coakley 



MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS 
ELECTED TO KAPPA DELTA PI 



Elizabeth Ehlers Behringer 
Frances Crandell Bouis 
Donna Myers Brown 
Mary Alice Cissel 
Margaret Marie Downham 
Penny June Friesland 
Mildred Louise Ledbetter Gage 
Ethel Marie Gardiner 
Evelyn Elreane Gatley 
Marguerite E. S. German 
Anita Betty Greenfeld 
Lura Artamicha Hawkins 
Elaine Wisner Isennock 
Mary Jo Kane 
Dorothy Hill Kaufman 
Sue Irene King 
Constance Carlson Lee 
Carol Streib Lindsley 
William Franklin Makinson 
Barbara Ann Marks 
Marie Huber Marshall 



Barbara Jean Mauzy 
Jack Lawrence Mitchell 
Janice Ruth Naumann 
Carole Elaine Neugent 
James Wilton Peters 
Mary Ellen Plumhoff 
Gerald Lee Riley 
Jean Audrey Robinson 
Patricia Adrian Rudie 
Milton Julian Schul 
Ruth Elaine Schwier 
Rose Marie Galeone Sterner 
HiLA Norgard Swensen 
Malcolm Samuel Taylor 
Ethel Patricia Walters 
Rose Anna White 
Marilyn Hook Williams 
Ruth Elizabeth Wirtz 
Alice Bondy Woods 
Ann Strasinger Zimmer 



Teachers College 
Teachers College 
Junior College 



Summary of Degrees 

Master of Education 
Bachelor of Science 
Associate in Arts 



June 1960 
June 1960 
June 1960 



4 

290 

18 



Enrollment Sum,mary 1959-60 

Men Women Total 

Teachers College 316 1059 1375 

Evening Classes 16 16 

Graduate Students 10 30 40 

Junior College 36 48 84 

Grand Total 362 1153 1515 



167 



GRADUATES 

Teachers College — June 11, 1961 
Master of Education Degrees 

BuNCE, Andrew Rowland, Baltimore County 
Chapple, Barbara Ann, Baltimore County 
DiPiETRo, Louis Pasquale, Baltimore County 
EiFERT, Jean Isabelle Travers, Baltimore County 
KoTULA, Bernard Charles, Baltimore County 
McClelland, Sally Tanttarri, Baltimore County 
Nacman, Joan Helen, Delaware 

Bachelor of Science Degrees 

Abrams, Beverly Ruth, Baltimore City 
Adams, Mary Ophelia, Baltimore City 
Allen, Melinda, Baltimore County 
Amland, Beverly Anne, Baltimore City 
Anastasi, Robert Edward, Montgomery County 
Anderson, Joyce Elizabeth, Baltimore City 
AsAY, Marian Elaine, Montgomery County 
AsKiN, Gloria Lois, Baltimore County 
Atwell, Kenneth Russell, Anne Arundel County 
AuDLEY, Mary Ann Cecilia, Arlington, Va. 
Bacon, Mary Ellen, Baltimore County 
Bagdadi, Phyllis Ann, Baltimore City 
Bainbridge, Jack Richard, Baltimore City 
Baker, Raymond Robert, Baltimore County 
Barger, Elizabeth Juelda, Washington County 
Bates, Charles Benjamin, Baltimore County 
Bees, Eleanor Birk, Baltimore County 
Benjamin, Evelyn Marie, Cecil County 
Bennett, Charles Theodore, Dorchester County 
Bevans, Elsie Beale, Baltimore County 
Bowling, Robert Pope III, Charles County 
Branch, Marta Lee, Baltimore City 
Brocato, Lucy Marie, Baltimore City 
Brooks, Charles Edward, Baltimore City 
Burkom, Selma Ruth, Baltimore City 
Burns, Ruth Schillinger, Harford County 
BuscH, Robert Pierce, Baltimore County 
Butchko, John, Jr., Baltimore County 
Butler, Irvina Ernest, Baltimore County 
Callary, Robert Edward, Harford County 
Caron, Mary Cecile, Harford County 
Carr, Ruth Eileen, Carroll County 
Carstens, Joseph William, Prince George's County 
Chenowith, Roberta Jean, Baltimore City 
Cherewko, Eugene, Talbot County 
Chiles, Linda Jane, Baltimore County 
Chiles, Susan Lynne, Baltimore County 



168 



Cohen, Rhoda Atkin, Baltimore City 
CoHN, Barbara Carole, Baltimore City 
Coleman, Charles Cline, Baltimore City 
Collector, Roberta Jacqueline, Baltimore County 
Conigliaro, John Joseph, Baltimore County 
Cook, Everett Lee, Harford County 
Copper, Linda Royahn, Baltimore County 
Cornett, Ruth Wampler, Carroll County 
Couchman, Sandra Jean, Washington County 
Cox, Mildred Olivia, Baltimore City 
Cox, Myrna Saundra, Baltimore City 
Cribbs, Patricia Kay, Baltimore County 
Cushner, Florette Miriam, Baltimore City 
Cyzyk, Donald Arthur, Baltimore County 
Danenburg, Saul Edward, Baltimore City 
Davidson, Carole Edna, Baltimore City 
Davis, Gorman Ray, Jr., Carroll County 
Dee, Stephanie Jankowski, Baltimore City 
Diering, Barbara Anne, Baltimore City 
DiNardo, Elizabeth Anndrianna, Baltimore City 
Doetsch, Mary Lou, Anne Arundel County 
DoLLENGER, Kenneth Franklin, Harford County 
DucziNSKi, Richard John, Baltimore City 
Eareckson, George Meginnis, Baltimore City 
Edgell, Lois Diane, Talbot County 
Edwards, John Sterling, Jr., Baltimore City 
Edwards, Marjorie Lee, Harford County 
Elliott, Mary Adeline, Baltimore County 
Ennis, Patricia Ann, Baltimore County 
Evans, Joseph Arthur, Howard County 
Evans, Richard Louis, Montgomery County 
Faasen, Marianne, Prince George's County 
Fasnacht, Jo Ann Tilford, Baltimore County 
Feehley, Marion Brown, Baltimore City 
Figelman, Heather Smith, Baltimore City 
Flickinger, Kenneth Robert, Baltimore County 
Ford, David John, Jr., Baltimore County 
Fox, Thomas Andrew, Baltimore City 
Frank, Frances Myra, Baltimore City 
French, Mary Frances, Baltimore County 
Furman, Harriet Selma, Baltimore City 
Gallagher, Margaret Parr, Baltimore County 
Gamerman, Geraldine Linda, Baltimore City 
Germer, Joan Lee, Baltimore City 
Ghormley, Robert Eugene, Baltimore County 
Gibson, Alice Busenius, Baltimore County 
GrvENS, Eleanor Messick, St. Mary's County 
Glaser, Janet May, Baltimore County 
Glenn, Rose Marie Warfield, Howard County 
Goodman, Phyllis, Baltimore City 
Granger, Patricia Ann, Baltimore City 
Graves, Mary Lee, Baltimore City 

169 



Gregory, Janet Mary, Howard County 
Griffin, Claire Velie, Baltimore County 
Grimes, Gladys Carpenter, Baltimore County 
Grisinger, Betty Jane, Baltimore City 
Gross, Linda Shor, Baltimore City 
Guzman, Susana JiJon, Baltimore County 
Haines, Robert Kent, Carroll County 
Haluch, Joseph Walter, Baltimore City 
Hanks, Anita Louise, Washington County 
Hanssen, Elsie Mary, Baltimore City 
Harman, Patricia Ann Henry, Baltimore City 
Harn, Gary Carlton, Baltimore City 
Harris, Susan Margaret, Tampa, Florida 
Harsh, Margaret Lucretia, Washington County 
Heine, Mildred Ann, Baltimore City 
Heyman, Harriet Meyerowitz, Baltimore City 
Hickmon, Suzanne Birch, St. Mary's County 
HiLDEBRAND, FRANCES Davis, Baltimore County 
Hill, Stella Maxine, Harford County 
HiNMAN, Harry Beemer III, Baltimore County 
Hoagland, Constance Henriette, Somerset County 
Holcombe, Chantal Ricci, Baltimore County 
HopwooD, Hugh Wayne, Baltimore City 
HoRVATH, Frances Litsch, Baltimore City 
Houston, Lynda Evelyn, Baltimore City 
HuGHLETT, Robert Emmett, Baltimore City 
Humphrey, Mary Louise, Baltimore City 
Iseminger, Judith Ann, Washington County 
Jakovics, Mara Severa, Baltimore County 
Johnson, Alexander Henry, Prince George's County 
Johnson, Barbara Dean, Baltimore City 
Jonas, Mary Brookhart, Baltimore County 
Jones, Melvadean Lorraine, Baltimore City 
Kahanowitz, Rosalie Frances, Baltimore City 
Kane, Edna Dawn, Baltimore City 
Karabell, Eileen Anita, Baltimore County 
Keehner, Marilyn Dorsch, Baltimore City 
Kelbaugh, John Harper, Jr., Anne Arundel County 
Kelley, Marguerita Fuchs, Anne Arundel County 
KiDD, Patricia Mae, Baltimore City 
Kingsbury, Sharron Kaye, Prince George's County 
Kirby, Virginia Itzel, Baltimore County 
KiRBY, William Harvey, Baltimore City 
KoHLER, Roseanne Jeannette, Baltimore County 
KoRALLUs, Lillian Haltermann, Baltimore County 
Krieger, Phyllis Lea, Baltimore County 
Lane, Darrell Tynan, Prince George's County 
Lane, Patrick Joseph, Baltimore County 
Langbehn, Eugene Ward, Baltimore County 
Laniewski, Barbara Mary, Baltimore City 
Leddon, Jack William, Baltimore City 



170 



Legum, Ina Carole Luchinsky, Baltimore City 
Levin, Lynn Dubin, Baltimore City 
Levin, Phyllis Maloff, Baltimore City 
Levitt, Burton, Baltimore City 
LEVY;, Gail Kahanowitz, Baltimore City 
Lewis, Diana Rita, Baltimore City 
Lewis, Dorothy May, Baltimore City 
Leyes, Mary Susan, Montgomery County 
LiCHSTRAHL, Marilyn Estelle, Baltimore City 
Leiske, George Spencer, Baltimore City 
LiNDGREN, Sandra, Baltimore City 
Loberstein, Sylvia Fine, Baltimore County 
Lorenz, Edward Beckley, Baltimore County 
Lyter, Gabrielle Catherine, Baltimore County 
Machin, Polly Pat, Baltimore City 
Madison, Luta Marguerite, Anne Arundel County 
Marlowe, Marjorie Dietz, Baltimore City 
Maskol, Jan Stephen, Baltimore County 
Mason, Barbara Lee, Harford County 
Masters, Patsy Ola, Washington County 
Mathews, William Howard, Jr., Baltimore City 
McCloskey, Neal Comer, Baltimore City 
McDowell, Barbara Neville, Montgomery County 
McLaughlin, Carole Ellen, Baltimore City 
McLeod, Maudestine Alberta, Baltimore City 
Merriken, Doris Jean, Baltimore County 
Mikanowicz, Josephine Ann, Baltimore City 
Miller, Betty Lou, Anne Arundel County 
Miller, James Rush, Anne Arundel County 
Milstead, Don Burnell, Charles County 
Mitchell, Margaret Mary, Anne Arundel County 
Morris, Rhoda, Baltimore County 
MuiR, Rosalie Louise, Baltimore City 
MuNAKER, Susan Phyllis, Baltimore City 
Naumann, Lenore Suchanek, Baltimore City 
Needle, Harriett Abigail, Baltimore City 
Neumeister, Ann Kaiser, Baltimore County 
Neville, Ellen Rebekah Webster, Frederick County 
Newman, Evelyn Roberta, Baltimore City 
NiTZBERG, Harriet Ellen, Baltimore City 
NoLLEY, Eleanor Hood, Baltimore City 
O'Dell, Susan, Baltimore County 
O'Rourke, Mary Margaret, Baltimore City 
Owens, Janet Carole, Baltimore City 
OwiNGS, Mary Elizabeth Corroum, Baltimore County 
Parr, Patricia Alice, Baltimore County 
Peebles, Judith Atticks, Prince George's County 
Peeling, Wanda Leota, Carroll County 
Pensel, Judith Lynn, Talbot County 
Perrot, Mary Ann, Baltimore County 
Phillips, Dorothy Evelyn, Montgomery County 
Phillips, Louise Vigneras, Baltimore County 

171 



Phillips, Samuel Palmer, Baltimore County 
Pickett, Judith Elaine, Prince George's County 
PiCKUs, Ilene Lois, Baltimore City 
Plotkin, Joyce Zeskind, Baltimore County 
Poole, Susan Rice, Montgomery County 
PuLKKA, Phyllis Elaine, Baltimore County 
Quensen, Carol B., Baltimore City 
QuiNN, John Patrick, Baltimore County 
Rakes, Bonita, Baltimore County 
Reid, Mary Virginia Goode, Baltimore City 
Reuschling, Kathryn Wett, Baltimore City 
Rheb, Regis Hyland, Baltimore City 
Rhodes, Helen Jane, Washington County 
Richardson, Patricia Ann, Baltimore County 
Richardson, Randall Lee, Baltimore County 
Riddle, Ann Lee, Worcester County 
Rivers, Clair, Baltimore City 
Rose, John Aloysius, Jr., Baltimore City 
Ross, Janice Constance Levitt, Baltimore City 
RowE, Margaret Knobel, Howard County 
RowE, John Michael, Howard County 
Rowlands, Jean Walters, Baltimore County 
Ryan, Patrick Joseph, Baltimore City 
Sachs, Ellen Lois, Baltimore City 
Saulsbury, Milton Foster, Talbot County 
Schaefer, Janet Carol, Baltimore City 
Scheidt, Grace Carolyn, San Antonio, Texas 
ScHiERHOLZ, Margaret Mary, Frederick County 
ScHLEE, John William, Baltimore City 
Schwartz, Judith May, Baltimore City 
Scott, Mary Smith, Frederick County 
Seidler, Leah Gaponoff, Baltimore City 
Sher, Debra Ruth, Baltimore City 
Sherrer, Gaynelle Brenda, Baltimore City 
Sherrill, Barbara Louise, Montgomery County 
Sherwood, Andrea Brose, Baltimore City 
Shoemaker, Florence Trimble, Baltimore County 
Shortall, Timothy Bailey, Queen Anne's County 
Shortt, Germaine Louise, Baltimore City 
Silver, Vella Wolfe, Baltimore City 
Sims, Anne Theodore Fitzgerald, Baltimore City 
Smires, Jeannette Alyce, Baltimore County 
Smith, Barbara Anne, Baltimore City 
Smith, Francis Barry, Baltimore County 
Smith, Martha Ellen, Prince George's County 
Sollers, Duvall Goodwin, Baltimore City 
Somers, Richard Brent, Baltimore City 
Spade, Marilynn Kifer, Frederick County 
Sparks, James Lincoln, Baltimore City 
Stairs, Marian Alberta, Montgomery County 
Stavros, Diane Metaxas, Baltimore City 
Stepp, Doris Fern, Baltimore City 

172 



Stockman, David Edward, Baltimore County 
Storm, Eloise Trice, Montgomery County 
Streeks, Nancy Lee, Baltimore City 
Strosnider, Patricia Anne, Frederick County 
Swan, Sandra May, Montgomery County 
Sweet, Donna Watson, Baltimore City 
Tait, Barbara Mae, Montgomery County 
Tate, Carolyn Sandra, Baltimore City 
TaxI^or, Marcia, Baltimore City 
Taylor, Patsy Carol, Baltimore County 
Thomas, Nancy Anne, Baltimore County 
Todd, Marguerite, Baltimore City 
Trimble, Charileen Krause, Baltimore County 
Venable, Barbara Robbins, Baltimore County 
Warren, Katherine Lawrence, Charles County 
Weaver, Nancy Mayfield, Baltimore County 
Weigle, Beulah White, Baltimore County 
Weinblatt, Lenore, Baltimore City 
Weinstock, Sheldon David, Baltimore City 
Wells, Maurice Arnold, Baltimore City 
Wellslager, Mildred Roberts, Baltimore County 
Wentz, Sandra Lee, Baltimore City 
Whited, Barbara Bell, Washington County 
WiCKWiRE, Mary Ann, Baltimore County 
WiDENER, Katherine Stuart, Baltimore City 
Wilhelm, Madelon Catherine, Baltimore County 
Williams, Alan Douglas, Washington County 
Williams, Grace Foster, Baltimore County 
Williams, Janet Via, Baltimore County 
Willis, Elaine Ruth, Talbot County 
WiMMER, Ida May, Harford County 
WoLFKiLL, Charles Neil, Baltimore County 
Yox, Dorothy Miles, Baltimore County 

Bachelor of Science (Post-Baccalaureate) 

McBee, Billie Rittase, Baltimore City 
WiLMORE, Margery Montgomery, Baltimore City 

Junior College — June 11, 1961 

Associate in Arts 

Bejvan, Catherine Susan, Baltimore City 
Eyster, Lynn Elizabeth, Baltimore County 
Harrison, Linda Carol, Baltimore County 
Heun, Theodore August, Baltimore County 
Highsmith, Robert James, Baltimore County 
Kahn, Edythe Karlinsky, Baltimore County 
Lemen, Martha Dale, Baltimore County 
Medley, Carole Elizabeth, Baltimore City 
Mills, Joseph Leo, Baltimore City 
Passamonte, John Richard, Baltimore County 
Reed, Carole Ann, Baltimore City 
Smoller, Lonna Bea, Baltimore City 
Wallace, Roy, Baltimore City 

173 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS OF 1961 

President Richard Louis Evans 

Vice President George Thurman Sparks, Jr. 

Recording Secretary Lois Diane Edgell 

Corresponding Secretary Barbara Lee Mason 

Treasurer Janet Carol Schaefer 

MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS 
ELECTED TO KAPPA DELTA PI 



Beverly Ruth Abrams 
Elizabeth Juelda Barger 
Selma Ruth Burkom 
Ruth Wampler Cornett 
Linda Royahn Copper 
Richard Louis Evans 
Marian Brown Feehley 
Geraldine Linda Gamerman 
Robert Eugene Ghormley 
Claire Velie Griffin 
Susan Margaret Harris 
Stella Maxine Hill 
Lynda Evelyn Houston 



Mary Louise Humphrey 
Diana Rita Lewis 
Doris Jean Merriken 
Margaret Mary Mitchell 
Patricia Alice Parr 
BoNiTA Rakes 
Clair Rivers 

Janice Constance Levitt Ross 
Patrick Joseph Ryan 
Ellen Lois Sachs 
Grace Carolyn Scheidt 
Barbara Anne Smith 
Madelon Catherine Wilhelm 



Teachers College 
Teachers College 
Junior College 



Summary of Degrees 

Master of Education 
Bachelor of Science 
Associate in Arts 



June 1961 
June 1961 
June 1961 



7 

279 

13 



Enrollment Summary 1960-61 

Men Women Total 

Teachers College 336 1169 1505 

Evening Classes 6 15 21 

Graduate Students 9 22 31 

Junior College 30 53 83 

Grand Total 381 1259 1640 

TOTAL NUMBER OF GRADUATES 

SINCE 1866 . 9,970 



174 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the 

State Teachers College at Towson, Inc. 

1960 - 1961 

President 
QuiNTON D. Thompson McDonogh School, McDonogh, Md. 

Firs t Vice-Pres ident 
Samuel Sharrow 724 Cloudyfold Drive, Baltimore 8, Md. 

Second Vice-President 
L. Raymond Townsend 51 Oakway Road, Timonium, Md. 

Third Vice-President 
Carroll Wagner 7124 Greenwood Avenue, Baltimore 6, Md. 

Treasurer 
John Hilker 2629 Berwick Avenue, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Secretary 
Dorothy Rybka 1729 Lancaster Street, Baltimore 31, Md. 

Executive Secretary 
Mrs. Beverly Crook Phoenix, Md. 

Board of Directors 

Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, ex officio, 

State Teachers College at Towson, Baltimore 4, Md. 

Harold Katz 708 Leafydale Terrace, Baltimore 8, Md. 

Mrs. Iva Jenkins Lutz 4403 Walther Boulevard, Baltimore 14, Md. 

James J. Sarnecki 2414 Fleet Street, Baltimore 24, Md. 

Mrs. Nancy Hovermale Welsh, 

312 Garden Road, Baltimore 4, Md. 

Dr. M. Theresa Wiedefeld, 

5403 Tramore Road, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Susan Chiles . State Teachers College at Towson, Baltimore 4, Md. 
Senior Class Representative 



175 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the 

State Teachers College at Towson, Inc. 

1961 - 1962 

President 
QuiNTON D. Thompson McDonogh School, McDonogh, Md. 

First Vice-President 
Samuel Sharrow 724 Cloudyfold Drive, Baltimore 8, Md. 

Second Vice-President 
L. Raymond Townsend 51 Oakway Road, Timonium, Md. 

Third Vice-President 
Carroll Wagner 7124 Greenwood Avenue, Baltimore 6, Md. 

Treasurer 
John Hilker 2629 Berwick Avenue, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Assistant Treasurer 
Mrs. Rosalie D. Wells. 5430 Gardenwood Road, Baltimore 6, Md. 

Secretary 

Charlotte Fishman 5311 Fairlawn Avenue, Baltimore 15, Md. 

Assistant Secretary 
Patricia Pieper 3002 Rueckert Avenue, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Executive Secretary 
Mrs. Beverly Crook Phoenix, Md. 

Board of Directors 

Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, ex officio, 

State Teachers College at Towson, Baltimore 4, Md. 

Susan Chiles 3610 Latham Road, Baltimore 7, Md. 

E. Heighe Hill. 6902 Petworth Avenue, Baltimore 12, Md. 

Harold Katz 708 Leafydale Terrace, Baltimore 8, Md. 

Dr. M. Theresa Wiedefeld, 

5403 Tramore Road, Baltimore 14, Md. 

Norris Weis 3609 Alameda Circle, Baltimore 18, Md. 

Gloria Galuppi 716 Anneslie Road, Baltimore 12, Md. 

Senior Class Representative 



176 



INDEX 



Academic program, 35-51 
Academic regulations, 52-56 
Accident insurance, 22 
Accreditation, 7-8 
Administrative Officers, 139 
Admission 

to advanced standing, 16, 78, 
89, 128 

to block of professional 
courses, 67, 68, 69 

to graduate program, 132 

to Arts and Sciences, 16 

of liberal arts graduates, 17 

of special students, 17 

to student teaching, 55 

to Teacher Education, 13-15 

of transfer students, 16-17, 52 
Advisory program, 27-29, 134 
Alumni Association, 175-176 
Application fee and advance 

payments, 15, 16, 20 
Areas of concentration, 35, 36, 
42, 44, 46, 93, 101, 102, 103 
Art department, 59-63 
Arts and Sciences 

admission, 16 

degree requirements, 35-36 

expenses, 18-21 

objectives, 8-9 

program, 47-51 

transfer, 16-17, 51, 54 
Athletic Associations, 33 
Attendance, 36, 55 
Auditing courses, 52 
Automobile regulations, 27 
Awards and Honors, 34, 167, 174 
Bachelor of Arts, 35-36, 89 
Bachelor of Science 

conferred 1960, 1961, 160-167, 
168-173, 174 

requirements for, 35, 36 
Buildings, 9-11 
Calendar, 5-6 



Campus, 9-12 

Career preparation, 39, 47-51 

Certification, 39 

Change of course or 

schedule, 52-53 
Classification of students, 53 
Clubs and organizations, 29-34 
Cooperating teachers, 152-159 
Counseling, 27-28 
Courses of instruction 

non-departmental, 58 

numbering of, 57 

offerings by 

department, 58-131 

required courses, 37, 38, 40 

sequence of courses, 40-46 

time of offering, 57 
Curricular sequences 

Arts and Sciences, 47 

Elementary, 43-44 

Kindergarten-Primary, 41-42 

Secondary, 45-46 

Preprofessional, 50-51 
Degrees, requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts, 35-36, 89 

Bachelor of Science, 35-36 

Master of Education, 133 
Degrees conferred, 1960, 

1961, 160-174 
Departments and Divisions 

Art, 59-63 

Education, 64-77, 111-114 

English, 68-83, 128-131 

Health, 84 

Mathematics, 85-88 

Modern Languages, 89-92 

Music, 93-96 

Physical Education, 84, 97-100 

Psychology, 111-114 

Science, 101-110 

Social Science, 115-127 

Speech, 128-131 

Dining facilities, 1 1 
Dramatic organization, 32, 34 



177 



INDEX (continued) 



Education department, 64-77, 

111-114 
Employment, Student, 28-29 
English department, 68-83, 

128-131 
Enrollment, 167, 174 
Expenses, 18-21, 22 
Facilities, 11-12 
Faculty and staff, 139-151 
Fees, 18-20, 22, 52, 93, 133-134 
Financial aid for students, 24-27, 

28-29 
Future development of 

college, 12 
Glen, The, 12 
Grading system, 53-54 
Graduate program, 7, 39, 132-138 
Graduates 

June 1960, 160-167 

June 1961, 168-174 
Health Center, 11-12 
Health Education division, 84 
Health service, 11-12, 22-23 
History of college, 7 
Honor societies, 34 
Housing and boarding, 11, 18, 

23-24 
Liability for unpaid 

tuition, 21, 56 
Library, 9-10, 11 
Lida Lee Tall School 

building, 10 

calendar, 6 

faculty and staff, 139-149, 151 

health services, 23 
Loan funds, 25-27 
Mailing facilities, 12 
Majors, 35, 36, 47, 48, 59, 65, 
67, 78, 84, 85, 97, 101-102, 
103, 115-116, 128 
Master of Education, 132-138 
Mathematics department, 85-88 



Minors, 35, 78, 85, 111, 115-116, 

128 
Modern Language 

department, 89-92 
Music department, 93-96 

Music organizations, 31-32, 

94,95 
Non-departmental courses, 58 
Objectives, 8-10 
Off-campus students, 20, 21 
Organizations and clubs, 29-34 
Orientation courses, 58 
Out-of-State students, 18 
Part-time and summer 

students, 17 
Payment of fees, 18-21 
Peabody Conservatory of 

Music, 9, 93 
Physical Education 

department, 84, 97-100 
Placement, 28, 39 
Pledge to teach, 8, 15 
Post Office, 12 

Preprofessional patterns, 50-51 
Psychology division, 111-114 
Publications, student, 33-34 
Refunds, 21 
Registration, 27, 52 
Religious organizations, 31 
Required Courses, 37-38, 40 
Residence halls 

activities, 24, 30 

names, 10-11 

policies, 21, 23-24, 30 
Resident students 

costs and deposits, 18-21, 22 

housing and boarding, 11, 18, 
23-24 

room furnishing, 24 
Scholarships and loans, 24-27 
Science department, 101-110 
Selective Service, 29 



178 



INDEX (continued) 



Service organizations, 30-31 
Social Science 

department, 115-127 
Speech division, 128-131 

Speech requirement, 14, 36, 
54-55, 128 

Standards of academic 
work, 54-55 

State Board of Education, 139 
Student Centre, 1 1, 30 
Student government 
organizations, 29-30 



Student life program, 22-34 

Student load, 52 

Summer and special students, 17 

Traffic regulations, 27 

Transcripts, 56 

Transfer students, 16-17,40, 

47-52, 54 
Transportation fee, 19-20 
Tuition, 18 
Veteran students, 29 
Vocational guidance, 27-28 
Withdrawals, 21, 56 



179 



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STATE 







Bulletin of the State Teachers College at Towson 




Bulletin of the 



STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT TOWSON 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 




ALBERT S. COOK LIBRARY 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT TOWSOH 

miif^ORE 4, .MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE EDITION 1963-1964 



Ninety-eighth Year Begins September. 1963 
1963. Number 1 



CORRESPONDENCE 

The mailing address 

State Teachers College at Towson 
Baltimore 4, Maryland 

The telephone nmnber 

823-7500 

Switchboard open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily except 

9 a.m. to 12 Saturday and closed on 

Sunday 

Specific correspondence should be addressed as follows: 

ADMISSION MATTERS Director of Admissions 

BUSINESS MATTERS Business Manager 

CURRICULUM AND 

INSTRUCTION Dean of Instruction 

GENERAL MATTERS President 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS Director of Residence 

SCHOLARSHIPS Dean of Students 

SUMMER SESSION Director of Teacher Education 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORD Registrar 



BULLETIN OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT TOWSON 

is published five times a year by the State Teachers College at Towson, 
Baltimore 4, Maryland. Issued in February, March, April, August, October. 
Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Baltimore, 
Maryland. New Series 1963. Vol. 1, No. 1. 

JANUARY, 1963 



CALENDAR FOR 1963-64 ACADEMIC YEAR 



1963 

June 22, Saturday 



June 24j Monday 
July 4, Thursday 
August 2, Friday 



Summer Session 

Registration for the 6-week undergraduate 
and graduate term, and for residence, 
9 a.m. to 12 noon 

Classes begin 

Independence Day — No classes 

End of Summer Session 

Residence Halls close, 5 p.m. 



1963 

September 8, Sunday 

September 9-11 

September 10, Tuesday 

September 11, Wednesday 
September 12, Thursday 
September 16, 17 

September 20, Friday 
October 11, Friday 

October 17, 18, 19 

November 1 2, Tuesday 
November 22, 25, 26, 27 
November 27, Wednesday 

December 1, Sunday 
December 2, Monday 
December 2, 3, 4, 5 
December 6, 9, 10, 11, 12 
December 13, 16, 17, 
18, 19 
December 20, Friday 



First Semester 

Residence Halls open for new students, 

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
Orientation and registration for new 

students 
Residence Halls open for returning stu- 
dents, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
Registration for upperclassmen 
Classes begin at 8 a.m. 
Days when necessaiy schedule changes 

are to be made 
Last day for making schedule change 
Last day for dropping a course without 

receiving a grade of pass or fail 
Maryland State Teachers Association 

Convention 
Midsemester evaluation of students 
Pre-registration for seniors 
Thanksgiving holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

Residence Halls close, 3 p.m. 
Residence Halls open, 3 p.m. 
Classes resimie 
Pre-registration for juniors 
Pre-registration for sophomores 

Pre-registration for freshmen 
Christmas holiday begins, 2 p.m. 
Residence Halls close, 3 p.m. 



1964 

January 5, Sunday 
January 6, Monday 
January 20, Monday 
January 21, Tuesday 
January 28, Tuesday 



February 3, Monday 



February 4, Tuesday 

February 5, Wednesday 
February 6, Thursday 
Februray 10, 11 

Februar}^ 14, Friday 
March 6, Friday 

March 26, Thursday 

April 5, Sunday 
April 6, Monday 
April 14, Tuesday 
April 13, 14, 15, 16 
April 17, 20, 21, 22 
April 23, 24, 27, 28, 29 
June 1, Monday 
June 2, Tuesday 
June 9, Tuesday 
June 14, Sunday 



Residence Halls open, 3 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Reading Day prior to final examinations 

First Semester Examinations begin 

First Semester ends, 6 p.m. 

Second Semester 

Residence Halls open for new students, 
9 a.m. to 11 a.m. New students report 
for orientation and registration 

Residence Halls open for returning stu- 
dents, 1 p.m. 

Registration for returning Students 

Classes begin, 8 p.m. 

Days when necessary schedule changes 
may be made 

Last day for making schedule change 

Last day for dropping a course without 
receiving a grade of pass or fail 

Easter Holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

Residence Halls close, 3 p.m. 

Residence Halls open, 3 p.m. 

Classes restmie, 8 a.m. 

Mid-Semester Evaluation of Students 

Pre-registration for 1964-65 for juniors 

Pre-registration for sophomores 

Pre-registration for freshmen 

Reading day prior to final examinations 

Final examinations begin 

Second semester ends, 6 p.m. 

Commencement 

Residence Halls close, 6 p.m. 



1964 

June 13, Saturday 



June 27, Saturday 



Simmier Session 

Registration for the 2-week under 
graduate term, June 15 to 26, and the 
8-week undergraduate term, June 15 
to August 7, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 

Registration for the 6-week undergraduate 
and graduate term, and for residence, 
9 a.m. to 12 noon 

Registration for Residence Halls, 9 a.m. 
to 12 noon. 



June 29, Monday 
August 7, Friday- 



Classes begin 

End of summer session 

Residence Halls close, 5 p.m. 



LIDA LEE TALL SCHOOL 

1963 

September 4, Wednesday School opens 

November 27, Wednesday Thanksgiving holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

December 2, Monday Classes resume 

December 20, Friday Christmas holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

1964 

January 6, Monday 
March 26, Thursday 
April 6, Monday 
June 10, Wednesday 



Classes resume 

Easter holiday begins, 2 p.m. 

Classes resume 

School closes 



CONTENTS 

Calendar for 1963-64 5 

THE COLLEGE 9 

History 9 

Accreditation and State Support 9 

Objectives 10 

Campus and Building 11 

Facilities 13 

Future Development 14 

ADMISSIONS 15 

The Teacher Education Program 15 

The Arts and Sciences Program 18 

Summer Session, Part-Time and Graduate Programs 19 

EXPENSES 20 

STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 25 

Health Service 25 

Residence Halls 26 

Financial Aid 27 

Veterans; Selective Service 32 

Student Organizations and Activities 32 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 38 

THE COLLEGE CURRICULA 45 

GENERAL COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 48 

THE PROGRAM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 62 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 68 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 150 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 159 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 159 

FACULTY AND STAFF, 1962-63 159 

COOPERATING TEACHERS, 1962-63 172 

GRADUATES, 1962 177 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 1962-63 185 

INDEX 186 

ANNOUNCEMENT Inside back cover 

8 



THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY 

The State Teachers College at Towson, Maryland's oldest and 
largest teacher education institution, traces its history back to 1865, 
when the General Assembly of Maryland first established a State- 
wide public school system. A chapter of the law authorized the 
founding of the State's first Normal School which was formally 
opened in Baltimore on January 15, 1866. 

For many years it was the only institution devoted exclusively 
to the preparation of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 
Prior to 1900 the Head of the Normal School was, ex officio, the 
State Superintendent of Education, and the Normal School was the 
headquarters for the State Board of Education. 

The school had three locations in Baltimore City, the best re- 
membered being the Romanesque building on Lafayette Square erected 
in 1876 and occupied until 1915, when the institution moved to its 
present suburban location in Towson. 

For the first sixty-five years of its history the school offered a 
two-year course for the preparation of elementary school teachers 
for Maryland. In 1931 the course of study was extended to three 
years and in 1934 to four years. 

In 1935 the General Assembly authorized the institution to 
grant the Bachelor's degree and to change its name to the State 
Teachers College at Towson. 

Until 1946 the college confined itself to the single purpose of 
educating teachers for the elementary schools. In that year a two- 
year junior college program in the arts and sciences was added. 

In 1947 the college enlarged its offerings to include the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the junior high school and in 1949 the prepara- 
tion of teachers for the kindergarten-primary grades. 

In 1958 a graduate program for elementary teachers leading to 
the degree Master of Education was inaugurated. 

In 1960 the college extended its offerings in teacher education 
to include the preparation of teachers for the senior high school. 
The former two-year junior college program was extended, by action 
of the State Board of Education, to a four-year program in the arts 
and sciences leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bache- 
lor of Arts. 

ACCREDITATION AND STATE SUPPORT 

The College is accredited by the Maryland State Board of 
Education, the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 

9 



Schools and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. It is a member of the American Council on Education 
and is approved by the American Association of University Women. 

The College is an integral part of the system of public educa- 
tion in the State of Maryland. It is governed by the State Board of 
Education and is supported almost entirely by legislative appropria- 
tions. No tuition is charged Maryland residents for the teacher- 
education program. In lieu of tuition payments, students from 
Maryland pledge themselves to teach two years in the public schools 
of the State upon graduation. Students in the program of arts and 
science pay tuition. All students pay a curriculum fee. 

OBJECTIVES 

OBJECTIVES OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The central purpose of this program is to prepare the best 
possible teachers for the public schools of Maryland. To this end, 
the educational offerings comprise a careful blend of cultural and 
professional courses. The aim is to provide a broad cultural back- 
ground, professional knowledge and skills, and a philosophy of 
education. In fulfillment of this purpose, the faculty strives to help 
the student to: 

1. Understand the values of democracy and accept its respon- 
sibilities. 

2. Live by ethical principles and respect spiritual values. 

3. Acquire facts, develop understandings, skills, and appro- 
priate attitudes in the various academic areas. 

4. Understand and use the general and special methods of 
inquiry of all the major disciplines. 

5. Learn and apply the contributions of the past, of all races, 
and other cultures. 

6. Increase understanding of self and of human development. 

7. Know the materials of learning and the procedures for 
planning experiences to meet the needs of learners. 

8. Apply in teaching the principles that govern the learning 
process. 

9. Evaluate and record individual strengths and needs of 
learners. 

10. Organize time and daily living to foster physical and 
mental health. 

11. Begin a life-long pursuit of knowledge. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAM 

The objectives of the teacher education program, except for 
those which relate specifically to professional education, apply also 
to the program in arts and sciences. This program, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts, comprises a four- 

10 



year sequence of offerings for students who wish a general college 
education or who are preparing to enter one of the professions that 
require undergraduate education as a prerequisite. 

The program provides opportunities to major in Art, EngUsh, 
Speech and Dramatics, Mathematics, Physical Education, Biology, 
Geography, or History. Pre-professional programs are available for 
Engineering, Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Forestry, Nursing, 
and Medical Technology. 

CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS 

In 1915 the college moved to its present site in the southern 
part of Towson on York Road eight miles from the center of Balti- 
more City and a mile and a half beyond the city's northern bound- 
ary line. The campus of more than one hundred acres is one of the 
most beautiful in this part of the country. It offers opportunities 
for healthful outdoor recreation and for coordinating classroom 
instruction with field study. 

The college is near enough to Baltimore for students to share 
in the cultural advantages that the city offers. 

Within a five -mile radius of the campus are Goucher College, 
Johns Hopkins University, Loyola College, Morgan State College, 
College of Notre Dame, Mt. St. Agnes College, and the Baltimore 
Museum of Art. The Walters Art Gallery, the Peabody Conservatory 
of Music and Library, and the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Balti- 
more are also accessible to students. The city affords many oppor- 
tunities to attend opera, concerts, and the theatre. 

Although the institution is almost one hundred years old, 
it has occupied its present campus only slightly more than forty-five 
years. All buildings are thus of modem fire-resisting construction 
and have been erected in line with a definite plan of campus 
development. 

Stephens Hall (the administration building), named for M. 
Bates Stephens, State Superintendent of Education from 1900 to 
1920, dominates the campus group and sets the pattern of Jacobean 
architecture characteristic of all the buildings on the front campus. 
It contains administrative offices, classrooms and laboratories, and 
the auditorium. 

The Albert S. Cook Library, completed in 1957, is named for 
Albert S. Cook, State Superintendent of Schools from 1920 to 1941. 
Of modem architecture and functional design, this air-conditioned 
building has a book capacity of 100,000 volumes and a seating 
capacity of 450. In addition to stack areas and general reading 
rooms, it contains a periodical room, a seminar room, a micro-film 
and micro-card room, a phonograph record listening room, a lecture 
room, a teaching materials center, and several typing alcoves. 

Van Bokkelen Hall was erected in 1931 and was used for a 

11 



number of years as the campus elementary school. It was completely 
remodeled and renovated in 1961 and renamed for Libertus Van 
Bokkelen, Maryland's first Superintendent of Public Instruction, from 
1865 to 1868. It serves as a classroom building for the departments 
of art, mathematics, speech, and instrumental music. Here too are 
recording and listening rooms for the speech department, piano 
practice rooms for the music department, and display areas for the 
art department. 

The Lida Lee Tall School, named for Lida Lee Tall, president 
of the college from 1920 to 1938, is the campus laboratory school. 
It includes a kindergarten and six grades of elementary school with two 
rooms for each grade. In addition to classrooms the building in- 
cludes offices, conference rooms, a health suite, a library, an art 
room, a music room, a science room with greenhouse, a cafeteria, 
an assembly room, and storage rooms. Erected in 1960, the building 
is of modem functional design and represents the best thinking in 
elementary school planning. 

Wiedefeld Gymnasium is named for M. Theresa Wiedefeld, 
president of the college from 1938 to 1947, during whose adminis- 
tration it was erected. The building includes a large playing floor, 
spectator's balcony, offices, special rooms for individual physical 
education work, and showers, locker and dressing room facilities. 

Newell Hall, named for McFadden Alexander Newell, the 
founder and first principal of the institution, is one of the three 
residence halls for women. In this hall are the offices of the resident 
director and the dietitian, a large foyer, a television room, a con- 
ference room, a guest room, service rooms for students, and study 
and committee rooms. Students' rooms on the first and second floors 
are arranged in suites of two rooms with bath. Each room accom- 
modates two or three students. The third floor has the usual ar- 
rangement of rooms and group baths. 

Richmond Hall, named for a former principal of the school, 
Sarah E. Richmond, adjoins Newell Hall. This building is occu- 
pied by freshmen women and some members of the Freshmen Ad- 
visory Council. Most of the rooms accommodate two students. 
There are a few single rooms and a sleeping porch with adjoining 
dressing and study rooms. On the first floor is a large attractive 
lounge which is used for formal social affairs. 

Prettyman Hall, named for E. Barrett Prettyman, principal of 
the school from 1890 to 1905, is the newest women's residence hall. 
Most of its rooms accommodate two students, but there are a few 
single rooms and several larger rooms for three students. The build- 
ing contains a large lounge, several smaller lounges and study 
rooms, a recreation room, students' service rooms, and quarters for 
the resident director and resident supervisors. 

George W. Ward Hall and Henry S. West Hall are two iden- 
tical residence halls for men, named for former principals of the 

12 



school. Each contains a lounge with connecting kitchen, recreation 
room, and office and apartment for the resident supervisor. Rooms 
for students are modem in design and equipped with built-in 
facilities. 

The Dowell Health Center, constructed in 1962, is named for 
Anita S. Dowell, first Dean of the College and Chairman for a 
nimiber of years of the Department of Health. The building con- 
tains on the lower level a foyer and waiting room, offices for the 
physician, living quarters for a nurse, examination rooms and a 
physio-therapy room. On the upper level are 19 beds, separated into 
men's and women's pavilions, each with private baths. The level 
is provided with an exit designed particularly for ambulance service. 

East Hall (a converted adjacent residence) is used to house 
visiting athletic teams. 

The Service Building includes the heating plant, engineers' 
offices, and the laundry. The top floor of this building is used as 
an auxiliary gymnasiimi. 

Glen Esk, the President's home, is located on the northern part 
of the campus. The large house is surrounded by some rare trees 
planted years before the college acqmred the Towson site. 

Other buildings on the campus serve as homes for the chief 
engineer and the superintendent of grounds. 

FACILITIES 

The Library, now located in the modem Albert S. Cook Li- 
brary building, includes over 60,000 catalogued books in addition 
to a collection of 5,000 volumes in the library of the Lida Lee Tall 
School. The Cook library also houses periodicals, courses of study, 
text books, pictures, pamphlets, standardized tests, slides, film strips, 
maps, phonograph records and other audio-visual aids. A reserve 
book section is located near the main charging desk. 

The Dining Room in Newell Hall has a seating capacity of 500 
persons. It is open to day students and faculty at lunch time. 

The Auditorium located in a wing of Stephens Hall has a seat- 
ing capacity of one thousand in main floor and balcony. It is 
equipped with a concert grand piano and a large electronic organ. 
The stage has recently been supplied with a modem lighting system 
for the use of the dramatic groups. 

The Student Centre on the lower floor of the dining hall wing 
has a snack bar, bookshop, recreation room, loimge, a small dining 
room, offices for student organizations, a chapel, study rooms, and 
an outdoor patio. In the Lounge, the art department regularly spon- 
sors a series of art exhibits which are open to the public. 

13 



The Athletic Field in the north part of the campus is completely 
tile-drained and surrounded by a quarter-mile cinder track. It is used 
for track, soccer, and baseball. Tennis courts, archery ranges and 
facilities for other outdoor activities are nearby. 

The Post Office located on the ground floor of Stephens Hall is 
a regular branch of the Baltimore Post Office. It is open daily from 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday for the 
sale of stamps and money orders and for mailing letters and packages. 

The Glen, containing ten acres of land, is developed as a con- 
servation and recreation area. It is registered as a bird sanctuary 
and is a United States bird banding station. Science classes use the 
Glen as a laboratory. Several outdoor fireplaces and a large shelter 
with fireplace provide opportunity for outdoor social activities. 

An Aviation Center is operated by the science department. It is 
equipped with a Link Trainer and is used by college students, and 
pupils from the Lida Lee Tall School and from neighboring public 
schools. 



FUTURE DEVELOPMENT 

The sharp increase in enrollment on the elementary and sec- 
ondary level is certain to bring heavy increases in college enrollment. 
It has been estimated that Towson can expect an enrollment of 5000 
or more students within the next decade. 

Towson has been fortunate to secure the services of a nationally 
recognized firm of landscape architects who have developed a master 
plan for the placement of future buildings. 

A new women's residence hall will be under construction this 
year as well as an addition to the college dining hall. Scheduled next 
for construction are a science building, a new health and physical 
-education building and an additional men's residence hall. 

Additional needed facilities include: auditorium-fine arts build- 
ing, service building, another classroom building, addition to the 
jlibrary, and student union. 



14 



ADMISSION 

ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program is granted to all 
applicants whose academic and personal qualifications and interest 
in the teaching profession give promise of success in the College. 
Because of limited facilities, the College reserves the right to close 
admissions when no further space remains. It is therefore advisable 
for high school students to make their college choice at the close of 
the junior year or early in the senior year. 

Students seeking admission should file applications by December 
of the senior year. Part I is submitted to the College Admissions 
Office and Part II is filed with the high school counselor with the 
request that it be forwarded to the College immediately upon the 
close of the first semester. It is requested that all admission material 
reach the College not later than March 15, prior to the September 
when admission is desired. Admission for February is limited to 
students with advanced standing or students who have been out of 
high school at least one year. These applications should be filed by 
December 1. No applications for February admission will be 
accepted after January. 

Applicants with excellent records are granted admission on the 
basis of seven semesters of high school work, with the understanding 
that the remaining high school work will be satisfactory. Other 
applicants are granted tentative admission or notified that the de- 
cision concerning admisson will be postponed until June. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Graduation from approved high school.* 

An approved high school is a standard public high school 
or an accredited non-public secondary school. 

2. Recommendation from local school officials. 

Each candidate for admission must be recommended by 
the high school principal. 

3. Specific subject matter units. 

All applicants must have completed a well-organized cur- 



AppHcants over 19 years of age who are not graduates of approved high 
schools may qualify for admission by making satisfactory grades in the 
Equivalence Examinations. The State Department of Education will issue 
equivalence diplomas based upon tests given by the Department or will 
accept the records from USAFI for veterans. 

15 



liculum totaling 16 units, including the following subjects required 
for graduation from any Maryland public high school: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 1 unit 

Social Sciences, of which 1 unit must 

be United States History 3 units 

Science 2 units 

Electives 6 units 

Total 16 units 

4. Achievement in scholarship, 

a. The scholarship standards for students entering from Balti- 
more City and from the counties, though based on different mark- 
ing systems, are approximately the same. They are as follows: 

County Students. The scholarship standard set by the State Board 
of Education as the basis for certification by the high school prin- 
cipal for college entrance requires that the applicant shall have 
made a grade of A or B in at least 60 percent of the college entrance 
courses and a grade of C or higher in all other college entrance 
courses taken during the last two years of high school. Students not 
meeting this average may be considered for admission on the 
recommendation of the high school principal. 

Baltimore City Students. The agreement with the State Depart- 
ment of Education on the scholarship standards recommended by 
the Board of School Commissioners of Baltimore City as the basis 
of certification for admission to the teachers colleges is that the stu- 
dent must have made an average of 80 per cent in the last two years 
of high school work. Students with averages between 75 and 80 may 
be considered for admission on the recommendation of the high 
school principal. 

b. The testing programs now operating in the high schools 
and the freshman testing program of the college are regarded as 
sources of important supplementary data. Results of these tests are 
used in analyzing a student's potentialities and may serve as addi- 
tional bases for determining a student's readiness for college. The 
college participates in the American College testing program. 

c. Students entering from private schools are considered tmder 
the same scholarship standards as those coming from public high 
schools. Some of the private schools use letter grades, while others 
follow a niunerical grading system. 

5. Certification by the College Physician. 

Applicants must meet acceptable standards of health and 
physical fitness; therefore a thorough physical examination by the 
College Physician is required of all students. Complete speech and 
hearing tests are required of those referred to the speech clinic by 
the College Physician or the Admissions Office. 

16 



6. Citizenship in the United States. 

According to a bylaw passed by the State Board of Education, 
only citizens of the United States shall be employed in the State 
public school system or admitted to the state teachers colleges. The 
Board may make exceptions in special cases upon the recommenda- 
tion of the College and the State Superintendent of Schools. 

THE PLEDGE TO TEACH IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND 

Every Maryland student applying for admission to the Teacher 
Education program is required to sign the pledge to teach two years 
in Maryland immediately following graduation unless temporarily 
released by the State Board of Education. 

A student who for any reason cannot teach immediately upon 
graduation is expected to secure from the President of the College 
a deferment or a release. 

Deferments may be granted for periods of one or two years 
for reasons deemed valid by the president. A release from the 
pledge to teach is granted only in rare circumstances when it is 
obvious that fulfilling the pledge would be a virtual impossibility. 

A student who, upon graduation, does not teach and does not 
obtain a release or deferment shall have entered on his permanent 
record a statement that he is not entitled to honorable dismissal 
because of his failure to fulfill his obligation to the State. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

1. Secure an application blank from the guidance department 
of the high school or from the Admissions Office of the 
College. 

2. Complete Part I of the application and forward to the Ad- 
missions Office with the appHcation fee of ten dollars. Give 
Part II of application to the high school covmselor at the 
time of submitting Part I to the College. 

3. Entrance tests (American College Test) are given at a 
designated testing center. Students who have submitted 
applications are notified of the date and place to report for 
entrance examinations. 

4. The high school counselor will send Part II of application 
to the College Admissions Office as soon as the grades for 
the first semester of the senior year are available. 

5. As soon as all admission material is on file, the student is 
sent official information concerning eligibility. After ofTicial 
notification of eligibility, the student is asked to send an 
advance payment of fifteen dollars to the College as well as 
a ten-dollar room reservation fee if eligible for residence on 
the campus. 

17 



ADMISSION TO THE ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAM 

The requirements for admission to the Arts and Sciences program 
are the same as those to the Teacher Education program, except 
that the applicant to the program in Arts and Sciences does not 
have to meet as rigid physical standards as the Teacher Education 
student. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND ADVANCED CREDIT FOR 
ENTERING STUDENTS 

The College does not wish students to repeat work already 
taken. Entering freshmen who have had the opportunity for ad- 
vanced work may receive advanced placement (and in some cases 
advanced credit) for this work. 

During the spring prior to admission or during the opening 
week, freshmen take placement tests in various fields, and registra- 
tion is based on the results of these tests. 

Students who would like advanced credit as well as advanced 
placement are required to take the Advanced Placement Tests of 
the College Entrance Examination Board in May of the senior year 
of secondary school. These tests are scored and sent to the College 
about September 1; they are then considered along with grades in 
these subjects and the recommendations by departments concerned. 
At the time of registration students are notified about advanced 
placement and credit. 

A bulletin of information about the Advanced Placement Tests 
may be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, 
P.O. Box 592, Princeton, N. J. 

TRANSFER BETWEEN ARTS AND SCIENCES 
AND TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Students in either Teacher Education or Arts and Sciences 
desiring to transfer to the other program in the College may secure 
the necessary request forms in the Registrar's Office. 

Those seeking transfer to Teacher Education from Arts and 
Sciences must meet the health, speech, and academic standards and 
must sign the Pledge to Teach. Usually, transfer will be considered 
only for the September semester and only for students who have 
enrolled for two semesters. 

All applicants for transfer within the College must have the 
approval of the Committee on Admissions and Standards. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

In addition to meeting the regulations under Admission Re- 
quirements, an applicant for advanced standing must present com- 
plete records from each college attended and an acceptable aca- 

18 



demic record from the college that he last attended. Personal recom- 
mendations from colleges previously attended are also required. 

Courses offered for transfer credit must be of G grade quality 
or better. 

A satisfactory record in this college is necessary to establish 
advanced standing. Advanced standing is provisional until the stu- 
dent shows ability to maintain a satisfactory record in this college. 

TRANSFER BETWEEN MARYLAND TEACHERS COLLEGES 

A student may not transfer from one Maryland state teachers 
college to another except by written permission from the State 
Board of Education. A student with failures in his courses will not 
be considered for transfer. 

SUMMER, PART-TIME AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Because of the urgent need for elementary school teachers in 
Maryland, the College provides for part-time and summer study as 
follows: (1) a program for graduates of liberal arts colleges, to be 
taken during three six-week summer terms or in two semesters on 
the campus, (2) part-time study, including late afternoon or eve- 
ning classes for public school teachers on emergency certificates who 
wish to work toward their degrees, (3) a six-week summer session 
for (a) undergraduates who are former students of the College and 
hold teaching contracts or former students of other colleges with 
teaching positions who wish to work toward a degree, (b) present 
students of the College who have their advisers' approval, (c) stu- 
dents currently enrolled in other colleges who have the permission 
of the institution where matriculated to attend the Towson sum- 
mer session, and (d) public elementary school teachers who qualify 
for admission to the Graduate Program (see page 150). Further 
information regarding the summer session should be requested from 
the Director at least one month prior to the date for registration. 
A bulletin is published early in each calendar year. 



19 



EXPENSES 

TUITION 

For Maryland residents who register for the Teacher Education 
program no tuition is charged. In Heu of paying tuition they pledge 
at least two years of teaching service in the public schools of the 
State upon graduation. 

Those who enroll in the Arts and Sciences program pay $200 
per year tuition. 

For out-of-state students the tuition is $450 per year for enroll- 
ment in either the Teacher Education or the Arts and Sciences 
program. 

Part-time students (normally those who register for less than 
12 semester hours) in the regular session, and all summer students, 
pay fifteen dollars per credit hour each term. Out-of-state summer 
students pay an additional fifteen dollars. Graduate student ex- 
penses are outlined on page 152. 

Tuition charges are subject to change at any time. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING COSTS 

Students who live on the campus pay $312 for room and board 
for the academic year. Students approved as boarding students for 
whom residence facilities are not available pay $225 a year for meals 
only. As residence space becomes available these students who are 
eligible to reside in the dormitories will be required to room in one 
of the halls, at which time an adjustment will be made in the rate 
charged for board and room. 

For those students who enter the dormitory after the beginning 
of a semester, the charge will be prorated for the remainder of the 
semester plus one week. 

For all students who live off campus and take their meals in 
the college dining room, the cost for meals is $225 per year — $112.50 
per semester. 

Rates for living expenses are subject to change by the State 
Board of Education. 

OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

An activities fee of twenty-five dollars a year is assigned to the 
Student Government Association fund for class dues, student pub- 
lications, dramatics, assembly programs and other authorized proj- 
ects. 

20 



An athletic fee of fifteen dollars a year is assigned to the ath- 
letic associations and used for the athletic and physical education 
program. 

A limited number of lockers are available for student use. The 
college assumes no responsibility for personal property placed in 
the lockers. There is a fifty-cent locker fee and a fifty-cent gymnas- 
ium locker fee. 

A curriculum fee of $10.00 each semester ($20.00 per year) is 
used for supplies and materials for classroom instruction. 

Each student shares a mailbox with another student. There is 
an annual fee of fifty cents for the mail box. 

A student is expected to buy the textbooks for his courses. 
These may be purchased in the College Bookshop. Students are 
required to buy gymnasium suits for the courses in physical educa- 
tion. 

A late-registration fee of five dollars is charged to any student 
who registers after the date of registration named in the Catalogue 
calendar. This fee also applies if a student does not pre-register as 
prescribed. 

There is a ten-dollar graduation fee for those receiving the 
Master's degree. 

Part-time and summer students are charged fifteen dollars per 
credit hour for courses audited. 

All fees are subject to change at any time. 

STUDENT TEACHER TRANSPORTATION FEE 

Beginning with the Fall Term 1962, each student is respon- 
sible for his own transportation to and from his student teaching 
center. 

Students unable to make other arrangements for transportation 
to centers not accessible by public transportation or by other means 
may apply for transportation at the college Business Office. When- 
ever possible, college vehicles will be made available to groups of 
students at rates specified below. Such transportation cannot be 
guaranteed, however. 

Transportation to student teaching centers when provided by 
the college will be charged at the rate of sixty cents per day, payable 
in advance for each student teaching experience. This will mean 
the following approximate amounts: 

Students in the Kindergarten-Primary division — $19 per ex- 
perience ($38 for both terms) ; 

Students in the Elementary division — $36 per experience; 
Students in the Secondary division — $30 per experience. 

21 



No refunds will be made after the second week of full-time 
teaching. 

No college vehicle will be sent to: centers within walking dis- 
tance (two miles) ; centers available by public transportation; cen- 
ters which may be reached through other arrangements which may 
be made with (1) students driving their own cars, (2) rides provided 
by teachers in the school, (3) other possible transportation facil- 
ities. 

Vehicles will be made available only if at least five students are 
involved. The driver will be allowed to ride without payment of 
the fee. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES: MARYLAND RESIDENTS 

Teacher Education Students 

Semester Semester Total for 
I II Year 

Activities Fee $ 25.00 $ 25.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 15.00 

Mail Box and Locker Fee 1.00 1.00 

Curriculum Fee 10.00 $ 10.00 20.00 

Total Day Students $ 51.00 $ 10.00 $ 61.00 

Arts and Sciences Students 

Fees as above $ 51.00 $ 10.00 $ 61.00 

Tuition 100.00 100.00 200.00 

Total— Day Students $151.00 $110.00 $261.00 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the 
State Teachers College at Towson for the exact amount of the 
charges. All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
No student will be admitted to classes until such payment has been 
made. A late fee of $5.00 is charged for failure to pay before or on 
the day of registration. 

ADVANCE PAYMENTS 

Each applicant must pay an application fee of $10.00 and no 
application will be processed without this fee. When accepted, each 
applicant must make an advance payment of $15.00 in order to 
reserve a place in the college. Both the application and advance 
payment fees are applied to the total student fees due at the time 
of registration. The application fee is not refundable. The advance 
payment fee is refundable only when the applicant is not eligible 
and admission is denied. 

22 



A deposit of $10.00 for room reservation is required of all ap- 
plicants who are eligible to live on the campus because of living 
outside the commuting boundaries. This fee is applied to the final 
amount of room and board due at the time of registration. 

The above room deposit is refundable if the student cancels 
his application and notifies the Admissions Office, in writing, 
prior to June 30 for those entering in September and prior to 
December 15 for those entering in February, or if the College denies 
admission to the applicant. 

All advance payments are sent to the Admissions Office. 

LIABILITY FOR UNPAID TUITION 

A Maryland student enrolled in the Teacher Education pro- 
gram pays no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the 
State. 

If he leaves before graduation or transfers to the Arts and 
Sciences program and requests a transcript for the purpose of con- 
tinuing his education in a college program which does not lead 
to teacher certification, he will be billed at the Arts and Sciences 
tuition rate for the education he obtained at the College. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he 
transfers to a Maryland institution which has a teacher education 
program approved by the State Department of Education and if he 
reaffirms his pledge to teach for two years in the Maryland public 
schools upon graduation. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

A student withdrawing from the College must complete an 
official withdrawal card and file it in the Registrar's Office before 
he is entitled to any refund. Refunds are made on the following 
basis: 

Day Students 

A day student who withdraws within two weeks after his 
initial registration is entitled to a refund of fees paid and to a 
refund of tuition for the semester minus ten dollars. After the 
two-week period no fees or tuition are refunded. 

Boarding Students 

A boarding student who withdraws from the college receives 
refunds for fees and tuition in accordance with the regulation for 
day students. The refund of payment for room and meals is sub- 
ject to the following regulations : 

1. A student who withdraws from the dormitory within two 
weeks after the initial registration will be charged for one 
week in excess of his residence in the College. 

23 



1 

2. A student who withdraws from the dormitory at the re- 
quest of the College after the first two weeks of any semester 
will be charged for one week in excess of his residence in 
the College. 

3. A student who withdraws from the dormitory on his own 
or his guardian's initiative after the two weeks following 
registration and before mid-semester will receive no refund 
of room and board for the first half of the semester. If the 
withdrawal occurs after the mid-semester, there will be no 
refvmd of room and board paid for the entire semester. 



24 



STUDENT LIFE PROGRAM 

A Student Life Council, consisting of faculty members and stu- 
dents, coordinates the program, establishes policy, and handles 
cases referred to it. The Council is responsible to the President of 
the College. College housing and boarding, the health program, 
financial aid, part-time employment, the advisory system, orienta- 
tion of new students, student publications, clubs and religious 
groups, career guidance, campus traffic involving students, and the 
Student Centre are all part of the student life program. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Medical advice and emergency office treatment are available 
and free to all students. In cases of contagious disease or acute ill- 
ness parents are notified and are required to remove the student 
from the campus for the duration of the condition. The profes- 
sional staff consists of the college physician, two full-time graduate 
nurses and a licensed, full-time practical nurse. The physician 
maintains office hours at the College and is on call at all times. 

A physical examination by the college physician is required 
of all students prior to the time of admission. Additional examina- 
tions are given when conditions warrant. A student is expected to 
correct remedial defects immediately. Failure to follow the physi- 
cian's instructions will jeopardize a student's status in the college. 
Annual chest X-rays are compulsory for all students. Health educa- 
tion and prevention of disease are essential parts of the college 
health program. 

The college assumes no financial responsibility for illness of 
sufficient seriousness to require hospitalization, X-rays, or special 
treatment. The college does not assume financial responsibilty for 
any injury incurred upon the athletic field or in any physical edu- 
cation class. 

A student who has a physical condition which prevents com- 
plete participation in the regular physical education program may 
be permitted upon authorization of the college physician and the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards to take a modified pro- 
gram or be exempt from physical education requirements. 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

For the benefit of those students who wish to participate, the 
college enters into an agreement with an approved insurance com- 
pany to cover the students against any accidental injury either at 
college or at home during the college year. Participation in the 
plan is voluntary and costs approximately $4.00 for women and 
$6.30 for men. Students desiring this coverage should make appli- 
cation at the Business Office. 

25 



LIDA LEE TALL HEALTH SERVICES 

The children attending the Lida Lee Tall School have the 
advantage of services rendered in the health suite of their school. 
A nurse is on duty two hours a day, and the college physician con- 
ducts physical examinations there. Additional services are available 
to the children in the college Health Center. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

POLICIES 

Due to increasing enrollment and limited facilities for campus 
living, applications for residence hall space can be accepted only 
from students enrolled in the Teacher Education Program. Arts 
and Sciences students who are not able to commute will be given 
assistance in securing rooms in college-approved homes off campus 
and the privilege of taking their meals in the College dining hall. 

To qualify for living on the campus, a student must be single, 
enrolled in the Teachers College, and carrying a minimum of 
twelve semester hours of credit. 

A married student whose husband or wife lives beyond a 
fifty-mile radius of the College may also be eligible for residence 
living. A Housing Committee handles all exceptions on an individual 
basis. 

Single students under twenty-one years of age who live in off- 
campus housing other than their legal residence must live in col- 
lege-approved homes. These students are responsible to the Director 
of Residence Halls and are expected to adhere to the rules and 
regulations of the residence councils. 

Priority for residence is given to the Teacher Education stu- 
dent who resides beyond a twenty-mile radius of State Teachers 
College at Towson. A student who resides beyond a ten-mile 
radius but within a twenty-mile radius of the college may live in 
residence only if he lives beyond public transportation by one mile, 
or lives more than two hours away by existing public transporta- 
tion. A student who resides within a ten-mile radius of the State 
Teachers College at Towson is ineligible for residence. Assignments 
to rooms are made only after the student has had an interview 
with a member of the residence hall staff. 

Students who have reserved a room and entered a residence 
hall may withdraw to become day students only in case of change 
of residence or student teaching in their home areas. An adjust- 
ment of fees is made in the Business Office for special cases. If 
vacancies occur in the halls during the year, students on the wait- 
ing list may be admitted according to their dates of application, 
commuting problems or other special circumstances. 

A student withdrawing from the Teacher Education Program 

26 



must also withdraw from the residence halls, A student who chooses 
to live elsewhere during his student teaching assignment forfeits his 
reserved space but may apply for another room in residence should 
he wish to return to campus. 

All residence hall students are expected to leave the halls no 
later than twenty-four hours following their last examination at 
the end of each semester. (See the college calendar for times of 
opening of residence halls.) No student is permitted to remain in 
residence more than forty-eight hours after he has ceased attending 
classes. 

ROOM FURNISHING FOR RESIDENCE STUDENTS 

Each student will need at least four single sheets, one pair of 
blankets and pillow cases, spread, quilted pad for bed 72 x 30 
inches, towels, and two laundry bags. Bed linen and towels must 
have woven tags attached giving the student's full name. 

ACTIVITIES 

Men and women students in the residence halls elect as their 
governing bodies a Women's Residence Council and a Men's Resi- 
dence Council. There are also three subordinate bodies of the 
Women's Residence Council, known as Prettyman Hall House 
Council, Newell-Richmond Hall House Council and the Judicial 
Board. These groups in cooperation with the residence personnel 
formulate policies pertaining to group living and arrange a pro- 
gram of activities for the resident students. The Judicial Boards 
handle cases of infractions in residence. Any student may be required 
to leave residence on the recommendation of the Judicial Board and 
its acceptance by College authorities. 

The College encourages students to attend services in the 
churches of their choice and makes it possible for them to meet 
the local clergymen. 

Students who are absent frequently over weekends miss much 
of the education that living at college affords. Students are there- 
fore encouraged to remain on the campus for as many weekends as 
possible. 

FINANCIAL AID 

All students attending the College receive subsidy from the 
State, and residents of the State of Maryland enrolled in the Teach- 
ers College pay no tuition. Still, there are the costs of residence 
living, transportation, books and other incidental matters which 
some students are unable to meet. Limited assistance is available 
through the scholarship fund or one of the loan funds. 

The establishment of policy concerning scholarships and loans 
and the administration of funds is under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Financial Aid, subject to the approval of the Student Life 
Council and the President of the College. 

27 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships were established by 
the will of Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of J. Charles Linthicum, 
who was a member of the class of 1886. The fund is administered 
by the trustees of the estate and the college committee. Both fresh- 
men and upperclassmen are eligible for these twenty-five awards. 
Eleven of the scholarships have been set aside for entering freshmen. 
High school seniors who are contemplating entering the college and 
who need some assistance in meeting college expenses for the first year 
should write to the Director of Admissions for scholarship application 
forms. These applications must be filed no later than May 1. 

Income from the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund is allocated 
in fifty-dollar amounts to students in the Teachers College. This 
fund was begun by Miss Richmond, a former principal of the 
normal school, and augmented by her friends. Five scholarships 
are usually awarded. 

One upper-class student may receive the Minnie V. Medwedeff 
Endowment Scholarship. This award is made annually to an out- 
standing student selected by the trustees of the fund. The scholar- 
ship was established in memory of Minnie V. Medwedeff by her 
father. Miss Medwedeff was an instructor in the College from 1924 
until her death in 1935. 

Other scholarships, usually $100, are donated by various com- 
munity groups. Service clubs, parent-teacher associations, women's 
clubs and businesses are among the groups which furnish scholar- 
ships. Some of the organizations ask the college to select the award 
winners and some select their own recipients. 

Upper-class students may secure application blanks for all col- 
lege allocated scholarships from the Business Office and file them 
with the chairman of the Committee on Financial Aid. For con- 
sideration for the academic year, applications must be filed by 
May 1, prior to the September term. 

LOANS 

Students in need of funds to meet college expenses may submit 
an application to the chairman of the Committee on Financial Aid 
at any time the need becomes evident. College loans are made at a 
low rate of interest and can be renewed until after the student has 
received a position. 

Four loan funds have been established for college students. 
They are the Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund, the College Loan 
Fund, the Edward Moulton Fund and the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program. 

The Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund was established by Sarah 
E. Richmond, who was connected with the College for fifty-five 
years as student, teacher, principal, and dean of women. This fund 
has been increased by gifts from the alumni association. The Sarah 

28 



E. Richmond Fund is administered by a special alumni committee 
consisting of Mr. George Schluderberg, Mrs. Grace Carroll, and 
Mrs. Mary N. Lynch. Requests for loans from this fund may be 
made to Mr. Schluderberg, 3613 Lochearn Drive, Baltimore 7, 
Maryland. 

The College Loan Fund has a value of $10,800 and was made 
by contributions from the following: the Class of 1900 Memorial to 
Katherine Muhlback, the Class of 1925, the Normal Literary So- 
ciety, the Pestalozzi Society, the Reese Arnold Memorial, the Lillian 
Jackson Memorial, the Esther Sheel Memorial (Class of 1927), the 
Carpenter Memorial, the Eunice K. Crabtree Fund (gift of the Class 
of 1931), the Pauline Rutledge Fund (gift of the Class of 1934), the 
Pearle Blood Fund (gift of the Class of 1940), the 1933 Gift Loan 
Fund of Faculty and Students, the Gertrude Carley Memorial, 
Washington County Alumni, the Grace Boryer Downin Fund, the 
Class of 1941 Fund, the Martha Richmond Fund, the Tower Light 
Fund, the M. Clarice Berch Fund (gift of the Class of 1951), the 
Bettie Sipple Fund sponsored by the Maryland Federation of 
Women's Clubs, the Lucy Scott Memorial Fund, the James B. 
O'Toole, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund, the Ellen Pratt Hamilton 
Memorial Loan Fund, and the Rodgers Forge PTA Loan Fund in 
Memory of Ellen Pratt Hamilton. 

The Edward Moulton Fund, with assets of $2,700, established 
in memory of a student of the Class of 1957, is a short-term loan 
fund limited to $75 and open to all students, interest free. Applica- 
tions for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of Stu- 
dents. 

The National Defense Student Loan Program was established 
by the National Defense Education Act of 1958. The Act provides 
that the repayment of the principal of the loan, together with 
accrued interest thereon, shall be made to the college over a ten 
year period beginning one year after the date when the borrower 
ceases to be a full-time student and ending eleven years after such 
date. The loan bears simple interest upon the unpaid balance at 
the rate of 3 per cent per year. Interest does not begin to accrue 
until one year from the date the borrower ceases to be a full-time 
student. The loan, and interest thereon, of any borrower who serves 
as a full-time teacher in a public elementary or secondary school 
within a state shall be cancelled up to a maximum of 50 per cent 
at the rate of 10 per cent of the amount of the loan plus interest 
thereon for each academic year of service. Under provisions of the 
Act, students must meet four qualifications to be eligible for as- 
sistance: they must be citizens or permanent residents of the United 
States; they must be in good academic standing and, in the opinion of 
the college, capable of maintaining a strong academic record; they 
must be full-time undergraduate students; they must show financial 
need. Students attending the college may obtain application forms 
from the Business Office. High school seniors should write to the Chair- 
man of the Committee on Financial Aid at the college. 

29 



TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

Students who operate vehicles in the Towson area must register 
these vehicles with the Business Office at the time of course regis- 
tration. The operation of vehicles on the Towson campus and the 
use of campus parking facilities are privileges extended to eligible 
student personnel. Parking space limitations require the issuing of 
parking permits on the basis of student need. Detailed traffic and 
parking regulations are issued and must be adhered to in order to 
avoid fines and other disciplinary action. A student-faculty commit- 
tee establishes and carries out policy imder the auspices of the Stu- 
dent Life Council. 

ADVISEMENT 

PRE-ADMISSION 

A close relationship exists between the guidance departments 
of the high schools and the admissions office of the College. This 
relationship enables students to become acquainted with the Col- 
lege offerings early in their high school course and to work toward 
meeting the admission requirements. Representatives of the Col- 
lege participate in college nights and career days sponsored by 
school systems throughout the state. Visiting days for high school 
seniors are held on the campus each fall, followed by an open house 
for parents of high school juniors and seniors. All of these direct 
contacts with the college assist juniors and seniors in determining 
their college choices. 

After an application is filed, each student is asked to report to 
the College for a physical examination and an interview with a 
member of the admissions staff. The high school record and results 
of the entrance test aid the interviewer in counseling the student. 
If there is doubt concerning the eligibility of an applicant, he is 
assisted in making other plans and contacts. If the applicant is 
planning residence housing, the admissions interview is followed by 
an interview with a member of the residence staff. 

FRESHMEN 

Selected faculty members and senior students serve as personal 
and professional counselors to freshmen. Personal interviews, group 
meetings, and laboratory experiences are provided to promote self- 
orientation and to help freshmen explore interests and abilities of 
professional significance. This program of personal and professional 
orientation is organized and administered as a regular part of the 
college curriculum. During the first semester Teacher Education 
students participate for three days in the public schools of the state 
as partial preparation for the selection of a suitable teaching area. Arts 
and Sciences students spend this time in career study under the super- 
vision of an adviser. Preparation of the career report may include 
a self-analysis, job analysis, community contacts, the taking of special 
tests and a study of professional literature. (See Orientation 0.090 

30 



and 0.095, page ( ,, and Freshman Advisory Council, page ( ), 
for further details.) 

On the first Sunday of the fall semester, parents of all freshmen 
students are invited to spend an afternoon at the college. This oc- 
casion provides an opportunity for parents to tour the campus and 
to meet other parents, students, and some faculty members. 

UPPPERCLASSMEN 

At the end of the freshman year, each student selects a faculty 
member w^ho will serve as his adviser for the remaining years the 
student is in college. Students should request an adviser 
in the area of their primary academic interest, if they 
wish to qualify for a major in that department. The relationship 
between student and adviser provides the student with an under- 
standing adult with whom he may discuss his personal, professional 
and educational problems, and consider his special needs. When 
such assistance seems desirable, students are encouraged to consult 
instructors, the deans, and other college officials. 

PLACEMENT 

Plans are being made to provide a transfer and placement 
service for students in the program of Arts and Sciences. 

The supervisors of Teacher Education students furnish the 
seniors with whom they work information concerning placement 
in city or county schools. The Dean of Instruction helps to coordinate 
the requests from superintendents of schools for candidates at the 
various teaching levels. From the Registrar's Office are sent out 
complete records of each graduate, including a summary of his 
progress in the college and a full report of his student teaching. 
Each fall the College sponsors a Superintendents' Day. Teacher Edu- 
cation students are given an opportunity to confer with representa- 
tives of the various Maryland school systems. 

Every effort is made to inform interested students of graduate 
fellowships and assistantships and to assist students in making appli- 
cation for such grants. Literature for grants is available in the 
Office of the Dean of Students. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

On Campus 

Opportunity for student employment on campus is limited. 
New students are not eligible until their second semester in attendance. 
All students on the college payroll must be in good standing. Normally, 
no student is employed on campus beyond twelve hours weekly. 
The college library, cafeteria, various offices and departments em- 
ploy students. All requests for employment are filed in the Office of 
the Dean of Students. 

31 



Off Campus 

The Dean of Students posts notices from outsiders requesting 
students for employment during the academic year and during the 
summer. The college can assume no responsibility for working con- 
ditions or remuneration. 

VETERAN STUDENTS 

Students entitled to the vocational rehabilitation and educa- 
tional assistance offered through the Veterans Administration, 
namely, Disabled Veterans, Korean War Veterans and War Or- 
phans, should consult the nearest office of the Veterans Adminis- 
tration at least 60 days prior to college entrance and should present 
their VA Certificates for Education and Training at the Registrar's 
Office during the college registration period in September or 
February. The college appoints a member of the faculty to sei've 
as adviser to students receiving educational benefits through the 
Veterans Administration. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

High school senior men should consult their counselors for in- 
formation on the Qualification Test administered by the Selective 
Service to determine men eligible for Class II-S student deferments. 
Students admitted to college may request the Registrar's Office, im- 
mediately after registration, to make a report on their academic 
progress at the end of each academic year to their local Selective 
Service Board. For this purpose each student must present his 
Classification Card at the Registrar's Office. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Extracurricular activities are provided for the many and varied 
interests of Towson students. Out-of-class activities are recognized 
as worthwhile complements and supplements to a college education, 
and students are encouraged to participate. 

STUDENT GOVERNING ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association is the student govern- 
mental body authorized by the administration of the college. Upon 
enrollment at Towson each student automatically becomes a mem- 
ber of the SGA. The organization is composed of an Executive 
Committee and a Student Senate comprised of elected representa- 
tives of each campus extracurricular organization. 

The SGA operates on a budget derived from the required stu- 
dent activity fee and has fiscal autonomy. To promote the objectives 
outlined in its constitution, the SGA maintains subcommittees 
ranging in scope from national and international affairs to local 

32 



social events. Committee membership is open to all interested 
students. 

Each College organization must secure the approval of the Stu- 
dent Government Association before it may function on the campus. 
Once an organization's constitution is approved, that club is eligible 
for financial subsidy from the SGA. 

Student Residence Councils 

The Men's and Women's Residence Councils, with the coopera- 
tion of all residence students, are responsible for establishing and 
maintaining standards of group living and for promoting the social 
program of the residence halls. The Resident Director and her as- 
sistants cooperate with these groups. 

Student Centre Board 

The main objective of the Student Centre Board is to set the 
policies governing the Student Centre, promote student friendliness, 
social life, and general college spirit, and to add to the educational 
and cultural atmosphere of the College through the use of facilities 
provided, whenever such use may contribute to the convenience of 
students, faculty and their friends. The Student Centre Board is 
responsible to the President of the College. 

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 

Freshman Advisory Council 

The Freshman Advisory Council is an organization whose pur- 
pose is to aid new students in becoming acquainted with college 
life. The Orientation Program during the first week at college is 
especially designed by the FAC and the faculty to answer all ques- 
tions that arise from students concerning clubs and organizations, 
social functions, or academic matters, and to present a comprehen- 
sive view of life at Towson. 

Alpha Phi Omega 

Alpha Phi Omega, a national service fraternity, is composed of 
men who are or have been Boy Scouts and who have a desire to 
serve others. There are many opportunities for service and social 
interchange on campus and regional levels. 

Circle K Club 

The Circle K Club is sponsored jointly by the Towson Kiwanis 
Club and the College. It is a men's organization founded on the 
principles of Kiwanis International and dedicated to service to the 
College and its community. 



33 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Inter-Faith Council 

The Inter-Faith Council is composed of the president and a 
representative from each religious organization on campus. This 
group is responsible for the coordination of religious activities at 
Towson. 

Inter-Denominational Club 

The YM-YWCA (formerly the Student Christian Association), 
the oldest religious organization on campus, offers an opportunity 
to explore the meaning of the Christian faith and its insights into 
problems college students face. The activities consist of vespers, 
Bible study, discussion groups, picnics, square dances, and special 
parties. 

The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship 

The Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship aims to strengthen the 
spiritual Hves of its members by the study of the Holy Scripture and 
by helping others to understand Jesus Christ as their personal 
Savior. 

All members of the student body are invited to join these 
organizations. 

Denominational Clubs 

Baptist Student Union 

Canterbury Club, for Episcopal students 

Christian Science Organization 

Jewish Students Association 

Lutheran Student Association 

Newman Club, for Catholic students 

United Campus Christian Fellowship, for Presbyterian, Dis- 
ciples of Christ, Evangelical United Brethren and United Church 
of Christ students 

Wesleyan Fellowship, for Methodist students 

MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

The Music Department sponsors a number of professional groups, 
(listed on 107) for which college credit is given. For those 
interested in choral music, there are the Men's Glee Club, Women's 
Glee Club, the Concert Choir, Towson Singers (a madrigal group), 
and the Towsonettes (women's popular music group). For those 
interested in instrumental music there are three Instrumental En- 
sembles and the College Band. 



34 



There are also the following informal music groups: 

Dance Band 

The Dance Band studies dance band literature and performs 
at College functions including concerts and dances. 

Notables 

The Notables are a small, mixed vocal group devoted to the 
performance of quality- type popular music. 

String Quartet 

The String Quartet is an organization devoted to the per- 
formance of string music literature. 

Student Christian Association Choir 

The Student Christian Association Choir is composed of resi- 
dent women students selected on the basis of talent and interest. 
The choir sings for various programs sponsored by the YM-YWCA 
and for college assemblies. In addition, the choir presents concerts 
for churches and other organizations in the Baltimore area. 

Tower Belles 

The Tower Belles is a girls' vocal trio which performs for various 
college events. 

DRAMATIC ORGANIZATION 

Glen Players 

The Glen Players, the College dramatic organization, offers an 
opportunity for those interested in all phases of dramatic produc- 
tion to display their talent. Actors, those preferring backstage work, 
and those interested in theatre in general are encouraged to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the group. 

The types of productions presented range from Greek drama 
to contemporary musicals and incorporate many aspects of dramatic 
talent. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

The International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club is a student organization 
designed to acquaint students with the international problems and 
issues of the day. Members frequently attend meetings at different 
colleges in the vicinity and visit the United Nations headquarters. 
Membership is open to all students of the college. 

Naturalists 

The Naturalists is an organization which enables its members 
to enrich their scientific knowledge through field trips, lectures, and 
discussion groups. It collects and organizes scientific material for 
educational aid. 

35 



Student Education Association 

The Towson Chapter of the Student Education Association 
strives to famiHarize its members with the various phases of educa- 
tion. Active membership in the organization requires a $2.00 fee 
which serves as a membership fee for the NEA and MSTA. SEA 
work on campus is directly concerned with work in the state organ- 
ization and sponsoring visiting days for high school FTA groups. 

Young Democrats 

This organization was formed to stimulate in young people an 
active interest in governmental affairs, to foster and perpetuate the 
ideals and principles of the Democratic Party, and to promote for 
our people through its administration the highest degree of justice 
and social welfare. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

Every student enrolled at Towson is a member of either the Men's 
or Women's Athletic Association. 

Men's Athletic Association 

The College is a member of the Mason-Dixon Conference. The 
men's competitive teams include basketball, soccer, baseball, wres- 
tling, track, tennis, lacrosse and cross country. There are also oppor- 
tunities for participation in intramural activities. 

Women's Athletic Association 

Under the WAA an elective system is organized to give every 
student an opportunity to engage in the sports which she enjoys. 
Among the ojfTerings are: hockey, soccer, tennis, archery, basketball, 
badminton, lacrosse, bowling, volleyball, softball, and swimming 
(also open to men students). With completion of each activity a 
student receives ten points and when enough points are accimiulated, 
awards are presented. Besides the above activities, events with other 
colleges and intramural events are sponsored. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Talisman 

The Talisman is published under the auspices of the Student 
Government Association. Its purpose is to foster an interest in creative 
writing and to give an outlet to those students with creative abihty. 

Tower Light 

The Tower Light is the weekly official student newspaper of the 
College, by the authority of the Student Government Association. 

Tower Echoes 

Tower Echoes is the yearbook sponsored by the Student Govern- 
ment Association. 

36 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary dramatic fraternity, 
the purpose of which is to further and maintain interest in drama. 
Admission to the fraternity is by invitation and is based upon par- 
ticipation in the various phases of dramatic activity at Towson. The 
fraternity offers scholarships to deserving Towsonites to receive further 
study in some phase of dramatics. 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 

The Beta Delta Chapter of Gamma Theta Upsilon is a national 
honorary geography fraternity. The members of Gamm.a Theta Up- 
silon further their knowledge of geography through field trips, slide 
lectures, speakers and papers presented by members. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Epsilon Alpha Chapter is the local chapter of Kappa Delti Pi, 
a national honor society in education. Its purpose is to provide a full 
agenda of educational discussions, guest speakers, and services to the 
College and state. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Theta Beta is the Towson Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, national 
honorary history fraternity. Students with better than a 3.00 average 
in history and a general average of 3.00 are invited to membership. 



37 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

The college calendar, which will be found on pages 5, 6 and 7, 
indicates the dates when students must register. Students are not per- 
mitted to attend classes without having completed registration, and 
a fee is assessed for registration after the time assigned (see Expenses, 
page 21). In addition to payment of the fee, students who register 
later than one week after the first day of classes must secure permis- 
sion from the Committee on Admissions and Standards. 

TRANSFERRED CREDIT 

Credit is accepted for courses completed at other colleges and 
universities if the final mark is C or higher. This work will 
count as credit toward graduation, but the grade will not be used 
in computing the average for graduation. 

CREDIT HOURS 

The unit of credit is the semester hour. It is defined as one 
50-minute class per week (or its equivalent) for one semester. A 
three-hour class meets three 50-minute periods or two 75-minute 
periods a week for one semester. Laboratory and studio classes nor- 
mally require two or three hours in class as the equivalent of one 
college credit or semester hour. In terms of outside work, one college 
credit requires two hours of preparation for each hour in class by the 
student of average ability. 

CHANGING PROGRAMS 

Students in either Teacher Education or Arts and Sciences may 
transfer to the other program by filing a request form with the Regis- 
trar as Secretary of the Committee on Admissions and Standards. 
Those seeking transfer to Teacher Education must be in good standing 
academically and have approval of the college physician and the 
speech coordinator. The judgment of the Education Department 
Chairman in conference with the appropriate professional program 
director is sought before the committee acts on a request for transfer. 
Usually, transfers will be considered only for the full semester and 
only for students who have enrolled for two semesters. 

Those wishing to transfer to Arts and Sciences will be obligated 
in the amount of $100.00 for each semester of work completed in 
the Teacher Education program. 

EXEMPTION FROM REQUIRED COURSES 

Believing that students should not be required to devote time to 
courses the substances of which they have mastered, the college pro- 

38 



vides opportunity to qualify for exemption from required courses. 
Towson students may apply through the Dean of Instruction to be 
examined for exemption, without credit, from courses required of 
all students and those required in a major field. The department 
concerned and the college director of evaluation cooperate in the 
evaluation. When exempted, the student is privileged to choose an 
elective in any department or an advanced course in the same depart- 
ment. Required courses in the following fields are at present involved 
in this plan: English, health and physical education, mathematics, 
music, science, social science, and speech. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal student load is 15 to 17 semester hours of credit 
each semester. Permission to deviate from these hours may be sought 
from the Dean of Students. Approval for a reduced load is often 
granted for appropriate personal reasons. Permission is usually granted 
for 18 semester hours if the student has a cumulative average of 2.50 
and for 19 hours if the average is 3.00 or better. 

Students who are on academic probation, who have health prob- 
lems, or who are carrying heavy programs of work outside of the 
college may be urged by the Dean of Students to carry less than a 
normal load of classes. Blanks for requesting permission to carry 
fewer or more than 15 to 17 hours may be obtained in the Registrar's 
Ofltice. 

AUDITING COURSE 

A student may audit a course according to the following plan: 
If he is a full-time student he makes application at the end of the 
first meeting of the class to add this course to his program, using the 
change of course blank obtainable in the Registrar's Office. Permis- 
sion will be granted by the Dean of Instruction to register as an 
auditor, if there is room in the class and if this addition will not 
constitute an excessive load. No credit may be earned in courses 
which are audited, and auditors are not permitted to take examina- 
tions or receive grades. 

Individuals not registered as full-time students will follow the 
same procedure except that they will pay the established charge 
of $15.00 per credit hour. (Full-time students are not assessed addi- 
tional fees for any overloads they may be permitted to carry.) 

CHANGE OF COURSE OR SCHEDULE 

The Chairmen of departments consider requests for course 
changes during the first week of classes each semester; thereafter, re- 
quests for changes are made to the Dean of Students. 

General Rule: No change of course (adding, dropping, 
change of value or changing sections) at any time is valid unless the 
student completes the change of course form and deposits it with the 
Registrar. Failure to do so will result in a failure (WF) in the course 
or courses dropped. 

39 



Changes in courses which run less than the normal semester, 
must be made no later than the last day of the first quarter of the 
inclusive time period for the course; if withdrawal is requested after 
the end of the change period, a mark of Pass or Fail will be given 
by the instructor for the course. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified according to the number of semester hours 
completed as follows: freshmen, to 30 semester hours; sophomores, 
30 to 60 semester hours; juniors, 60 to 90 semester hours; seniors, 90 
semester hours or above. 

MARKING AND POINT SYSTEM 

A five-point marking system (A, B, C, D, F) is used to indicate 
quality of academic work. The letter A designates work of superior 
quality; B, work of quality substantially better than minimum require- 
ment for graduation; C, work of satisfactory quality meeting the 
minimum requirements for graduation; D, work of less than satisfac- 
tory quality but allowable for credit, subject to the restrictions specified 
under Degree Requirements, page 46; F, work of such unsatisfactory 
quality that no credit is given. 

A mark of Inc. (incomplete because of illness or other reason 
beyond control of the student) at the end of a semester carries no 
credit. Unless such a course is satisfactorily completed within three 
weeks after the Inc. is given, the grade for the course becomes F. 

The mark given for a course which carries no credit will be S 
(satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). 

The five-point marking system used, with the numerical points 
assigned to each grade, is as follows: 

A, 4 points 

B, 3 points 

C, 2 points 

D, 1 point 

F, points (failure) 

There are no plus or minus grades. 

The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in 
the course, then totahng the credit hours and points for all courses 
taken in the semester, and dividing the total number of points by the 
total number of hours of credit. For example: 

4 hours of A (4 points each) 16 points 

4 hours of B (3 points each) 12 points 

3 hours of C (2 points each) 6 points 

3 hours of D (1 point each) 3 points 

2 hours of F (0 points each) points 

16 Total hours 37 Total points 

40 



Dividing 37 by 16, the student's grade-point average for this 
semester is found to be 2.31. 

A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required for graduation. 
An average of better than 3.00 is usually worthy of special mention. 

STANDARDS OF WORK REQUIRED 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain at least the 
following cumulative averages: Freshmen, 1.70; Sophomores, 1.80; 
Juniors, 1.90; Seniors, 2.00. Students are placed on probation when 
the cumulative average is below the minimum standard for their 
class. 

Probation indicates uncertainty on the part of the college as to 
the student's probable success. Probation is lifted when the student 
shows satisfactory improvement in his work. A probationary student 
who fails to show such improvement may be asked to leave the college. 
A student on probation is required to withdraw at the end of 
that term unless a substantial improvement in the grade-point average 
is attained. The complete records of such students are reviewed by 
the Committee on Admissions and Standards at the close of each 
semester. 

Failure in a course usually delays graduation from the college. 
However, a student may attend a summer session here or with the 
permission of the Committee on Admissions and Standards attend 
elsewhere and transfer the earned credit to the college. As a rule a 
student may not repeat a course more than once. 

Students in the liberal arts program who expect to transfer to 
another institution with advanced standing should maintain grades 
of C or higher in each course attempted, since, ordinarily, institutions 
of higher learning do not accept courses in which a grade of less than 
G has been earned. 

Entering students who are defective in speech and/or hearing 
are referred to the Speech Division for testing and required to take a 
course in Corrective Speech. 

Freshmen are required to take a course in Fundamentals of 
Public Speaking. Exemption from this course is granted if the student 
passes a performance test given by two members of the Speech Divi- 
sion. The performance test must be taken before the end of the first 
week of the course in Fundamentals of Speech. Those who thus 
qualify for exemption may choose an advanced course in speech or 
an elective in another field. 

Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking 
Speech 100, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, are required to satisfy 
the requirements of Speech 090, Corrective Speech, before being rec- 
ommended for graduation. 

In general a student is eligible to enter the student teaching 
semester when (a) he has completed English 102, 103, and Speech 

41 



100; (b) he has completed ail professional prerequisites and has 
achieved a cumulative average appropriate to his classification 
(see Standards of Work Required, page 41; (c) he has received 
the approval of the director of his division. However, a student who 
makes one or more "D" or "F" grades in professional courses pre- 
ceding student teaching will not be permitted to enter student 
teaching. If the student is permitted to remain in the college, he 
must repeat the professional courses in which he received "D" or 
"F" grades. 

The personal development of each student is considered. The 
College may exercise its right to ask a student to withdraw at any 
time. 

SENIOR EXAMINATIONS 

All students enrolled in the Teacher Education program are 
required to take the examinations of the Teacher Education Examina- 
tion Program. These examinations are scheduled once each year 
during the spring semester. Students eligible for the examinations are 
those who expect to complete graduation requirements in spring or 
summer of the year of the examination or by the end of the first 
semester of the following school year. 

THE COLLEGE HONORS PLAN 

General Statement 

The honors plan of the College is designed to encourage and 
reward superior scholarship. It offers to able students the opportunity 
to enrich their academic experiences and to pursue their academic 
interests in a way different from the normal sequence of courses in 
the college curriculum. Because of individual student differences and 
because the College seeks to encourage independence and maturity, 
students meeting certain requirements are free to seek enrichment of 
or acceleration and concentration in their academic programs in some 
areas while pursuing a normal sequence of courses in other academic 
fields. Upon successful completion of their honors work, students will 
receive their degrees with honors. 

The Honors Plan for Freshmen and Sophomores 

The honors plan for freshmen and sophomores provides for en- 
richment of the students' experiences through special honors sections 
in required courses on the 100, 200, and 300 levels. Students are 
invited to enter these sections on the basis of their high school records, 
relevant tests, college performance and the recommendation of high 
school and college faculty. Selection of students eligible for honors 
sections is made by the Dean of Instruction in consultation with the 
departments concerned. 

The honors plan for freshmen and sophomores also pro- 
vides for enrichment and acceleration through waiving certain re- 
quired courses. Students who demonstrate their competence in re- 
quired courses by means of proficiency examinations given by the 

42 



departments concerned or by the College Entrance Examination Board 
will be permitted to follow either of two paths. They may enrich 
their academic experiences by enrolling in courses in fields other than 
those of the waived courses, or they may accelerate their academic 
program by enrolling in advanced courses whose prerequisites are the 
required courses which were waived. 

Entering freshmen wishing to obtain waiver of courses for the 
honors plan may arrange to take Advanced Placement Tests of the 
College Entrance Examination Board in fields in which they feel 
qualified. Arrangements to take these examinations in May of the 
senior year may be made through the school counselor or the address 
given on page 

The Honors Plan for Juniors and Seniors 

The honors plan for juniors and seniors is primarily designed for 
enrichment of the students' academic experiences, and it may be pur- 
sued in either of two ways. 

Students who wish to broaden their knowledge and understanding 
in more than one subject may enroll for seminars or independent 
study on the 400 level or above in any discipline irrespective of their 
major. Admission to this aspect of the honors plan is dependent upon 
fulfilling prerequisites for enrollment in the courses desired. 

Students who wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding 
in a specific way may enroll in the honors programs conducted by 
individual departments. Departmental honors programs are arranged 
by each department according to the discipline involved, but in gen- 
eral they consist of independent study, and seminars and research 
work under the guidance of department faculty. Requirements for 
admission to departmental honors programs are established by the 
individual departments. Students should consult department chair- 
men about these requirements. 

Requirements for Receiving Degrees with Honors or with Honors in 
a Discipline 

To receive the bachelor's degree with honors, students raust, in 
their junior and senior years, have met the following requirements: 
a minimum of nine semester hours of seminar work and independent 
study at the 400 level or above divided between a minimum of two 
disciplines; a minimum grade of B in the nine required semester 
hours; a minimum cumulative average at graduation of 3.3. 

To receive a bachelor's degree with honors in a discipline, stu- 
dents must complete a departmental honors program and be recom- 
mended for honors by that department. 

ATTENDANCE 

A student-faculty attendance committee, responsible to the 
Committee on Admissions and Standards, administers the college 
attendance policy. 

43 



The college attendance policy places responsibility on the stu- 
dent for attending classes and for filing reasons for necessary absence 
from classes. Students should file within 48 hours after their return 
to college, on the official blank, a record of each absence except 
those for college-sponsored events. A record of absence for medical 
reasons will be filed at the Health Center. A record of absence for 
personal reasons will be filed at Stephens Hall in Room 109. 

No absences are permitted on the day preceding or the day fol- 
lowing a holiday except by prior approval of the Attendance Com- 
mittee. No absences from final examinations are permitted except 
by prior approval of the Attendance Committee. Absences from 
examinations because of emergency illness or accident should be 
reported to the Office of the Dean of Students immediately by tele- 
phone. All students are reminded that unexcused absence from a 
final examination constitutes a failure in the examination. 

LENGTH OF ATTENDANCE 

Only in unusual cases may a student remain in the college for 
longer than eight semesters. Any requests for deviation from this 
plan must be submitted to the Admissions and Standards Commit- 
tee a month prior to the end of a semester. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A student wishing to withdraw should see the Dean of Stu- 
dents who will provide the form necessary to make the withdrawal 
official. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of a student's record will be sent to other educational 
institutions and organizations only upon written request of the 
student concerned. The first transcript is issued free of charge. A 
charge of one dollar is made for each subsequent transcript and 
should be enclosed with the request. A supplement of one semester's 
work only will be furnished for fifty cents. Upon a student's gradu- 
ation, a transcript is sent to the Maryland State Department of 
Education. When requested, transcripts are sent to the Baltimore 
City Department of Education. No charge is made at any time for 
transcripts sent to either of these departments. One copy of the 
student's record marked "not an official transcript" is furnished 
free to the student upon graduation. It is not the policy of the 
college to issue official transcripts directly to students and graduates. 

A student who withdraws from the Teacher Education program 
before graduation and requests a transcript for the purpose of con- 
tinuing his college education must first reimburse the college for 
whatever education he has received tuition-free (see Liability For 
Unpaid Tuition, page 23.) 



44 



THE COLLEGE CURRICULA 

All degree curricula of the college are based upon a fundamental 
background of general studies. Fifty-two semester hours of liberal 
arts or general education courses are required of all students working 
toward the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees. 
Additional courses in general education are required of prospective 
elementary school teachers; all other students will acquire depth 
of understanding by developing a major in one field. 



SPECIALIZATION 

A major in academic fields is earned by completing about eight 
courses, generally, beyond the basic required courses in the chosen 
field — or about 35 credit hours of work, the exact amount being 
set by the various departments. Three possible benefits make the 
pursuit of a major course of study desirable: it prepares the student 
for graduate study in the field; it qualifies the graduate from the 
Teacher Education program to teach the subject in junior and 
senior high school; it prevents a possible too-wide dispersion of 
effort which would result in a lack of real competency in any branch 
of knowledge. 

Students may select a major from one of the following fields: 
Art, Biology, English, Elementary Education, Geography, Elementary 
School Science, High School Science, History, Kindergarten- Primary 
and Elementary Education, Mathematics, Music, Physical Educa- 
tion, Speech and Drama, and Social Science. Majors are being 
developed in other areas. A number of departments offer minors. 
The required hours of work are listed with the department course 
descriptions. 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements 
for graduation as set forth in the college catalogue. When the require- 
ments are changed after a student has enrolled in the college, the 
student has the option of meeting in full the requirements that were 
in effect at the time of entrance or those that are in effect at the 
time of graduation. When the college withdraws former required 
courses, the Admissions and Standards Committee will approve 
substitutions for students graduating under the former requirements. 
The student's advisor assists in the planning of a program, hut the 
final responsibility for meeting the requirements for graduation rests 
with the student. 



45 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREES 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements 
will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. College credit of one hundred twenty-eight semester hours. 

2. Credit in the courses required of all students. 

3. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has 
elected. 

4. A major must be completed by all students except those 
in Kindergarten-Primary and Elementary programs. How- 
ever, Kindergarten-Primary and Elementary Education stu- 
dents are encouraged to have a major. 

5. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

6. Fulfillment of the speech requirement.* 

7. Certification by the college physician of physical fitness. 

8. Record of attendance at the college for at least one college 
year during which thirty semester hours of credit were 
earned. A student is expected to earn his final 30 credits 
at the college unless he receives special permission to the 
contrary. 

9. Demonstration of personal qualities which are expected of 
an educated person. 

10. A record of having taken the required sophomore and 
senior examinations or their approved equivalents. 

Those wishing to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree may do 
so by fulfilling the above requirements including two years or the 
equivalent of a modern foreign language. 

THE MEANING OF COURSE NUMBERS 

Each department of the college has a code number, shown in 
parentheses at the head of the department announcement. Each 
course has a distinctive number, with the following significance: 
Courses numbered 100-199 inclusive are primarily for freshmen, 
200-299 primarily for sophomores, 300-399 primarily for juniors, 
and 400-499 primarily for seniors. Students may register for courses 
one level above or one level below their classification. Seniors are 
expected to confine themselves to 300 courses and higher. 

Courses for which college credit is not given are assigned a 
number lower than 100. 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a 
hyphen are to be taken in sequence. When course numbers are 
separated by a comma, either semester may be taken independently 
of the other. 



* Students who are deficient in speech at any time after taking Speech 100, 
Fundamentals of Public Speaking, are required to satisfy the requirements 
of Speech 090, Corrective Speech, before being recommended for graduation. 

46 



"a" COURSES 

For all courses numbered with the addition of the letter "a" 
the following explanation applies: for the additional credit hour, 
students are required to do extra work in areas of special interest 
under direction of the instructor. 

Permission to register for any course carrying the letter "a" 
must be obtained from the instructor of the course at registration 
time only. A student electing the additional hour credit may not 
change the value of the course after the first week of the semester 
or the equivalent thereof in teaching time. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Students majoring in the various areas will need to choose 
their electives with extreme care. Before registering for courses which 
are not required students should consult their advisers. The advice 
of the instructor in the course or the chairman of the department 
in which the elective course is listed may need to be sought before 
a wise decision is made concerning the choice of an elective. 

TIME OF OFFERING 

A course is offered every semester of every year, unless the 
semester or semester and year is specified in this catalogue, or unless 
a change is made in the semester schedule. All non-required courses 
are offered subject to sufficient enrollment. 

CREDIT VALUE OF COURSES 

The semester credit value of the course is indicated in the line 
following the title. 



47 



GENERAL COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 
OF ALL STUDENTS 

For the B.A. Degree 

The requirements for the B.A. Degree will include the listings on 
this page plus 12 hours or the equivalent in one foreign language. 

For the B.S. Degree 

ART 

Art in the Culture 203 2 credits 

ENGLISH 

Composition and Introduction to 

Literature 102-103 6 credits 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 100 2 credits 

English 204, 205 6 credits 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Health Education 205 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 

Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic 204 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Appreciation 103 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 101-102 2 credits 

PSYCHOLOGY 

General Psychology 201 3 credits 

SCIENCE 

Biological Science 4 credits 

Physical Science 4 credits 

Another course approved by the Department 4 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History of Western Civilization 121,122 or History 
of the United States 221,222, plus six hours of 
additional social science credit 12 credits 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 

Orientation to the College credit 

TOTAL 52 credits 

48 




STEPHENS HALL 
Administration Building 










NEWELL HALL 








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ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR 

STUDENTS IN KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY 
AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

ART 

Fundamentals of Design 103 2 credits 

MATHEMATICS 

General College Mathematics 205 3 credits 

MUSIC 

Music Fundamentals 203 2 credits 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 201-202 2 credits 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Geography 103,104 (if 6 hours have not been taken 

in the 12 hours of social science requirements.) 6 credits 

TOTAL 9 to 15 credits 
TOTAL FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 52 credits 

TOTAL FOR KINDERGARTEN- 
PRIMARY STUDENTS 61 to 67 credits 



49 



COURSES REQUIRED FOR A MAJOR 

1. Meet general college requirements as listed on page 48. 

2. Check Departmental heading in catalogue for departmental 
requirements and course titles. 



ART 

1.103 2 hours 

1.203 2 hours 

1.210 2 hours 

1.340 3 hours 

1.331 2 hours 

1.321 2 hours 

1.322 2 hours 

1.329 2 hours 

Plus 14 to 20 elective hours in Art. 
(Prospective teachers take 1.325, 
5.376, 5.396, and 5.390.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professional Laboratory Skills 

16.112 through 16.313 12 hours 

(Will meet 2 hours of General 
College Requirement) 

17.209-210 (Will meet 8 hours 

4 hours of General College 
Requirement) 

16.330 3 hours 

16.340 2 hours 

16.380 2 hours 

16.390 3 hours 

16.400-401 4 hours 

16.110 2 hours 

8.115 1 hour 

16.210 3 hours 

5.373-395 4 hours 

16.430 or 16.350 2 hours 

8.405 2 hours 

Student Teaching 12 hours 



SPEECH AND DRAMA 

40.100 2 hours 

40.330 3 hours 

40.205 2 hours 

Prospective teachers of speech take 
40.300. Other students take 40.220. 
The remaining 26 hours required 
must be spent in departmental elec- 
tives that suit the student's needs. 



ENGLISH 

6.102-103 6 hours 

6.204-205 6 hours 

6.307-308 6 hours 

Plus 18 elective hours. Twelve (12) 
hours must be 300 or 400 level 
courses in English. 

MATHEMATICS 

11.206 3 hours 

11.111 3 hours 

11.112 3 hours 

11.113 3 hours 

11.223-224 6 hours 

17.211 4 hours 

Plus 15 hours selected from 11.211, 
202, 331, 333, 335, 339, 401, 431, 
433, and 437. 

MUSIC 

13.150-451 7 hours 

13.204-206 2 hours 

13.209-210 no credit 

13.211-212 7 hours 

(vocal) 

13.215-216 3-4 hours 

(instrumental) 

13.217-218 no credit 

13.220-221 2 hours 

13.222 1 hour 

13.223 1 hour 

13.224 1 hour 

13.225-226 6 hours 

13.228-229 6 hours 

13.230-231 

or 
13.232-233 

or 

13.234-235 no credit 

13.240-241 3-4 hours 

(instrumental) 
13.314-315 2 hours 

13.316 2 hours 

13.317 2 hours 

13.318-319 6 hours 

13.324 3 hours 

13.400 1 hour 

5.372 2 hours 

5.392 2 hours 

5.430 3 hours 



50 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 

17.103 4 hours 

17.200-201 8 hours 

17.300 3 hours 

17.400 3 hours 

17.310 3 hours 

17.204 4 hours 

17.214 3 hours 

17.320a 3 hours 

17.324 3 hours 

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE 

17.103 4 hours 

17.206-207 8 hours 

17.216 or 218 4 hours 

17.214 3 hours 

17.204 4 hours 

17.211-212 8 hours 

17.402 3 hours 

17.401 2 hours 

17.324 3 hours 

17.320a 3 hours 

11.111 3 hours 

Plus eleven (11) hours of electives 
including one field course. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 28 hours 

Chemistry 8 hours 

Earth Science 3 hours 

Biology 7 hours 

Mathematics 12 hours 

For a total of 58 hours. Consult with 
Department Chairman before Junior 
year. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

30.121 and 122 6 hours 

30.211 and 222 6 hours 

30.103, 104 ..._.._. 6 hours 

6 hours in Political Science, 6 hours 
in Sociology or Anthropology and 6 
hours in Economics. The remaining 
18 hours must be selected from upper 
division courses in conference with 
departmental adviser. 



BIOLOGY 

17.103 4 hours 

17.206-207 8 hours 

17.218 4 hours 

17.211-212 8 hours 

17.204 4 hours 

17.214 3 hours 

17.205 4 hours 

17.215 4 hours 

17.410 2 hours 

11.111 3 hours 

Plus nine (9) elective hours in 
Biology. 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 28 hours 

Physics 8 hours 

Earth Science 3 hours 

Biology 7 hours 

Mathematics 12 hours 

For a total of 58 hours. Consult with 
Department Chairman before Junior 
year. 



GEOGRAPHY 

30.103-104 6 hours 

30.310 3 hours 

30.316 3 hours 

either 30.330, 331, 395 

or 413 3 hours 

The remaining 15-16 hours must be 
selected from Geography electives, in 
conference with departmental advisers. 



HISTORY 

30.121 and 122 6 hours 

30.221 and 222 6 hours 

30.420 2 hours 

The remaining 16 hours must be 
selected from History electives in 
conference with departmental adviser. 



51 



PROGRAMS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

The supply of Towson graduates does not come close to meet- 
ing the demand for them. This in part reflects the current national 
shortage of teachers; it also reflects a special regard for Towson 
graduates in school systems throughout the State. 

Towson has been preparing teachers for the public schools of 
Maryland for over ninety years. Out of this long experience have 
come the present three programs for teachers, directed toward 
three grade-levels: kindergarten-primary (through the third 
grade), elementary (first through sixth grades), and secondary 
(seventh through twelfth grades). The necessary variations among 
them lie mainly in the required professional courses — that is, those 
courses concerned with understanding children, educational theory, 
and classroom techniques. 

These professional courses, comprising about twenty per cent 
of the four years' work, consist of roughly two-thirds classwork at 
the College and one-third experiences, including student teaching, 
in the classrooms of neighboring public school systems. 

The remaining work is given over to studies of a general na- 
ture — in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sci- 
ences — providing a well-rounded college education, as well as neces- 
sary background in the subject the student will eventually teach. 
Certain basic courses are required, assuring foundations in all 
broad areas of knowledge; but even among these there are frequent 
choices, and beyond them is the opportunity for electives that 
make possible the pursuit of special interests. 

COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL 
KINDERGARTEN— PRIMARY STUDENTS 

1. Meet all requirements as listed on pages 48-49. 

2. In addition, the following are required: 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design 2 hours 

5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 hour 

5.333 Professional Block I 6 hours 

5.334 Professional Block II 3 hours 

5.335 Professional Block III 5 hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 hours 

5.410 Foundations of Education 2 hours 

11.205 General College Mathematics 3 hours 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 hours 

16.201, 202 Physical Education 2 hours 

20.203 Human Growth and Learning 3 hours 

30.103, 104 Geography 6 hours 

TOTAL 45 hours 

52 



3. By completing all of these courses, plus 31 elective hours, the 
student will meet degree requirements and be eligible for Mary- 
land State certification. 

For a Major: 5 additional hours elective in the area, under 
guidance of the Director with grades of "B" or better. One term of 
Student Teaching must be at the Kindergarten level. 

COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION STUDENTS 

1. Meet all requirements as listed on page 48. 

2. In addition, the following courses are required: 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design 2 hours 

5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 hour 

5.360 Overview in Education 2 hours 

5.362 The Teaching of Science and Social Studies .... 3 hours 

5.363 Arithmetic Methods 2 hours 

5.364 The Teaching of Reading and Other Language 

Arts , 3 hours 

5.371, 372, Art, Music, or Physical Education 

Methods (Take 2) 4 hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 hours 

11.205 General College Mathematics 3 hours 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 hours 

16.201, 202 Physical Education 2 hours 

20.203 Human Growth and Learning 3 hours 

30.103, 104 Geography 6 hours 

TOTAL 45 hours 

3. By completing all of these courses, plus 31 elective hours, the 
student will meet degree requirements and be eligible for Mary- 
land State certification. 

For a Major: 20.402 Measurement and Evaluation 3 hours 
5.425 The Teaching of Reading and 
Other Language Arts — Ad- 
vanced Course 2 hours 

A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and 
no professional education course grade lower 
than "B". Grades of "B" or better in courses 
20.402 and 5.425. 



53 



COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL 
SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENTS 

1. Meet all requirements as listed on page 48, 

2. In addition, the following courses are required: 

5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 hour 

5.381 Principles of Secondary Education 3 hours 

An approved methods course 2 hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 hours 

5.391 Audio-Visual Laboratory 1 hour 

5.410 Foundations of Education 2 hours 

20.203 Human Growth and Learning 3 hours 

TOTAL 22 hours 

3. All secondary education students (junior high school and senior 
high school) must select a major. The number of hours and 
required courses for a major are defined under the department 
heading of this catalogue. The major plus the additional number 
of electives needed to fulfill the remaining 54 hours will meet 
degree requirements and Maryland State certification require- 
ments. 

SEQUENCES OF COURSES 

Sequences of courses for teacher education students in Kinder- 
garten-Primary, Elementary and Secondary Education are out- 
lined on the following pages. Alternate arrangements of courses — 
Pattern A and Pattern B — are suggested for the guidance of all stu- 
dents. Transfer students and others unable to meet graduation 
requirements under the regular patterns must first consult with 
their major adviser and then plan curriculum patterns during their 
first semester at the College in conference with the director 
of their professional division. 



54 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 
Freshman Year — Program A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

6.102 Composition & Literature 3 

6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

17.103 or 200 Biology or 

Physical Science 4 

30.103, or 121, or 221 Geography 

or History 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 4 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design.... 2 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 
6.103 Composition & Literature 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.104, 122 or 222 Geograhy 

or History 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 5 to 7 



Total 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



Sophomore Year — Program A 
SEMESTER I SEMESTER II 



hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 1.203 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic .... 3 13.203 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 16.202 

16.201 Physical Education 1 20.201 

30.103, 121 or 221 Geography 30.104, 

or History 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 



hours 

Art in the Culture 2 

Music Fundamentals 2 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

122 or 222 Geography 

or History 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 



Total 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



5.333 

8.205 

20.203 



Junior Year — Program A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Professional Block I 6 

Health 2 

Human Growth & 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

5.334 Professional Block II 2 

6.205 Literature 3 

11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

17.200 or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 



Total 15 to 17 



Senior Year — Program A 

SEMESTER I SEMESTER II 

hours hours 

5.334 Professional Block III .... 5 5.410 Foundations of Education 2 

5.390 Student Teaching 10 17. Science^ (Gen'l. 

requirements) 4 

Total 15 Electives and Major 

Courses 9 to 11 

Total 15 to 17 



55 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY PROGRAM 
Freshman Year — Program B 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

0.101 Orientation 

1.103 Fundamentals of Design.. 2 
6.102 Composition & Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.103 or 121 or 221 

Geography or History.. 3 
Electives or Major 
Courses 4 to 6 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 
6.102 Composition & Literature 3 
6.122 Public Speaking 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.103 or 200 Biology or 

Physical Science 4 

30.104 or 122 or 222 Geography 

or History 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 3 



Total 16 to 17 



Sophomore Year — Program B 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Art in the Culture 2 

English Literature 3 

Health 2 

Music Fundamentals 2 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

30.103 or 121 or 221 Geography 

or History 3 



1.203 

6.204 

8.205 

13.203 

16.201 

20.201 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

Professional Block 1 6 

Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

Physical Education 1 

Human Growth & 

Learning 3 

30.104 or 122 or_222 Geography 

or History 3 



5.333 
11.204 
16.202 
20.203 



Total 16 



Total 16 



5.334 

6.205 

11.205 

17.200 


Junior 
SEMESTER I 

Professional Block II . 

Literature 

General College 

Mathematics 

or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 

Electives or Major 
Courses 2 


Year- 

hours 

3 

3 

3 

4 

to 4 


-Program B 

SEMESTER II 

5.335 Professional Block 
5.390 Student Teaching 

Total 


hours 
III .... 5 
10 


15 



Total 15 to 17 

Senior Year — Program B 

SEMESTER I SEMESTER II 

hours hours 

5.410 Foundations of Electives or Major Courses 15 to 17 

Education 2 or 3 

17. Science (Gen'l. Total 15 to 17 

requirement) 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 



Total 15 to 17 

* Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language, 
another elective, or a course needed for a major is preferred. 
Note: Students in the Kindergarten-Primary Program who desire an academic 
major will either elect Program A or have attained sufficient academic average 
to carry the additional credit hours needed to pursue major courses in the 
sophomore year. 

56 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
Freshman Year — Pattern A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Orientation 

Composition and 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 1 

17.103 or 200 Biology or 

Physical Science 4 

30.121, 221, or 103 History or 

Geography 3 

Public Speaking 2 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 4 



0.090 
6.102 

16.101 



40.100 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
1.103 Fundamentals of Design.. 2 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

30.122, 222, or 104 History 

or Geography 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 



Total 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



Sophomore Year — Pattern A 



6.204 
11.204 
13.203 
16.201 
20.201 
30.103, 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

English Literature 3 

Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

Music Fundamentals 2 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

121, or 221 Geography 

or History 3 

*Elective or Major 

Courses or 2 



Total 15 to 17 



Junior Year- 

SEMESTER I 

hours 

5.360 Overview of Education 2 

5.363 The Teaching of 

Arithmetic 2 

5.371, 372, 373 Art or Music 

or Physical Education 

Methods (take 2) 4 

6.205 English Literature 3 

17.200 or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 4 

•Elective or Major 

Course to 2 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

Art in the Culture 2 

Health 2 

General College 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 1 

Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

30.104, 122, 222 History or 

Geography 3 

*Electives or Major 

Course 1 to 3 



1.203 

8.205 

11.205 

16.202 
20.203 



Total 16 or 17 

-Pattern A 

SEMESTER II 

hours 
5.362 The Teaching of Science.. 1/2 
5.361 The Teaching of 

Social Studies 1/4 

5.364 The Teaching of Reading 
and Other Language 

Arts 3 

Student Teaching 10 



5.390 



Total 16 



Total 15 to 17 



Senior Year — Pattern A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 
5.410 Foundations of 

Education 2 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 13 to 15 



17. 



SEMESTER II 














hours 


Science 








4 


*Electives or 


Major 






Courses .. 




11 


to 


13 


Total.. 




15 


to 


17 



Total 15 to 17 



57 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Freshman Year — Pattern B 



0.090 
1.103 
6.102 

13.103 
16.101 
30.121, 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Orientation 

Fundamentals of Design.... 2 
Composition and 

Literature 3 

Music Appreciation 2 

Physical Education 1 

103, or 221 History or 

Geography 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 



SEMESTER U 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching.. 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.103 Fundamentals of Biology.. 4 
30.104, 122, 222 History or 

Geography 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 1 or 3 



Total 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



Sophomore Year — ^Pattern B 



1.203 

8.205 

11.204 

16.201 

30.103, 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Art in the Culture 2 

Health 2 

Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

Physical Education 1 

121, 221 History or 

Geography 3 

*Electives or Major 

Course 4 to 6 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
11.205 General College 

Mathematics 3 

13.203 Music Fundamentals 2 

16.202 Physical Education 1 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

30.104, 122, 222 History or 

Geography 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 3 to 5 



Junior Year — Pattern B 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

17.200 or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 4 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 5 to 7 



5.360 
5.363 

5.371, 



6.205 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
Overview of Education .... 2 
The Teaching of 

Arithmetic 2 

372, 373 Art or Music or 

Physical Education 

Methods (take 2) 4 

English Literature 3 

Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 6 



5.36 
5.36 

5.390 
5.364 



Senior Year — ^Pattern 

SEMESTER I 

hours 
The Teaching of Science I/2 5.410 
The Teaching of Social 17. 

Studies 1^2 

Student Teaching 10 

The Teaching of Reading 
and other Language 

Arts 3 

Total 16 



Total 15 to 17 

B 

SEMESTER II 

hours 
Foundations of Education 2 

Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 



Total 15 to 17 



* Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language, 
another elective, or a course needed for a major is preferred. Note: Students 
planning a major in certain departments (such as art, mathematics, science) 
will have the advice of that department before completing freshman registra- 
tion. In most cases the freshman needs to elect a course In the department. 

58 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 
Freshman Year — Pattern A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

0.090 Orientation 

1.203 Art in the Culture 2 

6.102 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.101 Physical Education 1 

30.121 or 221 History 3 

**Electives or Major 

Courses 7 to 8 



Total 16 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
5.105 Introduction to Teaching 1 
6.103 Composition and 

Literature 3 

16.102 Physical Education 1 

17.103 or 200 Biology^ or 

Physical Science 4 

30.122 History 3 

40.100 Public Speaking 2 

**Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 3 



Total 16 to 17 



Sophmore Year — Pattern A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

17.200 or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 4 

**Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 5 



Total 16 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

6.204 English Literature 3 

6.205 English Literature 3 

13.103 Music Appreciation 2 

20.203 Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Social Science 3 

**Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 3 



Total 16 to 17 



Junior Year — Pattern A 



SEMESTER I 

hours 
5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Education 3 

*Social Science 3 

Elective or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 



Total 15 to 17 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

5.390 Student Teaching 

♦Methods 10 

5.391 Audio-Visual 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 4 



Total 14 to 16 



SEMESTER I 

5.410 Foundations of 

Education 2 

♦Science 4 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 



Senior Year — Pattern A 

SEMESTER II 



Total 15 to 17 



hours 
Electives or Major 

Courses 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



59 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Freshman Year — Pattern B 



0.090 
1.203 
6.102 

16.101 
30.121 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Orientation 

Art in the Culture 2 

Composition and 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 1 

or 221 History 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 7 to 8 



Total 16 to 17 



SEMESTER H 

hours 
Introduction to 

Teaching** 1 

Composition and 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 1 

or 200 Biology or 

Physical Science 4 

30.122 or 222 History 3 

40.100 Public Speaking ^ 2 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 3 



5.105 

6.103 

16.102 
17.103 



Total 16 to 17 



Sophomore Year — Pattern B 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

8.205 Health 2 

11.204 Concepts of Arithmetic... 3 

17.200 or 103 Physical Science 

or Biology 4 

20.201 General Psychology 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 4 to 5 



6.204 

6.205 

13.103 

20.203 



SEMESTER II 

hours 

English Literature 3 

English Literature 3 

Music Appreciation 2 

Human Growth and 

Learning 3 

Social Science 3 

*Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 3 



Total 16 to 17 



Total 16 to 17 



Junior Year — Pattern B 

SEMESTER I SEMESTER II 

hours hours 

Social Science 3 5.381 Principles of Secondary 

Electives or Major Education** 3 

Courses 12 to 14 Electives or Major 

Courses 12 to 14 



Total 15 to 17 



Total 15 to 17 



Senior Year — Pattern B 



5.390 
5.391 



SEMESTER I 

hours 

Student Teaching 10 

Audio-Visual 1 

Methods 2 

Electives or Major 

Courses 2 to 4 



5.410 



SEMESTER II 

hours 
Foundations of Education 2 

Science 4 

Electives or Major 

Courses 9 to 11 



Total 15 to 17 

Total 15 to 17 

* Courses required of all students may be chosen unless a foreign language, 
another elective, or a course needed for a major is preferred. 

** Students in their last two years who have not taken 5.105 Introduction 
to Teaching, should substitute Principles of Secondary Education (5.381a) 
for 4 credits to make up their required hours in Education. However, 
those transferring from other colleges should take Introduction to Teach- 
ing unless they have had a similar course. Note: Students planning to con- 
centrate in certain departments (such as art, mathematics, science) will 
have the advice of that department before completing freshman registration. 
In most cases the freshman needs to elect a course in the department. 

60 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

A graduate program leading to the Master of Education degree 
is offered for experienced elementary school teachers. See page 150 
for a description of the program. 

TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

Each graduate of a teacher education program at Towson will 
be qualified for state certification at the kindergarten-primary, ele- 
mentary, junior high school, or senior high level. (Preparation for 
junior high school certification may be completed in either of two 
ways: (1) the program in elementary education plus a major in the 
desired teaching field or (2) the complete program in secondary edu- 
cation.) The Standard Professional Certificate is issued for three 
years at graduation and is renewable for seven years upon completion 
of six semester hours of graduate or advanced undergraduate courses. 

The Towson graduate program affords opportunity to qualify 
for the Advanced Professional Certificate. Thereafter, a m